Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
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Gender

Technologies are not gender neutral, and tackling climate change demands that everyone's experience and skills are utilized. Therefore climate technology action needs to ensure that women and men are both engaged in decision-making processes, development and use of technologies, and benefit from their outcomes. Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change, and their needs must be addressed to ensure effective and equitable climate change actions. Women also bring new perspectives and innovations in identifying and implementing solutions. Below you will find  gender-related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring the topic of gender and climate change solutions further.  

Gender

  • A study on gender equality as a prerequisite for sustainable development: what we know about the extent to which women globally live in a more sustainable way than men, leave a smaller ecological footprint and cause less climate change

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    To what extent do women live more sustainably than men, leave a smaller ecological footprint and cause less climate change? This ideas paper studies what we know about gender equality as a prerequisite for sustainable development. The author illustrates how a gender perspective can facilitate more sustainable economic growth and well-being, directed more towards counter acting female time-poverty as compared to material consumption primarily benefiting rich men while also creating more job opportunities within the service sector which can help increase overall human wellbeing.

  • Gender and climate change research workshop: what do we know? what do we need to find out?

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    This paper summarises the outcomes of a workshop to discuss gender and climate change-related research, and its role and use in women's and gender-related advocacy in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process.Three questions were addressed:what do we need to know about gender and climate change to influence UNFCCC negotiations? The discussion identified the need for gender-specific data and knowledge in various forms on the causes and impacts of climate change, such as energy consumption and effects on healthwhat do we know already?

  • Gender: the missing component of the response to climate change

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    Analysing the gender dimension of climate change and the policies that have been established to mitigate and adapt to its impacts, this report points out that gender aspects have generally been neglected in international climate policy. This is a major concern given the emphasis of development policy making on general equity issues.

  • Focusing on gender differences can help countries respond to climate change

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    In most societies, women have lower incomes and fewer opportunities than men. This limits their capacity to respond to the effects of climate change. In fact, existing international climate policies neglect addressing gender. Considering how men and women cope could increase the ability of developing countries to deal with the impacts of climate change.Natural disasters and environmental damage associated
    with climate change are worse for vulnerable populations, including women and
    children. They depend largely on the environment for their livelihoods and have

  • Gender sensitive disaster management: a toolkit for practitioners

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    The risks and vulnerabilities that people face from natural disasters are as much a product of their social situation as their physical environment. Vulnerabilities and capacities of individuals and social groups evolve over time and determine people’s abilities to cope with disaster and recover from it. Social networks, power relationships, knowledge and skills, gender roles, health, wealth, and location, all affect risk and vulnerability to disasters and the capacity to respond to them.

  • Green jobs: towards decent work in a sustainable, low-carbon world

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    Amidst a visible period of transition with trade unions, employers’ organisations, the private sector and the UN allying themselves to low-carbon and sustainable thinking, this paper reports on the emergence of a “green economy” and its impact on the world of work in the 21st Century. It shows for the first time at a global level that green jobs are being generated in some sectors and economies.

  • Coping with riverbank erosion induced displacement

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    Each year, tens of thousands of people in Bangladesh are internally displaced as a consequence of riverbank erosion. Yet, such erosion does not draw the attention of policy makers in the same way that other natural disasters do and as a result, a number of coping mechanisms are employed by those affected, with the burden of displacement largely falling on women. This brief argues that instead of attempting to alter the course of nature, it is time to address the institutional mechanisms needed to help affected people cope with displacement and their material and social loss.

  • Gender: missing links in financing climate change. adaptation and mitigation

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    This position paper advocates for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to carefully plan the future of the climate regime in conjunction with proactive gender equality and sustainability guidelines, instead of being driven by dominant economic factors. It demands that all parties and stakeholders commit themselves to ensuring that climate change as well as mitigation and adaptation efforts shall not exacerbate the injustice, inequities and inequalities between women and men.