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Nitric acid

Nitric acid

  • Moist Membranes for Cultivation and Collection of Algae

    Type: 
    Product

    Background: Mass cultivation of algae for biofuel production has focused on the use of open ponds or closed bioreactors. Both approaches depend upon routine liquid culturing of the algae and require the removal of large quantities of water at the time of cell harvesting and subsequent extraction of desired products. This invention proposes the use of porous inert membranes to support the growth and subsequent harvesting of the algae.

  • Seambiotic: renewable energy production

    Type: 
    Product

    Seambiotic is the first in the world with proprietary technology for growing marine microalgae in open ponds using flue gas and recycled seawater from power plant. Seambiotic is also the first in the world to successfully connect directly to a power plant’s smokestack for direct consumption of CO2. The Company currently holds patent applications on the technology. Seambiotic was initially established to produce and sell Omega 3 fatty acid products from marine microalgae.

  • Solar water disinfection

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    It is well documented that solar energy can be an effective means of cleaning contaminated water. This is because ultraviolet (UV) light destroys the formation of DNA linkages in microorganisms, thereby preventing them from reproducing and thus rendering them harmless.

  • the greenwerk. GbR

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The greenwerk. offers climate policy and sustainable energy policy related advice to clients in both developing and developed countries. They navigate public and private actors through different layers of the climate finance landscape and contribute to a global knowledge transfer on climate and energy policy through facilitation of capacity development missions and workshops.

  • Taking action: Progress and challenges in implementing nutrition policies and programs

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    TO BE EFFECTIVE, COMMITMENTS TO ACTION MUST BE IMPLEMENTED AND ENFORCED. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF POLICIES AND INTERVENTIONS DEPENDS on converting political commitment to practical action. How are governments and other stakeholders doing in implementing policies and interventions that reflect commitment?

  • Making SMARTer commitments to nutrition action: Global nutrition report guidance note

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    The Global Nutrition Report, an independent accountability mechanism for progress and action on nutrition, calls on all actors to make SMART Commitments to Nutrition Action—that is, commitments that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time bound. Specifically, we call on governments to make SMART Commitments to Nutrition Action to achieve national nutrition targets and to put in place monitoring systems that allow them and others to assess progress.

  • Global Nutrition Report 2016: From Promise to Impact: Ending Malnutrition by 2030: Summary

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    Few challenges facing the global community today match the scale of malnutrition, a condition that directly affects one in three people. Malnutrition manifests itself in many different ways: as poor child growth and development; as individuals who are skin and bone or prone to infection; as those who are carrying too much weight or who are at risk of chronic diseases because of excess intake of sugar, salt, or fat; or those who are deficient in important vitamins or minerals.

  • Biopolymer production for (petro-)chemical sector

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    A polymer is a large molecule (macromolecule) composed of repeating structural units typically connected by covalent chemical bonds. Examples of synthetic polymers are plastics, Bakelite and nylon, while rubber, proteins, DNA but also spider-silk are naturally occurring polymers or so-called natural bio-based polymers. Reproducing naturally occurring and/or synthetic polymers based on non renewable fossil feedstocks is common practice in the (petro-) chemical industry.