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Peat carbon management

Peat carbon management

  • Sistema Agroforestal Quesungual: Una Buena Practica de Adaptacion al Cambio Climatico

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    In Central America, one of the major changes in land use is the conversion of natural vegetation to crops (mainly to grazing lands). The practice of slash and burn agriculture has led to a decline in soil quality through nutrients depletion, organic matter reduction and soil erosion. Land degradation problems and desertification have increased with climate variability. Climate change represents an additional threat that could affect a country"s ability to meet urgent demands for rural development--food security included.

  • Energy poverty and climate change mitigation in Ghana: An economic assessment

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    Produced for the Development and Mitigation Forum in Cape Town, January 2014, this paper presents an economic assessment of energy poverty and climate change mitigation in Ghana. The paper summarises the current state of energy use, related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy poverty, and mitigation, and estimates their likely trends and subsequent future impacts.

  • Peatland: Guidance for Climate Change Mitigation through Conservation, Rehabilitation and Sustainable Use

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    This report provides information on management and finance options to achieve emissions reductions and enhance other vital ecosystem services from peatlands. A decision support tree guides users through options for the management of both cultivated and uncultivated peatlands. The report also summarizes the methodologies and data available for quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from peatlands and organic soils. Practical approaches are presented concerning measuring, reporting and verification, and accounting of greenhouse gas emissions.

  • Fact sheet. Project: Alternative energy sources and efficient utilizatio n of biomass energy to reduce depletion of carbon sinks and improve livelihoods in rural areas of Tanzania

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    The project was implemented in Lingeka and Nyanza villages in the Meatu District, Shinyanga region. The main goal was to improve livelihoods for poor rural households, with a special focus on women. The core problem addressed was the lack of reliable and clean energy for lighting and inefficient use of biomass for heating and cooking. Women and girls are the most affected by indoor air pollution and burden of collecting firewood. The project addressed the problem by introducing solar home lighting systems (SHS) and energy efficient stoves.

  • Colombia: San Nicolas Carbon Sequestration Project

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    The development objective of the San Nicolas Carbon Sink and Arboreal Species Recovery Project is to pioneer carbon sinks in Colombia, through reforestation and agroforestry , on about 2,500 ha of abandoned pastures and through avoided deforestation and induced regeneration in about 7,300 ha of remaining forest stands in the valley of San Nicolas. The project also seeks to protect biodiversity through the recovery of endangered and vulnerable local arboreal species.

  • CO: Caribbean Savannah Carbon Sink project

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    The objective of the Caribbean Savannah Carbon Sink Project in Colombia is to pilot the use of carbon sinks (through sylvo-pastoral and reforestation systems) as a tool to arrest the process of land degradation in the coastal plains of the country (focused on 2200 ha of the Caribbean Savannah ecosystem).

  • Climate mitigation finance across developing countries: what are the major determinants?

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    This empirical study assesses the relationship between the characteristics of developing countries and the amount of official climate mitigation finance inflow. The results show that developing countries with higher CO2 intensity, larger carbon sinks, lower per capita gross domestic product (GDP) and good governance tend to be selected as recipients of climate mitigation finance, and receive more of it. CO2 emission is not used as a determinant of mitigation finance until the actual financial disbursement.

  • Indonesian peatland fires: Perceptions of solutions

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    Indonesia’s recurrent peatland fires generate toxic haze and release globally significant amounts of greenhouse gases, with severe impacts on public health and economy within Indonesia and neighboring  countries (e.g. Malaysia, Singapore).

    This flyer presents a collaborative research endeavor between CIFOR, the Lancaster Environment Centre and the University of Cambridge on diverse stakeholder perceptions of the costs and benefits of the peatland fires in Riau, and opinions on the effectiveness of prospective solutions.

  • Soil carbon management in large-scale Earth system modelling: implications for crop yields and nitrogen leaching

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    Results demonstrate that the effects of management on cropland can be beneficial for carbon and nutrient retention without risking (large) yield losses.

    Nevertheless, effects on soil carbon are small compared with extant stocks in natural and semi-natural ecosystem types and managed forests.

    While agricultural management can be targeted towards sustainable goals, from a climate change or carbon sink perspective avoiding deforestation or reforestation constitutes a far more effective overall strategy for maintaining and enhancing global carbon sinks.