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Gender

Gender

Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change in situations of poverty, and their needs must therefore be addressed to ensure efficient and equitable climate mitigation and adaptation. Including women in climate decision-making allows for more efficient planning as women are best equipped to understand the impact they are experiencing themselves. As technology is not gender neutral, working with climate technologies requires that consideration be taken to ensure that women are included in decision-making processes, use of technologies, and benefit from the outcomes of technologies. Below you will find related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring this topic further.  

Gender

  • Gender and Climate Change Finance: A Case Study from the Philippines

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday 1 January 2008
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    This in-depth case study on national-level gender and climate change finance in the Philippines maps the close connections between climate change, agriculture and rural poverty as a way to better understand the gender dimensions of climate financing. The study documents the effects of climate change on Filipina women and assesses decision-making at the national level regarding gender roles and women’s rights in climate finance policy.

  • Governing Climate Funds: What Will Work for Women?

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Although women and girls in developing countries disproportionately experience the negative impacts of climate change, climate finance funds do not meaningfully integrate gender dimensions into their policies or programmes. This research report on gender in global finance mechanisms examines the integration of gender issues into the policies and investments of two climate funds and two non-climate funds, identifying practices that could ‘work for women’ in climate change financing.

  • Enhancing Gender Visibility in Disaster Risk Management and Climate Change in the Caribbean (in English, French and Spanish)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Accelerating climate change is posing greater environmental and natural disaster risks to the Caribbean region. This document is an executive summary providing an overview of a multi-agency study presented by the Caribbean Risk Management Initiative (CRMI). Its focus is on the gendered dimensions of climate change and disaster risk management and adaptation in the Caribbean region. Its primary objective is to help improve policies and practices by analysing the ways in which men and women are differently impacted.

  • ‘Women as key players in climate adaptation’, Joto Afrika 6

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    A person’s gender often dictates whether they gain or lose in environmental disasters: where women lack basic rights, more die from natural disasters than men; where they enjoy equal rights, the death rate is more equally matched.

  • Gender and Climate Change: Gender Experiences from Climate-Related GIZ Projects

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    The German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development has made gender-specific challenges and responses to climate change a priority. The Ministry’s Development Policy Action Plan on Gender (2009–2012) calls for the elaboration of gender-sensitive and gender-differentiated strategies for adaptation to climate change, as well as improvements in the provision of related information.

  • Community-based adaptation to climate change

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    All communities have the right to contribute to climate adaptation strategies. This issue of Participatory Learning and Action was produced by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) to coincide with the 2009 COP 15 and surrounding events. The publication aims to facilitate learning and experience-sharing around community-based adaptation (CBA) approaches that empower poor and marginalised communities and build on local knowledge and coping strategies.

  • CARE International Climate Change Brief: Adaptation, gender and women’s empowerment

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Friday 1 January 2010
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    Vulnerability to climate change is determined, in large part, by people's adaptive capacity. A particular climate hazard, such as a drought, does not affect all people within a community – or even the same household – equally because some have greater capacity than others to manage the crisis. This working brief looks at why gender is central to CARE's understanding of and response to the impacts of climate change.

  • Gender Equity and Renewable Energies

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2004
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Can renewable energies contribute to gender equity so that women and men benefit fairly from access to energy services? This paper argues that providing improved access to energy services for lighting, cooking and productive activities should alleviate time and work pressures for women. It should also have a significant positive effect on women’s education, literacy, nutrition, health, economic opportunities and involvement in community affairs, which, in turn, will benefit all family members.

  • Gender and Climate Change – Case Study of Oko Agbon Odooyi Community

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Friday 1 January 2010
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    What are the gender implications of poverty, unemployment and the absence of basic infrastructure in the face of climate change, and what should governments be doing to improve the situation? This paper considers the case of Oko Agbon, a poor coastal community of 10,000 inhabitants in Lagos State, which is facing the challenge of climate change, with rising temperatures and fresh water becoming salinised (salted).

  • Gender, Water, and Climate Change in Sonora, Mexico: implications for policies and programmes on agricultural income-generation

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    This study seeks to understand the threat of climate change for female farmers in two Mexican communities (Terrenate, population 343, and San Ignacio, population 720) in the northern Mexican state of Sonora.

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