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Vector-borne diseases

Vector-borne diseases are illnesses caused by pathogens and parasites in human populations. Every year there are more than 1 billion cases and over 1 million deaths from vector-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue, schistosomiasis, human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and onchocerciasis, globally.

Vector-borne diseases

  • National and regional impacts of climate change on malaria by 2030

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    This paper analyses impacts of climate change on malaria transmission at the national and regional level in India, with emphasis on the Himalayan region, northeastern states, the Western Ghats and coastal areas under the aegis of NATCOM II and the up Indian Network for Climate Change Assessment (INCCA). It seeks to elicit the most vulnerable areas of malaria due to climate change and pave the way for identifying remedial measures for addressing the potential threat in the country.

  • El Niño and health

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    The El Niño phenomenon, whereby warmer than usual ocean water develops in the central and east-central equatorial Pacific, affects rainfall patterns and temperatures in many parts of the globe. This occurs most intensely in the tropics, and with significant impacts on human health.

  • Climate and health country profile: Colombia

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    Publication
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    This Colombian country profile identifies areas for action,formulated in 11 specific regional adaptation plans. Efforts are concentrated in the most vulnerable areas of the country.

    Colombia is a country of diverse geography and climatic regions including tropical rainforests, savannas, steppes, deserts and mountainous areas.

    In terms of population health, Colombia has made continued progress in attainment of the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs).

  • The HIV/AIDS epidemic in South Africa: convergence with tuberculosis, socioecological vulnerability, and climate change patterns

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    This journal article argues that people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have weakened physiological responses and are immunologically vulnerable to pathogens and stressors in their environment, putting them at a health disadvantage in climate-based rising temperatures, water scarcity, air pollution, potential water- and vector-borne disease outbreaks, and habitat redistributions. It is argued that coupled with HIV/AIDS, climate change threatens ecological biodiversity via a larger-scale socioeconomic recourse to natural resources.

  • Institut de recherche pour le développement

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    France
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    IRD - Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (Research Institute for Development) - is a research organization based in France that is working with its partners in the South to address international development issues. Improving health, understanding social changes, and protecting the environment are the main pillars of its work towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). IRD work includes interdisciplinary scientific research, capacity building and nurturing innovation in more than fifty countries worldwide. 

  • New Class of Mosquitocide

    Type: 
    Product

    Technology Description: Numerous diseases are spread by mosquitoes. One example Dengue virus is a mosquito born virus that infects ~250 million humans per year. The spread of mosquito-borne diseases can be restricted by decreasing mosquito populations in areas of high pathogen transmission. The new technology developed is a compound developed using thiopyran methodology that has a unique hit in mosquito assays. The novel compound FL-II-185 is a new class of mosquito selective inhibitor of blood feeding female mosquitoes.

  • Autodissemination of an Insect-Growth Regulator for Mosquito Management

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    Product
    Technology:

    Rutgers scientists have developed an insecticide (e.g pyriproxyfen) autodissemination station that topically contaminates oviposition-seeking mosquitoes in such a manner that the mosquitoes then bring the active control agent back to their breeding locations for control of container-inhabiting mosquitoes in urban environments particularly the Asian tiger mosquito.