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Glass production

Glass production

  • Introduction to Waste Management and Climate Change

    Type: 
    Webinar
    Date and time:
    Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - Wednesday, February 4, 2015 Europe/Paris

    This webinar highlights the relevance of the waste sector to climate change, provides different technology options, and ways to overcome common barriers faced by developing countries when adopting these waste management technologies.

  • Product component and materials recycling

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    According to the EC (19 November, 2008) “waste means any substance or object which the holder discards or intends or is required to discard.” Recycling materials and products – that are considered waste - is an ancient practice which shows that in times of resource scarcity (i.e. shortage of virgin materials) societies attach more economic and societal value to their own waste. This implies that throughout time the definition of waste can change as well. Generally speaking longer use or re-use of materials and products this is often mainly to cover a society’s needs.

  • Nanoenergetic Materials and Uses Thereof

    Type: 
    Product
    Technology:

    This invention involves applications of the released energy from the self propagation of combustion of nanosynthesized thermites. One area of application is in the semiconductor industry for example in the crystallization of amorphous materials such as amorphous silicon thin film doping of various semiconductor materials and the formation of exotic alloys. Nano synthesized thermites also called MIC produces a shock wave and localized heat which can be used to enhance the process of crystallization.

  • Using UV Light to Functionalize Metal Oxides for Use in Biosensors Solar Cells and Other Devices

    Type: 
    Product
    Technology:

    Functionalized substrates have commercial applications ranging from biosensors to energy conversion devices such as solar cells. Biosensors rapidly detect the presence of target biomolecules based on known interactions between the analytes and other biomolecules immobilized on a substrate. However existing technologies for immobilizing biomolecules are limited by poor repeatability and instability resulting in increased manufacturing costs and short shelf life. Oxide materials particularly TiO2 often are used in energy conversion devices.

  • I-III-VI2 Photovoltaic Absorber Layers With Improved Manufacturing and/or Device Performance by Incorporation of AG AU TL or TE

    Type: 
    Product

    The incorporation of various additional constituents into I-III-VI2-based chalcopyrite absorber layers in particular the introduction of Ag into Cu(InGa)Se2 to form (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers may be used as a means of increasing open-circuit voltage reducing processing temperature and/or improving device performance without otherwise modifying the absorber layer or device fabrication processes.

  • Sunlight-Harvesting Windows for Enhanced Power Generation

    Type: 
    Product
    Technology:

    Nanoparticle-Embedded Glass Redirects Scattered Light to Solar Cells Within Window Frames that Produce Electricity These sunlight-harvesting windows embedded with metal nanoparticles and framed with photovoltaic cells produce four times as much power as other solar windows. In 2014 the United States installed enough solar photovoltaics to power 4 million homes. The growing solar industry now employs nearly 175000 workers more than Google Apple Facebook and Twitter combined.

  • Solar Cell Catalyst for transparent DSSCs

    Type: 
    Product

    This catalyst offers an alternative to ruthenium based catalysts used on dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) technology. These catalysts show promise in providing greater energy conversion as well as the potential for new applications such as transparent solar cells that can be used anywhere clear glass is used. Details: Dr. Louis Barriault of the University of Ottawa’s Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation developed this family of dimeric gold catalysts and demonstrated a current in a small DSSC set up.