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Stoichiometric Direct-Injection Compression-Ignition Engine

Technology:

Background: This engine concept is suitable for heavy-duty operation while utilizing a wide range of fuels. It will provide high power and high efficiency while meeting emissions standards without expensive exhaust after-treatment. This engine would be an improvement over Diesel engines currently used in trucks in terms of both emissions and power. Ultimately it could be the most common engine design in heavy-duty transportation since it can be cheaper more powerful and more efficient than competing technologies. Description: Stanford researchers have designed a stoichiometric direct-injection compression-ignition engine which allows the use of neat alternative fuels such as methanol ethanol dimethyl ether or natural gas in a manner that provides maximal power output. This engine will provide high power and high efficiency while meeting emissions standards without expensive exhaust after-treatment. Proven three-way catalyst technology is employed to provide the lowest level of gaseous pollutants possible. This engine would be an improvement over heavy-duty engines currently used in trucks in terms of both emissions and power. Stage of Research: Experimental data using methanol and ethanol has proven low soot emission (below gov’t regulation limits) ~30% higher power and torque and high combustion efficiency of 96% at stoichiometric conditions. Applications: 1) Heavy 2) Duty engines particularly for long 3) Range ground transportation 4) Marine and locomotive engines 5) Stationary power generation 6) Applicable to any situation that requires a high-power density engine with low emissions

Benefits:

1) Much cheaper emissions control system than a conventional Diesel engine (about $1K as opposed to $15K). 2) 30% higher power and torque output due to the higher fuel loading. This is especially significant since some trucks are currently being retrofitted with port-injected natural gas engines which actually have a lower power output than current engines. 3) Can utilize a wide range of low sooting alternative fuels such as alcohols and natural gas in a way that is suitable for heavy-duty operation. 4) More efficient than current engines due to reduced heat transfer losses.

Date of release: