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Gender

Gender

Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change in situations of poverty, and their needs must therefore be addressed to ensure efficient and equitable climate mitigation and adaptation. Including women in climate decision-making allows for more efficient planning as women are best equipped to understand the impact they are experiencing themselves. As technology is not gender neutral, working with climate technologies requires that consideration be taken to ensure that women are included in decision-making processes, use of technologies, and benefit from the outcomes of technologies. Below you will find related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring this topic further.  

Gender

  • Gender, IFIs and the global food crisis case study: Zambia

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday 1 October 2012
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    With 63% of Zambians living on less than $1.25 per day, poverty and food security are widespread. This case study argues that International Financial Institutions (IFIs) have contributed to this food insecurity due to neoliberal structural adjustment programmes in the late 1980's. Lower wages, higher unemployment and increased food prices led to widespread malnutrition and political unrest, a process which disproportionately affected women.

  • Food and nutrition security, health and gender equality: partnerships for climate-resilient sustainable development

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Friday 1 June 2012
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    This policy brief provides key recommendations with a view to RIO+20 and the post 2015 MDG agenda. It argues that food and nutrition security, climate change, health, gender equality and environmental degradation are closely interlinked, requiring integrated strategies. Increasing women's engagement, empowerment and leadership can help counter these challenges. There are five key messages presented: - A gender-responsive and human rights approach is required to ensure health and food and nutrition security.

  • Enhancing women’s leadership to address the challenges of climate change on nutrition security and health

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
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    Climate change affects all the basic determinants of health, including food, shelter, water and air. More specifically, it will exacerbate the under nutrition crisis through a lack of access to sufficient, safe and adequate food at household level; maternal and child care and feeding practices; inappropriate access to health services and the lack of a healthy environment. Women are key agents at household and community levels through their roles in care, agriculture, food and nutrition security, health care and disaster risk reduction.

  • Women and Children’s Health: PMNCH Knowledge Summary 18 on nutrition

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
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    Gender inequality is linked to higher rates of child mortality and malnutrition. Women often have less education, lower economic status, and limited decision-making at household and community levels, all of which contributes to poorer nutrition. Women’s status often determines maternal and child feeding practices as well as how food is consumed and distributed within the household.

  • Forum Social Mondial Dakar 2011: Souveraineté alimentaire et équité de genre (World Social Forum Dakar 2011: Food security and gender equality)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
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    Approach: 

    African women are involved in the whole food chain; women farmers are responsible for food production but also contribute to the production of cash crops. They remain responsible for tasks that are modernising very slowly and have suffered setbacks in public policy. Access to land, household energy, drinking water, transport, education and health remains precarious in rural areas. Women are active in the processing and marketing of foods, including local produce. They are also still responsible for the preparation of family meals and for ensuring that their children are not malnourished.

  • Gender, nutrition and the right to adequate food

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
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    The Department of Gender and Nutrition at the University of Hohenheim and the International Secretariat of the FoodFirst Information Action Network are developing a focused approach on gender, nutrition and the human right to adequate food. In 2011 they held a workshop to present their work and to initiate public discussion with representatives from international human rights bodies. This workshop report reflects discussions from that day. It documents the opening remarks from university staff and from Olivier de Schutter, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food.

  • Gender and Nutrition: FAO draft issue paper

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday 1 October 2012
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    This draft issue paper was prepared by FAO in October 2012 as a working document before submission to and discussion within the UNSCN with a view to developing consensual briefs for non-specialists on crosscutting issues impacting food and nutrition security. The paper seeks to discuss the main links between gender and nutrition, highlighting opportunities for increased synergy, and provide recommendations for improved policies, programming and projects.

  • Nutrition: nutrition of women in the preconception period, during pregnancy and the breastfeeding period

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
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    This report argues that taking a life cycle approach and securing good nutritional status for women across the life course will in the long term reduce child underweight and stunting. It argues that around 30% of all women aged 15 to 49 years are thought to be anaemic, and the highest proportions of these anaemic women live in Africa and South East Asia. The prevalence of anaemia in adolescent girls is thought to be even higher.

  • World Food Programme Gender Assessment Brief

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    In 2010 the World Food Programme (WFP) conducted a gender assessment to inform WFP’s Bangladesh Country Strategy and Country Programme for 2012 – 2016. This brief assessment provided a set of programme specific and cross-sectoral recommendations to improve and sustain gendered aware thinking in WFP projects and programmes. For example, in maternal and child nutrition activities it was found that mother-in laws have extensive decision-making power over the preparation, sharing and storage of food in the household.

  • Addressing the gender gap in agriculture: opportunities for collaboration in gender-responsive research

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
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    This workshop report by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research’s (CGIAR) Gender and Agriculture Research Network identifies opportunities for cross programme collaboration to enhance CGIAR’s contribution to reducing gender inequities and promoting agricultural development. Discussion topics at the workshop included an emphasis on good quality gender analysis and associated tools to assist in the analysis.

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