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The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

  • Publication date

    Few challenges facing the global community today match the scale of malnutrition, a condition that directly affects 1 in 3 people. Malnutrition manifests itself in many different ways: as poor child growth and development; as individuals who are skin and bone or prone to infection; as those who are carrying too much weight or whose blood contains too much sugar, salt, fat, or cholesterol; or those who are deficient in important vitamins or minerals.

  • Publication date

    AS DISCUSSED IN CHAPTER 1, SETTING TARGETS IS ONE MANIFESTATION OF POLITICAL COMMITMENT. COUNTRIES HAVE ALREADY MADE A SERIES OF COMMITMENTS TO ATTAIN global nutrition targets by 2025 (Panel 2.1). For maternal, infant, and young child nutrition, the 2012 World Health Assembly (WHA) set six targets for 2025. The Global Nutrition Report tracks five of these.1 The WHA also agreed on nine noncommunicable disease (NCD) targets, one of which—“Halt the rise in diabetes and obesity”—is tracked in this report via three indicators.

  • Type of National plan
    Country
    North Macedonia

    To reduce the CO2 emissions from fossil fuels combustion for 30%, that is, for 36% at a higher level of ambition, by 2030 compared to the business as usual (BAU) scenario.

  • Publication date

    The 193 individual country profiles capture the status and progress of all UN Member States, and the 80+ indicators include a wealth of information on child, adolescent and adult anthropometry and nutritional status, in addition to intervention coverage, food supply, economics, and demography. This tool is particularly useful for nutrition champions at the country-level, as it presents a wide range of evidence needed to assess country progress in improving nutrition and nutrition-related outcomes.

  • Publication date

    The objective of the South East Europe and Caucasus Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility Project for Europe and Central Asia is to help increase access of homeowners, farmers, the enterprise sector, and government agencies to financial protection from losses caused by climate change and geological hazards. There are two components to the project, the first component being participation in the Southeast Europe and the Caucasus (SEEC) Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CRIF).