Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
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Funding mechanisms

Funding mechanisms

  • New finance for climate change and the environment

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    This paper describes recent developments and trends in global environmental finance. It aims at mapping out the new environmental funds in terms of their objectives, funding and institutional arrangements. The authors also identify factors that seem to be shaping the development of these funds and provide an initial analysis of the potential for duplication, complementarity or synergy between and among new funds.The paper finds the following key issues with regard to international climate change funding:

  • Compensating for climate change: principles and lessons for equitable adaptation funding

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    There are significant gaps between funds pledged and the needs of developing countries struggling to adapt to the impacts of climate change. Additionally, there has been insufficient attention to the question of which funding mechanisms are most appropriate for serving communities affected by climate change.

  • Protecting farmers' rights in the global IPR regime

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    In developing countries, the vast majority of farmers still act as stewards and innovators of genetic diversity and farmers' rights are about enabling this to continue and rewarding them for their contribution to the global genetic pool. This policy brief explores the core challenges and policy options for countries attempting to implement farmers' rights within the context of intellectual property rights (IPRs).The brief identifies three major challenges:

  • Innovation and Diffusion of Green Technologies: The Role of Intellectual Property and Other Enabling Factors

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    Effective responses to climate change require efforts by both the public and private sectors to develop and disseminate new environmentally sound technologies (ESTs) on a global scale, as well as to adapt them to local needs. However, due to a number of market failures and specific uncertainties, the spread of green technologies is less than optimal, which necessitates additional incentives. Based on a review of recent literature, the present Global Challenges

  • Adaptation finance: how can Durban deliver on past promises?

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    This briefing paper by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) is aimed at delegates of the 2011United Nations climate negotiations in Durban, South Africa. It makes clear the responsibilities imparted by previous climate change negotiations and, as the scaling-up period of 2013-2019 approaches, the danger of the widening chasm between word and deed thus far witnessed. The briefing lays out the contrast between five finance promises of previous agreements and the consequential reality.

  • Corruption risks and mitigating approaches in climate finance

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    There are major governance and corruption challenges associated with climate finance, with huge amounts of money from a wide variety of sources flowing through new, complex and relatively untested funding mechanisms at international, national and local levels.

  • Climate finance: developing countries’ perspective

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    Climate finance is vital to help poor and most vulnerable countries cope with the adverse effects of climate change, but it is still a hotly debated issue at the international level. This policy brief investigates key flaws in existing international climate agreements as well as the consequences of excessive climate finance fragmentation.The document notes that adverse climate-related events are on the rise with severe socio-economic consequences in developing countries.