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Solid waste

  • Objective

    Thermal gasification of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a chemical process that generates a gaseous, fuel-rich product. This product can then be combusted in a boiler, producing steam for power generation. Just as with combustion of MSW, thermal MSW gasification does not necessarily compete with recycling programmes, but should be considered complementary in any generically constructed MSW plan.



  • Objective

    An inexpensive way to reduce greenhouse-active methane emissions from existing Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills is to exploit the natural process of microbial methane oxidation through improved landfill cover design. Landfill top covers, which optimise environmental conditions for methanotrophic bacteria and enhance biotic methane consumption, are often called ‘biocovers’ and function as vast bio-filters. Biocovers are typically spread over an entire landfill area.

  • Objective

    Integrated solid waste management (ISWM) can be defined in different ways, but it refers to the strategic approach to sustainable management of solid wastes covering all sources and all aspects such as waste generation, segregation, transfer, sorting, treatment, recovery and disposal in an integrated manner, with an emphasis on maximizing resource use efficiency. A plausible solution to waste management would be an integrated approach which would include collective management of all types of wastes and implementation of the 3R (Reduce, Reuse and Recycle) policies and strategies

  • Objective

    Many developed and developing countries practice composting and anaerobic digestion of mixed waste or biodegradable waste fractions (kitchen or restaurant wastes, garden waste, sewage sludge). Both processes are best applied to source-separated waste fractions. While composting is often appropriate for dry feedstocks, anaerobic digestion is particularly appropriate for wet wastes.

  • Objective

    Many developed and developing countries practice composting and anaerobic digestion of mixed waste or biodegradable waste fractions (kitchen or restaurant wastes, garden waste, sewage sludge). Both processes are best applied to source-separated waste fractions. While composting is often appropriate for dry feedstocks, anaerobic digestion is particularly appropriate for wet wastes.