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Gender

Gender

Women commonly face higher risks and greater burdens from the impacts of climate change in situations of poverty, and their needs must therefore be addressed to ensure efficient and equitable climate mitigation and adaptation. Including women in climate decision-making allows for more efficient planning as women are best equipped to understand the impact they are experiencing themselves. As technology is not gender neutral, working with climate technologies requires that consideration be taken to ensure that women are included in decision-making processes, use of technologies, and benefit from the outcomes of technologies. Below you will find related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring this topic further.  

Gender

  • Tanzania Renewable Energy Association

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
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    Network Member
    TA proponent
    Sector(s) of expertise: 

    Tanzania Renewable Energy Association (TAREA), formerly TASEA (Tanzania Solar Energy Association) is a non-profit making, non-governmental Organization established in 2000 with a mission  to promote and advocate the increased use of Renewable Energy by developing an effective network of members and stakeholders, emphasizing the need for quality and best practice throughout the sector. TAREA brings together actors to promote the accessibility and use of renewable energies in Tanzania Mainland.

  • Econoler

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
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    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise: 

    Econoler is a private sector consulting firm established in 1981 with the mission to provide quality energy efficiency and renewable energy professional services while respecting sustainable development principles. Econoler is specialized in energy efficiency and has more than 30 years of experience in this specific field of expertise.

  • Alterra, Stichting DLO

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Alterra is part of Stichting DLO. It is a private sector, research and academic not for profit institution. Alterra offers a combination of practical, innovative and interdisciplinary scientific research across many disciplines related to the green world around us and the sustainable use of our living environment. Aspects of our environment that Alterra focuses on include soil, water, the atmosphere, the landscape and biodiversity ‒ on a global scale as well as regionally. 

  • mfarmPay: Driving Climate Financing to Rural Smallholder African Farmers

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday 8 January 2019

    Smallholder farmers and lenders with smallholder lending portfolios ( which according to CGAP currently account for about USD 50 billion globally) are highly vulnerable to climate change impacts. mfarmPay, a novel parametric lending solution driving financing to African farmers, offers innovative data-driven solution to reducing climate risk in lending portfolios and incentivising the adoption of climate-smart farming approaches by smallholder food producers.

  • Promoting productive gendered spaces for adapting to climatic stress: Two case studies from rural Bangladesh

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday 1 December 2014
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    This policy brief highlights how sensitivity to access to specific assets and constraints experienced by women (in particular local contexts) can help realise their potential of becoming important actors in adapting local food production to climatic stress.

  • Gender: A key dimension linking agricultural programs to improved nutrition and health

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Empirical evidence shows that increasing women’s control over land, physical assets, and financial assets serves to raise agricultural productivity, improve child health and nutrition, and increase expenditures on education, as women are more likely than men to spend income on food, healthcare and the education of their children.

  • Weathering the Storm: Girls and Climate Change

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
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    Approach: 

    How do girls experience climate change in Ethiopia and Bangladesh? This report, based on participatory research in the two countries, argues that programmes and policies that do not recognise the different ways in which girls and boys are affected by climate change risk exacerbating pre-existing gender inequalities and are failing to tackle one of the root causes of vulnerability to climate risk.

  • Gender and Climate change: Regional Report Executive Summary

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 January 2011
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    What are the gendered impacts of climate change at household level in Sub Saharan Africa? How can the capacity of women and men be strengthened to better adapt to climate change and climate variability? This executive summary provides an analysis of the findings of eight case studies carried out in Botswana, Namibia, Mozambique and South Africa. It finds that women cope better with the impacts of changing circumstances than men, as women are more likely to explore opportunities that enable them to cope better.

  • Gender, Class and Access to Water: Three Cases in a Poor and Crowded Delta

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2006
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    Approach: 

    Water plays a pivotal role in economic activity and in human well-being. It is essential to food production and in domestic use (drinking, washing, and cooking). Yet the social relations which determine access to, and use of, water are poorly understood. Conflict over water may have far-reaching consequences on social change. This article introduces a framework for analysing different factors in accessing water and applies it to three related issues in Bangladesh. First, extraction of groundwater for irrigation has made many drinking-water hand pumps run dry.

  • Gender and Climate Hazards in Bangladesh

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday 1 July 2002
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Bangladesh has experienced a number of high-profile disasters, including cyclones and annual floods. Vulnerability to disasters in Bangladesh correlates strongly with poverty, and it is widely accepted that women make up a disproportionate share of poor people. If there is no significant progress in reducing poverty, then it can be assumed that women will become increasingly affected by the impact of hazards. This paper asks how vulnerability is affected by gender relations, and looks at the different vulnerabilities of men and women in relation to disasters in Bangladesh.

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