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Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands

Country of registration: 
Acronym: 
ECN
Relation to CTCN: 
Consortium Partner
Knowledge Partner
CTCN Keyword Matches: 

Sector(s) of expertise

Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) is the largest energy research institute in the Netherlands. With around 500 members of staff, we are active in projects both at home and abroad, in joint efforts with the industry, government authorities and research institutes. We do this from our branches in Petten, Amsterdam, Eindhoven, Brussels and China. ECN’s research has a major influence on day-to-day life. In this, we perform an important function for the society of today and the future. 

Organisation name (local): 
Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland
Acronym (local): 
ECN
Active in: 
Worldwide

Contributions

  • Introduction to Technologies for Energy Efficiency in the Industry Sector

    Type: 
    Webinar
    Date and time: 
    Wednesday 26 August 2015 -
    3:00pm to 4:30pm
    CEST

    Join our CTCN Consortium Partner, the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, for this webinar on climate technology for energy efficiency in the industry.

  • CO2 mitigation

    Introduction to Climate Technologies for Mitigation: The role of climate technologies in reducing greenhouse gas emissions across sectors

    Type: 
    Webinar
    Date and time: 
    Wednesday 8 April 2015 -
    10:00am to 11:30am
    CEST

    What can climate technologies do across all sectors to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change?  Welcome to our fifth webinar in our new series. Join our CTCN Consortium Partner Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) for this introductory webinar on climate technologies for mitigation. 

  • Hybrid electic vehicles

    Hybrid electric vehicles

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors: 
    Objective: 

    One approach to lowering the CO2 emission from traffic is the hybridization of vehicles. A hybrid vehicle uses two or more distinct power sources, i.e. hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine an internal combustion engine and one or more electric motors. Vehicles employed in urban areas like small passenger cars, local delivery trucks and city busses benefit from hybridization and show substantially lower CO2 emissions, ranging from 23 to 43% depending on the traffic dynamics.

  • Integrated gasification combined-cycle

    Integrated gasification combined-cycle

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Coal gasification technology, often referred to as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), is the process of gasifying coal to produce electricity. The coal is gasified by burning finely-crushed coal in an environment with less than half the amount of oxygen needed to fully burn the coal. Essentially, the coal is not burned directly but undergoes a reaction with oxygen and steam. This produces what is known as synthetic gas or “syngas.” This gas is then combusted in a combined cycle generator to produce electricity.

  • Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

    Ocean thermal energy conversion

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Marine renewables, also known as ocean energy, refers to a broad range of technologies that extract energy from the ocean; this energy can be in the form of ocean waves, tidal movements or thermal gradients.  Marine renewables are, in general, at a relatively early stage in their development and, as such, the methods of converting these potential energy sources into useful electrical power are still highly diversified, with many technologies competing for commercial viability.

  • Non-motorised transport

    Promotion of non-motorised transport

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors: 
    Objective: 

    Non-motorised transport (NMT) is often a key element of successfully encouraging clean urban transport. It can be a very attractive mode of transport for relatively short distances, which make up the largest share of trips in cities. The key to reversing the trend towards more private vehicle use is making walking and cycling attractive, together with improving public transport. This can be done by a range of activities including construction of sidewalks and bike lanes, bike sharing programmes, urban planning and pedestrian-oriented development.

  • Tidal stream

    Tidal energy

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Marine renewables, also known as ocean energy, refers to a broad range of technologies that extract energy from the ocean; this energy can be in the form of ocean waves, tidal movements or thermal gradients. Marine renewables are, in general, at a relatively early stage in their development and, as such, the methods of converting these potential energy sources into useful electrical power are still highly diversified, with many technologies competing for commercial viability.

  • Wave energy

    Wave energy

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Marine renewables, also known as ocean energy, refers to a broad range of technologies that extract energy from the ocean; this energy can be in the form of ocean waves, tidal movements or thermal gradients. Marine renewables are, in general, at a relatively early stage in their development and, as such, the methods of converting these potential energy sources into useful electrical power are still highly diversified, with many technologies competing for commercial viability.

  • Energy Webinar: How gender-responsive methodologies can support Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs)

    Type: 
    Webinar
    Date and time: 
    Friday 27 January 2017 -
    9:00am to 11:00am
    EST

    Gender mainstreaming in the energy sector is taking place institutionally, through national policies and reforms, and through project development and implementation.

  • Small scale Combined Heat and power (CHP)

    Small-scale Combined Heat and power

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Co-generation is the combined production of useful thermal energy and electricity (Combined Heat and Power, CHP) from the same primary fuel. CHP can take on many forms and encompasses a range of technologies, but will always be based upon an efficient, integrated system that combines electricity production and heat recovery. By using the heat output from the electricity production for heating or industrial applications, CHP plants generally convert 75-80% of the fuel source into useful energy, while the most modern CHP plants reach efficiencies of 90% or more (IPCC, 2007).

  • Large scale Combined Heat and power (CHP)

    Large-scale Combined Heat and Power

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Co-generation is the combined production of useful thermal energy and electricity (Combined Heat and Power, CHP) from the same primary fuel. CHP can take on many forms and encompass a range of technologies, but will always be based upon an efficient, integrated system that combines electricity production and heat recovery. By using the heat output from the electricity production for heating or industrial applications, CHP plants generally convert 75-80% of the fuel source into useful energy, while the most modern CHP plants reach efficiencies of 90% or more (IPCC, 2007).

  • Fuel cells for mobile applications

    Fuel cells for mobile applications

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors: 
    Objective: 

    Fuel cells are used to produce electricity. They are considered a promising technology to replace conventional combustion engines in vehicles. Fuel cells may also replace batteries in portable electronic equipment. The most widely used types of fuel cells for mobile devices are Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells (PEM FC) which are often used in vehicles, and Direct Methanol fuel cells, used in portable applications. PEM fuel cells use hydrogen or certain alcohols such as methanol as fuel.

  • Smart grid

    Smart grid

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    The smart grid is the state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art technology for electrical system that can sensibly execute the operations to all interconnected elements -­‐ from generator to consumers. Smart grid simply converts the conventional power grid towards the modern grid in order to regulate sustainable, economic and reliable electricity (Massoud &Wollenberg, 2005 and Gellings, 2009). Smart grid intelligently executes operations from primary and secondary generators through the transmission and distribution network to the different types of consumers.

  • Highly efficient heating, ventilation and air conditioning

    Heating- Ventilation and Air Conditioning

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems supply fresh air and condition the indoor air temperature and humidity of a building. HVAC is reported as the key energy user (37%) in US buildings (WBCSD, 2008), accounting for 59% of the energy used in China commercial buildings in 2000 (Levine et al., 2007). Therefore, HVAC is a key component of climate change mitigation potential in the building sector.

  • Efficient air conditioning systems

    Efficient air conditioning systems

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Cooling is becoming a rapidly emerging demand in developing countries, which signifies that the building design and shell measures need to reduce cooling loads, and the efficiency of air-conditioning will need to be improved. Air conditioning systems are implemented in numerous sectors, namely buildings, industry and transport. They are distinguished in two main categories, room air conditioners and central air conditioners.

  • Methane Capture at Landfills for Electricity and Heat

    Methane Capture at Landfills for Electricity and Heat

    Type: 
    Technology
    Objective: 

    Under the anaerobic (oxygen free) conditions of landfill sites, organic waste is broken down by micro-organisms, leading to the formation of landfill gas (LFG). LFG is a gaseous mixture which consists mostly of methane and carbon dioxide, but also of a small amount of hydrogen and occasionally trace levels of hydrogen sulphide.

  • Biodiesel

    Biodiesel

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors: 
    Objective: 

    Liquid biofuels for transport, including biodiesel, have to a certain extent been in use for a very long time. In recent years however, they are enjoying renewed interest in both developed and developing countries as a result of the need to curb rising emissions from the transport sector, reduce dependence on expensive fossil oil imports and increase farm incomes.

  • Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors: 
    Objective: 

    A plug in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) is a hybrid electric vehicle with the ability to recharge its energy storage with electricity from an off-board power source such as a grid. PHEVs have the potential to displace a significant amount of fuel in the next 10 to 20 years. It is estimated that they can reduce fuel consumption by up to 45% relative to that of a comparable combustion engine vehicle.

  • Liquefied Natural Gas in trucks and cars

    Liquefied Natural Gas in trucks and cars

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors: 
    Objective: 

    The use of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) in transport is a suitable option to power, large long distance trucks in areas where gas is transported as LNG because there are indigenous gas supplies and no gas network. The use of LNG in passenger cars is far less viable because on average passenger cars stand idle more often, which would give rise to high evaporative losses. The use of LNG requires storage facilities for the cold (-162 0C) liquid natural gas at the roadside refueling stations and special fuelling equipment which can handle cryogenic temperatures.

  • Pulverised Coal Combustion with higher efficiency

    Pulverised Coal Combustion with higher efficiency

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors: 
    Objective: 

    Pulverised coal power plants account for about 97% of the world's coal-fired capacity. The conventional types of this technology have an efficiency of around 35%. For a higher efficiency of the technology supercritical and ultra-supercritical coal-fired technologies have been developed. These technologies can combust pulverised coal and produce steam at higher temperatures and under a higher pressure, so that an efficiency level of 45% can be reached (ultra-supercritical plants).

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