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Fuel cells for stationary applications

Fuel cells for stationary applications

  • Fuel cells for stationary applications

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Fuel cells make it possible to efficiently convert the energy stored in several kinds of gases, among which hydrogen and methane, into electricity. Although the concept, according to which fuel cells operate, was already discovered in 1839 by William Grove, the first development only started in 1932 through Francis Bacon’s exploratory work. It was only in the early 1960s that significant efforts were put into fuel cell development, when NASA decided that fuel cells were to become the principal replacement for batteries in spacecraft (Bacon, 1969 and Schoots et al., 2010).

  • Sub-Micron Electrolyte Thin Film for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Type: 
    Product
    Objective:

    This patented electrolyte fabrication method is designed for deposition of low-cost ultra-thin metal oxide film on a porous substrate. The simple clean process prevents gas crossover and generates a low-resistance electrolyte that can operate temperature below 500oC. This electrolyte could be used to create a high efficiency solid oxide fuel cell. Applications: Solid oxide fuel cells - fabrication of ultra-thin film electrolyte.

  • Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Anode With Greater Fuel Flexibility and More Efficient Power Generation

    Type: 
    Product
    Objective:

    The University of Florida is seeking companies interested in commercializing fuel-cell technology with improved range of use. Fuel cells combine oxygen and fuel to chemically generate electricity without combustion. The domestic market for this innovative energy source could grow to $975 million by the year 2012 according to some studies. Of the many existing fuel-cell technologies solid-oxide fuel cells have the distinct advantage of being able to use fuels other than hydrogen allowing for greater flexibility.

  • Involatile Protic Electrolytes and Ionic Acids for Fuel Cells and Other Applications

    Type: 
    Product
    Objective:

    Background: Currently there is a surge in interest in fuel cell research as companies across the globe race to take advantage of the high energy capacity that fuel cells provide in comparison to other portable electrochemical systems. Many approaches to fuel cell technology use strong acid electrolytes. Such systems suffer from corrosion problems which limit their functional life. Despite significant research in the area there remains a need for higher-performance proton carriers for use in fuel cells.