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Fuel cells for stationary applications

Fuel cells for stationary applications

  • Fuel cells for stationary applications

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Fuel cells make it possible to efficiently convert the energy stored in several kinds of gases, among which hydrogen and methane, into electricity. Although the concept, according to which fuel cells operate, was already discovered in 1839 by William Grove, the first development only started in 1932 through Francis Bacon’s exploratory work. It was only in the early 1960s that significant efforts were put into fuel cell development, when NASA decided that fuel cells were to become the principal replacement for batteries in spacecraft (Bacon, 1969 and Schoots et al., 2010).

  • Nano-patterning of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrolytes

    Type: 
    Product

    A team of Stanford engineers have developed a low-cost easy to fabricate membrane electrode assembly (MEA) that is nano-patterned to increase electrode reaction surface area in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). These electrolytes are created with nano-sphere lithography techniques that eliminate the need for photo-lithography intensive steps. The resulting MEA has a thin electrolyte layer shaped into 3-D close-packed hexagonal pyramid arrays. This architecture reduces ohmic loss for better performance at operating temperature between 400-500oC.

  • Operation of Anode Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells on Methane and Natural Gas

    Type: 
    Product

    A solid oxide fuel cell design and process has been developed at Northwestern to accommodate direct use of hydrocarbon fuels without chemical reforming. Conditions to foster stable operation below 800°C without coke formation have been demonstrated. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) continue to promise clean power generation. Utilization of hydrogen and reformed hydrocarbon feed stocks for fuel cells are both well established. Direct fuel cell oxidation of hydrocarbons such as methane and natural gas afford the potential for significant construction and operational efficiencies and economy.

  • Fuel Cell Comprising Solid Oxide Electrolyte Membrane

    Type: 
    Product
    Technology:

    Stanford researchers have patented a new method for preparing an improved solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and its membrane electrode assembly using a proton conducting solid perovskite electrolyte containing nano and micro grains of yttrium-doped barium zirconate. This method of preparing a fuel cell improves the ion conductivity of an electrolyte membrane at a low temperature and a membrane electrode assembly of a solid oxide fuel cell prepared by the method can improve ion conductivity at a low temperature.

  • A novel catalyst with high activity and poisoning tolerance

    Type: 
    Product

    Stanford researchers have patented a low-cost highly active catalyst that is stable over time and in different chemical environments. This catalyst has a number of advantages over platinum the current favored catalyst used in fuel cells. The cost of the materials is roughly 1/10000 the cost of platinum meaning this catalyst could dramatically reduce the cost of fuel cells (currently the material cost of the platinum catalyst may be up to 25% of the entire system cost).

  • Thin-Film Solid Oxide Electrolyte Membrane in Fuel Cells

    Type: 
    Product

    This patented thin film solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology takes advantage NEMS/MEMS fabrication methods and nano-scaling effects to create a high efficiency electrolyte membrane. The fuel cell is designed with an architecture (either an array of nano-sized tubes or a patterned multilayer film) that provides structural strength to the membrane while reducing ionic conduction loss enhancing ionic conductivity and lowering electrical loss. In turn these features lower the operating temperature of the system and increase the reaction surface area.

  • Recycle Gas Cooled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Rgc-Soft).

    Type: 
    Product

    There are various types of fuel cells each classified according to the type of electrolyte used in the cell. IN the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) the electrolyte consists of a solid nonporous metal oxide. A major advantage of the SOFC over other types of fuel cells is its high exhaust temperature. Current SOFC’s operate near 1000° C with recent developments moving that figure towards 700° C.

  • Water-based cathode inks for improved solid oxide fuel cells

    Type: 
    Product

    Solid oxide fuels cells (SOFCs) potentially offer an efficient fuel flexible low emission and relatively low cost means of producing electricity. One of the most popular methods for producing the cathode of the current generation of fuel cells involves the use of organic solvent based inks. Inks used in the manufacture of solid oxide fuel cells have some problems in use. They can be volatile so have a short usage life due to evaporation; many of the solvents used also pose a risk to workers unless handled carefully.

  • Methods for fabricating nanostructured solid oxide fuel cell components and the device

    Type: 
    Product

    Abstract of US Patent 7090891 - Method for fabricating nanostructured solid oxide fuel cells and cell components: A method of fabricating a nanostructured solid oxide fuel cell includes dispersing ceria and doped ceria nanoparticles in a first colloidal solution atomizing the first colloidal solution into a spray depositing the spray onto a substrate to form a thin film electrolyte dispersing a nanocomposite powder including ceria and CuO in the first solution forming a second colloidal solution atomizing the second colloidal solution into a second spray and depositing the second spray over

  • Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Anode With Greater Fuel Flexibility and More Efficient Power Generation

    Type: 
    Product
    Objective:

    The University of Florida is seeking companies interested in commercializing fuel-cell technology with improved range of use. Fuel cells combine oxygen and fuel to chemically generate electricity without combustion. The domestic market for this innovative energy source could grow to $975 million by the year 2012 according to some studies. Of the many existing fuel-cell technologies solid-oxide fuel cells have the distinct advantage of being able to use fuels other than hydrogen allowing for greater flexibility.