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Gender

Gender

Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change in situations of poverty, and their needs must therefore be addressed to ensure efficient and equitable climate mitigation and adaptation. Including women in climate decision-making allows for more efficient planning as women are best equipped to understand the impact they are experiencing themselves. As technology is not gender neutral, working with climate technologies requires that consideration be taken to ensure that women are included in decision-making processes, use of technologies, and benefit from the outcomes of technologies. Below you will find related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring this topic further.  

Gender

  • Alterra, Stichting DLO

    Knowledge partner
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    Organisation
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    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Alterra is part of Stichting DLO. It is a private sector, research and academic not for profit institution. Alterra offers a combination of practical, innovative and interdisciplinary scientific research across many disciplines related to the green world around us and the sustainable use of our living environment. Aspects of our environment that Alterra focuses on include soil, water, the atmosphere, the landscape and biodiversity ‒ on a global scale as well as regionally. 

  • Building resilience to environmental change by transforming gender relations

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    Publication
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    Thursday 1 May 2014
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    This briefing is based on a workshop which brought together researchers and practitioners to discuss why gender relations are still largely absent from debates on climate change and disasters, what misconceptions may exist, and to define the broad lines of a forward-looking action research agenda.

  • Choice, not control: Why limiting the fertility of poor populations will not solve the climate crisis

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    Publication
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    Monday 1 September 2014
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    This discussion paper argues that strengthening women’s and girls’ reproductive rights is vital for equitable development and must be a priority, regardless of a country’s population growth and carbon footprint.

  • Are Women the Key to Sustainable Development?

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    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 April 2010
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    Progress in achieving the sustainable development goals has been very slow, so has been progress in achieving gender equality. Is there a link between these two trends? The three pillars of sustainable development - social, environment and economic – are also relevant to discussions of gender equality. An increasing number of studies indicate that gender inequalities are extracting high economic costs and leading to social inequities and environmental degradation around the world. This paper reviews the findings of the existing body of gender research on the subject.

  • Gender Equality and New Technologies

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    Publication
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    Thursday 1 January 2004
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    Why is agricultural biotechnology an important development and human rights issue for women? This fact sheet highlights the importance of agricultural biotechnology for gender equality and development, focusing on genetic modification (GM). It illustrates some of its existing and potential uses in agriculture, explores some of the risks associated with GM, and identifies issues relevant to women's human rights.

  • Gender and Agroforestry in Africa: are Women Participating?

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
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    This paper presents the findings of a review undertaken on gender and the adoption of agroforestry in Africa. The concept of gender as used in this paper is not about women, but rather as an organising principle in society, which is used as a process and practice of taking into account the differences between men and women in the course of designing and implementing development projects.

  • Land Rights and Food Security: the linkages Between Secure Land Rights, Women and Improved Household Security and Nutrition

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
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    As governments, the private sector, multilateral institutions, and international development organisations weigh the options for improving food security around the world, they must consider one of the most promising elements for addressing the needs of the world’s hungry and malnourished: secure land rights. Addressing land rights issues—in particular, women’s land rights—in programmes and policies designed to address food security and nutrition through agriculture can deepen the impact of those interventions and lead to improved development outcomes.

  • Addressing Gender in Climate-Smart Smallholder Agriculture

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    Publication
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    Tuesday 1 January 2013
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    This four-page policy brief focuses on the constraints that women face to more equitable participation in smallholder carbon and climate-smart initiatives. It highlights the important role that a flexible learning approach plays in advancing equity goals, and offers recommendations for concrete actions that can empower both women and men.

    Key policy recommendations include:

  • Ixpiyakok Women’s Association, Guatemala.

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday 1 January 2013
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    Ixpiyakok Women’s Association (Associación de Mujeres Ixpiyakok - ADEMI) brings together 30 groups of Maya women in Chimaltenango to improve local food security and nutrition through organic family farms and seed banks. Originally launched as a credit and savings programme for local women, the association has expanded into health and education service provision, as well as advocacy for women’s rights.

  • HUNGaMA: Fighting hunger and malnutrition: The HUNGaMA Survey Report – 2011

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    Publication
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    Saturday 1 January 2011
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    Approach: 

    The HUNGaMA (Hunger and Malnutrition) Survey conducted across 112 rural districts of India in 2011 provides reliable estimates of child nutrition covering nearly 20 percent of Indian children. Its objective was to understand the current situation and provide a basis for focused action. The idea of this survey was triggered by the Citizens’ Alliance against Malnutrition - a group of young leaders, most of them young parliamentarians - in the context of a wide gap in current data and knowledge on child malnutrition in India.

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