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China

China

  • The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Netherlands
    Relation to CTCN:
    Consortium Partner
    Knowledge Partner
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    TNO is an independent research organisation which connects people and knowledge to create innovations that boost the competitive strength of industry and the well-being of society in a sustainable way. This is our mission and it is what drives us, the over 3,400 professionals at TNO, in our work every day. We work in collaboration with partners and focus on nine domains.

  • Screening for Climate Change Adaptation in China: A Process to Assess and Manage the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Development Projects and Programmes in China

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    SignificantÍchangesÍin China"s climate have already occurred over the last 50 years. The ongoing impacts of human-induced climate change are likely to put the efficiency and effectiveness of development investments at risk, and have the potential to reduce growth and human development in China. This document uses case studies focusing on the water sector to test a framework for the screening of projects for climate change impacts and adaptation options. This framework can be refined and adapted according to the needs of different users.

  • Status of Glaciers in the Indus Basin

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    The Hindu Kush Himalayan region encompasses an area of 4.2 million km2 of hills and mountains in the countries of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan. With its vast expanses of snow and ice, the region it is known as the water tower of Asia, which is being significantly affected by climate change. The meltwater from Himalayan snow and ice feeds 10 large river systems of South Asia: the Amu Darya, Brahmaputra, Ganges, Indus, Irrawaddy, Mekong, Salween, Tarim, Yangtze and Yellow Rivers.

  • Energy, climate change and low carbon development in China

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    This policy briefing discusses the dilemma emerging economies like China, India and South Africa are facing in increasing their levels of development. Developing countries have, in the past, not contributed significantly to climate change through greenhouse gas emissions like developed countries. China's development of the past three decades has been unprecedented. Some accuse China of being the highest emitter of carbon dioxide. The Chinese viewpoint is that it is the largest contributor to 'new' emissions from their high use of coal fueled energy.

  • China’s energy transition. Pathways for low carbon development

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    This report describes China's transition to low carbon development in the face of its continuous economic growth and increase in energy demand most of it coal based. The country is now the world's largest carbon dioxide emitter. This has led to concerns about energy supply, local and regional environmental pollution and social stability making China very critical to any global climate change negotiations.

  • China sustainable development strategy report 2009: China’s approach towards a low carbon future. Executive summary.

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    This China sustainable development strategy report 2009, points out that climate change has become the most significant environment and development challenge to human society in the 21st century. It illustrates this with China where, in the last century, land surface temperatures have increased with no noticeable change in precipitation.

  • id21 viewpoint - Questioning climate change: is it really dangerous and fossil fuel induced?

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    Who benefits from disasters and the claims of dangerous, man-made (but still avoidable) global warming? Not that disasters never happen, but do we have the right diagnosis in this case?I
    would like to add a note of optimism to the report by the New Economics
    Foundation (NEF) and the Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS) called
    'The end of development'. Both warn of the reversal of human progress, unless of
    course humanity responds as these 'experts' advise.
    Such claims call for political analysis.
    There

  • Climate adaptation in Asia: knowledge gaps and research issues in China. Final report to IDRC and DFID. The full report of the China team.

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    This is a summary of a report on climate change adaptation research knowledge and capacity gaps in China, commissioned by DFID (UK) and IDRC (Canada) to consider support for a programme of applied research on climate adaptation in Asia. Although scientific research capacity on assessing the effects of climate change in China is strong, adaptation as a specific domain of research effort is a new concept.In accordance with donor priorities, the study involves the identification of vulnerable groups in geographical regions likely to face great stress from climate change.

  • Global Non-Ferrous Scrap Flows 2000-2011

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    The goal of this report is to provide an understanding of global non-ferrous metal scrap flows in the context of non-ferrous industry developments over the 2000 to 2011 period. The focus of this study is on copper and aluminium as the two largest non-ferrous metals in terms of both material tonnages and market value. The report consists of four chapters. The first chapter, presented here, provides a brief backdrop to the analysis on non-ferrous scrap flows. It outlines growth in metal demand and the underlying reasons for this growth.