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Cropland

Cropland

  • Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Land management options for mitigation fall in the following four categories: a) cropland management; b) grazing land management/pasture improvement; c) management of agricultural lands and d) restoration of degraded lands. This description focuses on the restoration of degraded lands. Within this description, a differentiation is made between a) management of organic and peaty soils and b) restoration of other degraded lands.

  • Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Mid-season drainage involves the removal of surface flood water from the rice crop for about seven days towards the end of tillering. The duration of the dry period must be long enough for rice plant to experience visible moisture stress. Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture. In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994.

  • Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Fertiliser and manure management in rice fields are important methane mitigation technologies. The fertiliser management mitigation option includes changes in: fertiliser types; fertiliser nutrient ratios; the rates and timing of applications; and use of nitrification inhibitors to reduce methane emissions by affecting methanogenesis in rice fields. Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture. In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994.

  • Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Biochar is a charcoal-like substance produced from agriculture and forest wastes which contains 70% carbon. It is used as soil enhancer to increase fertility, prevent soil degradation and to sequester carbon in the soil. Biochar can store carbon in the soil for as many as hundreds to thousands of years. Biochar can be produced through pyrolysis, gasification and hydrothermal carbonization, which leaves bio-oil and syngas as by-products. Small scale production can be through pyrolysis using modified stoves and kilns which are low cost and relatively simple technologies.

  • Type: 
    Technology
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    Objective:

    Manure coverage is the practice of covering the surface of manure with materials of certain thickness instead of the traditional method of piling up manure to be exposed to air. Manure coverage changes the amount of manure surface in contact with air. Due to some reactions, i.e., a series of physical, biological and chemical reactions, it can reduce GHG emissions.

  • Type: 
    Technology
    Objective:

    CO2 emissions can be reduced with effective irrigation by increasing yields and crop residues which can enhance carbon sequestration. (Smith et. al., 2008).

  • Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture (Figure 1). In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994. A variety of technologies are presented on ClimateTechWiki for reducing emissions from rice cultivation.

    Introduction

    The following rice-related mitigation technologies are described:

  • Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Emissions of GHGs are affected by the amounts and types of fertilisers applied, so judicious choice of fertiliser application rates and fertiliser types can reduce emissions. Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture. In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994.

  • Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Addition of electron acceptors, such as ferrihydrite, to paddy fields can stimulate microbial populations that compete with and slow the activity of methanogens, thereby reducing emissions of methane. Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture. In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994.