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Enteric fermentation

Enteric fermentation is a digestive process by which carbohydrates are broken down by microorganisms into simple molecules for absorption into the bloodstream of an animal.

Enteric fermentation

  • Viresco Solutions

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Viresco Solutions is a consulting firm based in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Its core business is greenhouse gas offset policy development and implementation, greenhouse gas emissions quantification, sustainable supply chain development, environmental offset methodology development, and providing technical assistance to others undertaking carbon offset project development. Its clients include industry and non-governmental associations, large private sector companies, and local, provincial and federal governments.

  • Fertiliser, manure and straw management (rice)

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Fertiliser and manure management in rice fields are important methane mitigation technologies. The fertiliser management mitigation option includes changes in: fertiliser types; fertiliser nutrient ratios; the rates and timing of applications; and use of nitrification inhibitors to reduce methane emissions by affecting methanogenesis in rice fields. Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture. In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994.

  • Livestock management

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Livestock are important sources of methane. The United States Environmental Protection Agency calculated that livestock, especially ruminants such as cattle and sheep, account for approximately one-third of global anthropogenic emissions of methane (US-EPA, 2006). The methane is produced primarily through the process of enteric fermentation and released through the process of eructation (Crutzen, 1995). In addition, N2O emissions are generated by livestock through secretion of nitrogen through the urine and faeces.

  • Feasibility Assessment: Short-Lived Climate Pollutants Finance Innovation Facility

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This report focuses on investigating the SLCP mitigation technologies offering the highest mitigation potential of the three major SLCPs: black carbon, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and methane, and each of the sectors identified by the CCAC sector initiatives. The report assesses the barriers to expediently mobilise private financial flows towards SLCP mitigating technologies in a number of key sector and markets; analyse the financial profiles of the key technologies.

  • Livestock feed optimisation

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    The principle of nutrition regulation technology to reduce methane emissions is: to optimise the concentrate to forage ratio in diet by controlling the crude fiber content of the diet or the fermentation process to reduce methane emission while ensuring normal production performance of ruminant animals without increasing production cost. This way, the rumen fermentation pattern or rumen microbial populations (such as methanogens, ciliates) and pH characteristics are altered to reduce methane emissions.

  • Rice cultivation

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture (Figure 1). In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994. A variety of technologies are presented on ClimateTechWiki for reducing emissions from rice cultivation.

    Introduction

    The following rice-related mitigation technologies are described:

  • Methane emission mitigation of ruminants

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    To optimise the synthetic or metabolic pathway of micro-organisms related to methane synthesis by employing modern molecular biotechnology to obtain genetically modified microorganisms. Then the genetically modified micro-organisms are introduced back into the rumen ecosystem to establish a relatively stable microbiota that can replace or compete with the original pathway of methanogenesis, to reduce methane synthesis in the rumen.

  • Chemical fertiliser amendment (rice)

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Emissions of GHGs are affected by the amounts and types of fertilisers applied, so judicious choice of fertiliser application rates and fertiliser types can reduce emissions. Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture. In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994.

  • Electron acceptors (rice)

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    Addition of electron acceptors, such as ferrihydrite, to paddy fields can stimulate microbial populations that compete with and slow the activity of methanogens, thereby reducing emissions of methane. Rice cultivation is responsible for 10% of GHG emissions from agriculture. In developing countries, the share of rice in GHG emissions from agriculture is even higher, e.g., it was 16% in 1994.

  • Alternate wetting and drying (rice)

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    The International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines has developed a new mitigation technology for methane known as alternate wetting and drying (AWD) (IRRI, 2009). AWD is a watersaving and methane mitigation technology that lowland (paddy) rice farmers can use to reduce their water consumption in irrigated fields. Rice fields using this technology are alternately flooded and dried. The number of days of drying the soil in AWD can vary according to the type of soil and the cultivar from 1 day to more than 10 days.