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Gender

Gender

Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change in situations of poverty, and their needs must therefore be addressed to ensure efficient and equitable climate mitigation and adaptation. Including women in climate decision-making allows for more efficient planning as women are best equipped to understand the impact they are experiencing themselves. As technology is not gender neutral, working with climate technologies requires that consideration be taken to ensure that women are included in decision-making processes, use of technologies, and benefit from the outcomes of technologies. Below you will find related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring this topic further.  

Gender

  • Water, Privatisation and Conflict: Women from the Cochabamba Valley

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2004
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    The women of Cochabamba, Bolivia, play a fundamental role in protecting water. Neoliberal policies have led to greater male migration, resulting in the feminisation of rural areas, with women carrying out much of the paid and unpaid work. This paper focuses on the conflict over the privatisation of water services in Cochabamba in 2000, where a popular movement successfully fought for their rights to the natural resource.

  • Weathering the Storm: Girls and Climate Change

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
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    How do girls experience climate change in Ethiopia and Bangladesh? This report, based on participatory research in the two countries, argues that programmes and policies that do not recognise the different ways in which girls and boys are affected by climate change risk exacerbating pre-existing gender inequalities and are failing to tackle one of the root causes of vulnerability to climate risk.

  • Life as Commerce: The impact of market-based conservation mechanisms on women

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
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    This paper highlights the need to support rural and indigenous women’s highly sustainable methods of using and protecting natural resources. It advocates that women’s knowledge should be developed and adapted to respond to the global problem of decreasing biodiversity, while protecting women’s rights within their families, communities and beyond. The paper notes that it is currently fashionable to approach biodiversity conservation from an economic perspective, where priority is given to ‘environmental services’ that create a profit.

  • Indian Ocean Tsunami Through The Gender Lens

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
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    The Indian Ocean Tsunami, also known as Asian Tsunami on 26 December 2004, is the deadliest in recorded history. Following Indonesia and Sri Lanka, India was the third hardest hit country with the Tsunami killing 12,405 people. In particular, the disaster affected women and children, who accounted for nearly 75 percent of the fatalities. This study examines the gendered realities that resulted in the aftermath of the Tsunami for men, women and transgenders (aravanis). The document shows how women were excluded from the list of beneficiaries prepared by the Panchayats(i.e.

  • Gender and Disaster Sourcebook

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday 1 January 2008
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    The Gender and Disaster Network hosts this online resource, the Gender and Disaster Sourcebook, which is for gender mainstreaming in disaster risk reduction and post-disaster management. Its intended users include survivors, activists, women’s organisations, research centres and institutes, government entities, as well as aid and humanitarian agencies. Among the types of resources it contains are gender mainstreaming guidelines, in-house reports and documents, first-person accounts, research protocols, training materials, university syllabi, policy guides, checklists and field guides.

  • Caught in the storm: the impact of natural disasters

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 December 2005
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    Following natural disasters, women and children account for more than 75 percent of those displaced. It is indisputable that women are disproportionately affected by natural disasters; however, governments and many non-governmental agencies ignore this fact. This report was produced by the Global Fund for Women, which has assisted women in post-disaster reconstruction following the 2004 tsunamis, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake, and Hurricanes Stan and Mitch (Central America 1998).

  • Guidelines for gender sensitive disaster management: Practical steps to ensure women’s needs are met and women’s human rights are protected during disasters

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2006
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    What can we learn from natural disaster responses of the past to make future efforts of this kind more gender-sensitive? This publication is the result of the project ‘Survey of Women’s Human Rights Violations in the Aftermath of the Tsunami in India, Indonesia, Thailand and Sri Lanka and the October 8, 2005 Earthquake in Pakistan’, which was coordinated by Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD). This project was developed in the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

  • Resilient women: women become change makers after 5 years of tsunami - , documentary film [seven minutes]

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
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    Five years after the 2004 tsunami, women survivors in the south of India have created new types of self-help organisations and reconstruction options to address immediate needs and long-term development goals. Local women’s groups in Cuddalore and Nagapattinam, two of the worst affected districts in Tamilnadu (India), complement and assist the work of the public health system by providing basic healthcare services and education in the community. A village nurse tells how the delivery of these services has been made easier since the formation of women’s groups post-tsunami.

  • Our life, our film

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2004
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    In 26 January 2001, Gujarat state in western India was devastated by an earthquake that left more than 20,000 dead, 167,000 injured and 700,000 homes destroyed. This film looks at the lives of women and children three years later. It was directed by eight women in quake-ravaged Kutch and Saurashtra regions, and produced by GROOTS and Swayam Shikshan Prayog (SSP). They travel to affected villages and talk to other people affected by the crisis. The goal of this film is to tell how women and children have progressed from crisis to development.

  • World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank: Haiti Post-Earthquake Track Record on Gender, Agriculture and Rural Development

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Friday 1 January 2010
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    This Gender Action report on two of Haiti’s largest and most influential donors and policy advisors, the World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), takes a look at their post-earthquake grants in Haiti. Contrary to both banks’ gender policy requirements, the majority of World Bank and IDB post-earthquake grants to Haiti are not explicitly gender sensitive, or focus on the role of women. Since the 2010 earthquake, World Bank has given seven grants and the IDB has approved 44 grants.

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