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Gender

Gender

Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change in situations of poverty, and their needs must therefore be addressed to ensure efficient and equitable climate mitigation and adaptation. Including women in climate decision-making allows for more efficient planning as women are best equipped to understand the impact they are experiencing themselves. As technology is not gender neutral, working with climate technologies requires that consideration be taken to ensure that women are included in decision-making processes, use of technologies, and benefit from the outcomes of technologies. Below you will find related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring this topic further.  

Gender

  • ECOWAS women and energy

    Mainstreaming gender for a climate resilient energy system in West Africa

    Type: 
    Technical Assistance
    Date of submission: 
    Friday 29 January 2016
    Phase: 
    Completed
    Countries: 
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    This Technology Transfer Advances

  • Alterra, Stichting DLO

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Alterra is part of Stichting DLO. It is a private sector, research and academic not for profit institution. Alterra offers a combination of practical, innovative and interdisciplinary scientific research across many disciplines related to the green world around us and the sustainable use of our living environment. Aspects of our environment that Alterra focuses on include soil, water, the atmosphere, the landscape and biodiversity ‒ on a global scale as well as regionally. 

  • Econoler

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise: 

    Econoler is a private sector consulting firm established in 1981 with the mission to provide quality energy efficiency and renewable energy professional services while respecting sustainable development principles. Econoler is specialized in energy efficiency and has more than 30 years of experience in this specific field of expertise.

  • The Women and Gender Constituency

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Knowledge Partner

    The Women and Gender Constituency (WGC) is one of the nine stakeholder groups of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Established in 2009, the WGC now consists of 27 women’s and environmental civil society organizations, who are working to ensure that women’s voices are heard and their rights prioritized in the fight against climate change.

  • Trade Liberalization: Impacts on African Women

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Wednesday 1 August 2001
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Trade liberalisation processes impact differently on men and women due to the fact that men and women have different roles in production. Despite the fact that women are actively involved in international trade, WTO agreements are gender blind and as such have adverse impacts on women. The General Agreement in Trade and Service (GATS), for instance, provides for a level playing field in service provision between big foreign owned companies and small locally owned companies.

  • Gender and climate adaptation: tools for community-level action in Nigeria

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    In Africa, as in many parts of the world, the impact of climate change is visible and widespread...Such impacts combined with high dependence on natural resources and rain-fed agriculture mean that many African countries, including Nigeria, face high vulnerability in the coming decades. Poverty, inequitable land distribution, conflict, HIV/AIDS and debt also mean that many African countries lack the adaptive capacity to cope and adjust compared to more developed countries.

  • Gender inequality and maternal and child nutrition in Northern Nigeria

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 May 2014
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    This summary provides an overview of how gender inequality impacts maternal and child nutrition in Northern Nigeria.

  • Levelling the field: improving opportunities for women farmers in Africa

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Wednesday 1 January 2014
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    While agriculture across sub-Saharan Africa forms the backbone of many nations' economies, women are largely locked out of land ownership, access to credit and productive farm inputs, as well as support from extension services. This report seeks to focus international attention on the impediments that African women farmers face, presenting the clearest evidence to date on the breadth and depth of the resulting gender gap in agricultural production.

  • Gender roles in urban crop production in Imo State, Nigeria

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday 1 January 2013
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    Promoting urban agriculture has become important in developing countries as a strategy for poverty alleviation. This study, done in Imo state, Nigeria, aims to understand the agricultural practices and associated gender dynamics in developing countries. The results show that a noticeable majority of urban farmers are females of mean age (40 years old). Mixed crop cultivation is the primary cropping system used with Cassava, with maize and Telfaria being the top three food crops grown.

  • Where energy is women's business: national and regional reports from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday 1 January 2007
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    In the introduction to this publication, ENERGIA policy advisor and editor of this pubication Gail Karlsson writes, “In many developing countries, especially in the poorest areas, most energy currently comes from traditional biomass fuels such as wood, charcoal and agricultural wastes - and collection and managing these fuels is strictly ‘women’s business’.” She calls on national energy and development policy-makers to acknowledge the links between women’s work, national economics and energy; as well as make more gender-focused investments and initiatives, with greater and more diverse invo

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