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Gender

Gender

Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change in situations of poverty, and their needs must therefore be addressed to ensure efficient and equitable climate mitigation and adaptation. Including women in climate decision-making allows for more efficient planning as women are best equipped to understand the impact they are experiencing themselves. As technology is not gender neutral, working with climate technologies requires that consideration be taken to ensure that women are included in decision-making processes, use of technologies, and benefit from the outcomes of technologies. Below you will find related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring this topic further.  

Gender

  • Pakistan

    Technology Guidance and Support for Conducting the Technology Needs Assessment (TNA)

    Type: 
    Technical Assistance
    Date of submission: 
    Friday 26 September 2014
    Phase: 
    Completed
    Countries: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    This Technology Transfer Advances Pakistan's

    • Nationally Determined Contribution which is rooted in Vision 2025 of Pakistan – a roadmap of economic growth, social inclusion and sustainable development. It is also aligned with the country’s continued commitment to the issue of climate change as reflected in the National Climate Change Policy as well as national policies on agriculture, power, energy, energy efficiency, water and other sectors.

    Context

  • Econoler

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise: 

    Econoler is a private sector consulting firm established in 1981 with the mission to provide quality energy efficiency and renewable energy professional services while respecting sustainable development principles. Econoler is specialized in energy efficiency and has more than 30 years of experience in this specific field of expertise.

  • Alterra, Stichting DLO

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Alterra is part of Stichting DLO. It is a private sector, research and academic not for profit institution. Alterra offers a combination of practical, innovative and interdisciplinary scientific research across many disciplines related to the green world around us and the sustainable use of our living environment. Aspects of our environment that Alterra focuses on include soil, water, the atmosphere, the landscape and biodiversity ‒ on a global scale as well as regionally. 

  • The Women and Gender Constituency

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Knowledge Partner

    The Women and Gender Constituency (WGC) is one of the nine stakeholder groups of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Established in 2009, the WGC now consists of 27 women’s and environmental civil society organizations, who are working to ensure that women’s voices are heard and their rights prioritized in the fight against climate change.

  • Environment: Strengthening Women's Organisations in Community Development

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday 1 June 1998
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    A case study of the Aga Khan Rural Support Programme in Pakistan analysing the role of women's organisations (WOs)in community development, and providing suggestions regarding how they might be strengthened.

  • Participatory Action Learning in Practice: Experience of a Rapid Participatory Review of ANANDI, India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Wednesday 1 January 2003
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    How can a Participatory Action Learning System (PALS) help to empower women? ANANDI, a non-governmental organisation (NGO) based in Gujarat, India, successfully used PALS to support women from poor and marginalised groups to identify, analyse and solve their own problems. Women assessed their levels of poverty and food security and spoke for the first time about personal experiences of domestic violence. They explained that empowerment for them meant having a livelihood, doing men's work, having livestock, and visiting the panchayat (village council) office.

  • "We Know What We Need!" South Asian Women Speak Out On Climate Change Adaptation

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 December 2007
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Poor women in Bangladesh, India and Nepal are struggling to protect their lives, homes, assets and livelihoods from weather-related hazards caused by climate change. Nevertheless, women are not passive victims of climate change. This report presents field research conducted in the Ganga river basin in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal, with poor women in rural areas. Participatory research tools were used to explore: the impact of changing monsoon and flooding patterns on their livelihoods; existing coping strategies; constraints to adaptation; and adaptation priorities (i.e.

  • Farmers in a changing climate: does gender matter?

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Friday 1 January 2010
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Is there a strong gender dimension to experiences with climate variability and coping strategies? This publication on the topic of food security in Andrha Pradesh, India finds that there is. It is a report on a study carried out by the Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), with financing from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida). The research was undertaken in six villages in two drought-prone districts: Mahbudnagar and Anantapur in Andhra Pradesh, India.

  • Climate Change and Gender Justice

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Awareness of the complex and dynamic links between gender relations and climate change is growing fast in gender and development (GAD) circles and among women’s rights activists, but in mainstream policies they still tend to be overlooked. This book offers information and evidence towards a more informed, nuanced gender perspective in the context of climate change.

  • Gender and Development In Brief ‘Gender and Climate Change’ – edition 22

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday 1 November 2011
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Climate change is increasingly being recognised as a global crisis, but responses to it have so far been overly focused on scientific and economic solutions. How then do we move towards morepeople-centred, gender-aware climate change policies and processes? How do we respond to the different needs and concerns of women and men, and also challenge the gender inequalities that mean women are more likely to lose out than men in the face of climate change? This In Brief sets out why it is vital to address the gender dimensions of climate change.

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