Filter by objective

Filter by sectors

Water augmentation (increasing capture and storage of surface run-off)

  • Sectors
    Objective

    Rainfall can provide some of the cleanest naturally occurring water that is available. There is considerable scope for the collection of rainwater when it falls, before huge losses occur due to evaporation, transpiration, and runoff and drainage - before it becomes contaminated by natural means or man-made activities. Rainwater harvesting is a particularly suitable technology for areas where there is no surface water, or where groundwater is deep or inaccessible due to hard ground conditions, or where it is too salty or acidic.

  • Sectors
    Objective

    Description

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is a water management approach that can be used to maximize

    natural storage and increase water supply system resilience during periods of low flows and high

    seasonal variability. During these periods, such as in the dry season, aquifers are intentionally recharged

    to recover water. A managed recharge implies that the recharge process is controlled and ensures

    health and environmental risks are minimized. MAR is a vital adaptation opportunity for developing

  • Sectors
    Objective

    Description

    Green spaces are areas covered by vegetation (e.g. grass, bushes or trees), where water can permeate

    through the soil and vegetation, filtrating part of the sediment and pollutants before reaching the

    underlying groundwater. Green spaces and permeable surfaces are particularly relevant in urban

    settings, where they help to uptake and infiltrate water, decreasing runoff rates. The water also often

    contains excessive amounts of pollutants. This subsequently reduces pressure on water drainage

  • Sectors
    Objective

    Description

    Improving irrigation efficiency aims at minimizing water use within the agricultural sector while continuing to maintain optimal crop productivity rates. Water (and energy) efficient irrigation also provides a number of environmental and socio-economic benefits. High irrigation efficiency is becoming increasingly important due to the current decrease in available water resources and growing populations that drive expansion of agricultural activities. 

  • Sectors
    Objective

    Description

    Progressive pricing is an instrument to manage water demand and help reduce excessive water consumption through an economic dis-incentive. Progressive pricing means that water price rates per unit of volume increase, as the volume used increases. Thus the largest consumers of water pay higher rates for the volume of water consumed beyond a certain threshold.

  • Sectors
    Objective

    Management, detection and repair of small leaks in a distribution system are critical functions of system operation and maintenance, yet they are often neglected. Large water main breaks can cause sensational damage and draw media attention, but those catastrophic failures only account for about 1% of water lost to leaks (USEPA, 2009). Some small leaks are noticeable at the ground surface and are easily identified, but many leaks continue below ground for months or years.