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Economics and financial decision-making

economics and decision making

In order to achieve ambitious national climate goals, the use of economic instruments such as crop and climate insurance, taxes, feed-in tariffs for renewable energy and other financial incentives are important enablers. The CTCN is collaborating with relevant stakeholders to support local entrepreneurs, small- and medium enterprises and larger businesses, as well as governmental decision-makers, in identifying these economic instruments. Furthermore the CTCN provides technical assistance for strengthening countries’ capacity to access international financing for climate technology opportunities. Below you will find related publications, partners, CTCN technical assistance, technologies and other information for exploring this topic further.  

Economics and financial decision-making

  • Understanding Integration Aspects: Renewable Power and Energy Fractions

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2017
    Objective: 

    This paper introduces the Renewable Power Fraction and Renewable Energy Fraction as self-defining metrics to quantify and visualise the performance of renewable generators versus the total load, and show how corresponding Fossil or Demand Side Management Power and Energy Fractions can similarly be defined.

  • mfarmPay: Driving Climate Financing to Rural Smallholder African Farmers

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday 8 January 2019

    Smallholder farmers and lenders with smallholder lending portfolios ( which according to CGAP currently account for about USD 50 billion globally) are highly vulnerable to climate change impacts. mfarmPay, a novel parametric lending solution driving financing to African farmers, offers innovative data-driven solution to reducing climate risk in lending portfolios and incentivising the adoption of climate-smart farming approaches by smallholder food producers.

  • Tracking climate change funding: learning from gender-responsive budgeting

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Friday 1 August 2014
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    This paper looks at what budgeting for climate change initiatives can learn from gender-responsive budgeting (GRB).

  • Unshackling women traders: cross-border trade of Eru from Cameroon to Nigeria

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday 1 June 2013
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 
    Approach: 

    Eru, a vegetable found in the forest, plays an important role in trade between countries in West and Central Africa, especially between Cameroon and Nigeria. This note analyses the environment for trade in Eru as an example of a high value non-wood forest product (NWFP) that has a great potential both in terms of exports but also for income generating activities. Women are heavily involved in Eru trade as both harvesters and small-scale traders. It is a key means for many women to diversify the income stream of their household and reduce their financial dependence on men.

  • Take 11 Key Steps Towards Gender and Climate Justice

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday 1 January 2007
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    This position paper, prepared by the GenderCC Network for the 2007 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties (COP) 13 meeting in Bali, Indonesia, brings together ideas from women’s organisations and gender experts from around the world for the effective mainstreaming of gender dimensions into climate change adaptation and mitigation processes.

  • 'The Clean Development Mechanism’, Briefs on Gender and Climate Funds

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    The CDM, established by the Kyoto Protocol, has been highly effective in identifying and funding cost-effective opportunities to reduce emissions. However, it has been widely criticised for prioritising emissions reductions over sustainable development. This brief explores ways of ensuring that CDM initiatives contribute to local development and enhance opportunities for projects to meet local women’s and men’s needs. There are a number of suggestions, including:

  • ‘Climate Investment Funds’, Briefs on Gender and Climate Funds

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    According to this brief, the current pledge to invest 80 per cent of Climate Investment Funds (CIFs) in male-dominated formal-economy work sectors, energy and transportation may perpetuate existing gender imbalances in climate change funding. For CIFs to have a positive impact on gender issues, this document recommends that urgent action be taken while these funds are in their early stages. Comparing the CIFs’ two main components – the Clean Technology Fund (CTF) and the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF) – the brief notes that the SCF offers more in prioritising the needs of poorer people.

  • ‘Adaptation Fund’, Briefs on Gender and Climate Funds

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    This brief recognises that the equal involvement of women and men in all levels of adaptation planning efforts is needed to ensure that policy, programmes and projects address socially and culturally specific climate change impacts. The brief calls for raising awareness of the Adaptation Fund, particularly among national women’s machineries. The Fund’s governance and financing instruments provide entry points for developing countries to play the leading roles.

  • ‘Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation’, Briefs on Gender and Climate Funds

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Women often play critical roles in forest management, and their unique knowledge and skills can help REDD mechanisms and projects become more effective, equitable and sustainable. At the time this brief was written, the international mechanisms for REDD were being negotiated. The brief emphasises the need to consider the gendered impacts of REDD’s financial resource structures, and the ways in which financing is allocated, managed and delivered. It argues that these processes hold new possibilities to engage and reward women for their forest stewardship.

  • Doubling the Damage: World Bank Climate Investment Funds Undermine Climate and Gender Justice

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2009
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    Possible damage could arise from the CIFs. Specifically, this report points to the overall lack of gender perspectives in the funding, planning and implementation of similar World Bank projects to date. The paper draws attention to the disproportionate impact of climate change on poor people, and particularly women. It is critical of the lack of effort to involve women in consultations and policy processes that have resulted in initiatives such as the CIFs.

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