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UNEP-DHI Partnership – Centre on Water and Environment

Country of registration: 
Acronym: 
UNEP-DHI
Relation to CTCN: 
Consortium Partner
Knowledge Partner
Type of organisation: 
Private sector organization

Sector(s) of expertise

The UNEP-DHI Partnership – Centre on Water and Environment (UNEP-DHI) is a United Nations Environment Programme centre of expertise, dedicated to improving management of freshwater resources from the local to the global level. The UNEP-DHI Partnership is hosted at DHI, an independent, international consulting and research-based organization of more than 1200 employees, with offices in 30 countries, and with more than 50 years of experience in water resources management. UNEP-DHI is thus able to draw upon and combine the vast range of knowledge and skills of both UNEP and DHI, and is able to supplement these resources through its network of partner organizations in fields relating to its work.

Organisation name (local): 
UNEP-DHI Partnership – Centre on Water and Environment
Acronym (local): 
UNEP-DHI

Contributions

  • Decentralized community-run early warning systems

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Drought early warning systems

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Drought forecasting systems

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Early warning systems for floods

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Flash flood guidance systems

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Flood forecasting systems

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Landslide and mudflow warning systems

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Real-time monitoring networks

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Beach nourishment

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    This guide aims to help address this challenge by providing the missing identification and evaluation assistance that those looking for adaptation solutions initially face. More specifically, it focuses on adaptation technologies for building resilience to climate change induced hazards in the water sector. 

  • Breakwaters

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Cliff stabilization

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Coastal setbacks

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    Coastal setbacks are a prescribed distance to a coastal feature, such as a line of permanent vegetation, within which all or certain types of development are prohibited (Cambers 1998). A setback may dictate a minimum distance from the shoreline for new buildings or infrastructure facilities, or may require a minimum elevation above sea level for development. Elevation setbacks are used to adapt to coastal flooding, while lateral setbacks address coastal erosion.

  • Coastal wetlands

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

  • Coastal zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    Coastal zoning is the division of coastal areas into zones that can be assigned different purposes and user restrictions. It allows multiple users to benefit from a coastal area under a broader sustainable management strategy. Coastal zoning schemes can constitute the regulatory and planning framework for other management options.

  • Dikes

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    The primary function of dikes is to protect low-lying, coastal areas from sea inundation under extreme conditions (Pilarczyk 1998a). Dikes have a high volume that helps to resist water pressure, sloping sides to reduce wave loadings, and crest at heights sufficient to prevent overtopping by floodwaters. Dikes are made predominantly from earth, and consist of a sand core, watertight outer protection layer, toe protection and a drainage channel.

  • Dune construction and rehabilitation

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    Naturally occurring sand dunes are wind-formed sand deposits representing a store of sediment in the zone just landward of normal high tides (French 2001). Artificial dunes are engineered structures created to mimic the functioning of natural dunes. Dune rehabilitation refers to restoring degraded natural or artificial dunes to optimize coastal protection benefits.

  • Floating agricultural systems

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    Floating agriculture is a way of producing food in areas that are waterlogged for long periods of time. It is mainly aimed at adapting to increased or prolonged flooding.

    The system employs beds of rotting vegetation that act as compost for crop growth. The beds are able to float on the surface of the water, thus creating areas agricultural land in a waterlogged area. Scientifically, floating agriculture can be referred to as hydroponics.

  • Flood proofing

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    The primary objective of flood proofing is to reduce or avoid the impacts of coastal flooding on structures. This may include elevating them above the floodplain, employing designs and building materials that make them more resilient to flood damage, and preventing floodwaters from entering them in the flood zone, amongst other measures.

  • Fluvial sediment management

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    Fluvial sediment management is the holistic management of sediment supply from rivers to the coast, taking the full range of human activities at the river basin level into account.

  • Jetties

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 28 September 2017
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    Jetties are hard structures built at the banks of tidal inlets and river mouths to trap longshore sediment, thereby stabilizing the inlet or river mouth and preventing channel siltation. Jetties are solid and durable and are considered a hard-engineering protection measure.

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