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Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Official Name:
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Region:

Energy profile

Saint Vincent (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

St. Vincent and the Grenadines have 99% electrification. All islands except St Vincent depend entirely on diesel generation for their electricity supply. St. Vincent Electricity Services Ltd. (VINLEC) operate diesel and small hydro power stations on St Vincent, while the Bequia, Union Island, Canouan and Mayreau islands are reliant on diesel powered systems. Other Grenadines islands are supplied by privately owned electricity systems based on diesel.

Renewable energy potential

The nation has some legacy hydropower capacity, and is working toward better utilizing this resource. Although SVG also has abundant geothermal, wind, and solar potential, very little RE has been exploited. Further, current law discourages both IPP’s and self-generation, and fails to promote solar water heat adoption.HydroelectricityOnly the island of St. Vincent has substantial rivers and rainfall for hydro power, where it has been utilized since the 1950s. While nameplate capacity is 5.6 MW, about 5.2 MW is actually available, and only 2 MW during the dry season.A 2009 feasibility study considered both rehabilitating older hydro plants and developing new sites along existing rivers. Commissioned by VINLEC and funded by CRETAF (a CREDP feasibility study fund), the study found several projects to be technically and economically feasible. The existing Richmond and South Rivers hydro plants could add output of 13% and 10%, respectively, over current production by replacement of electromechanical equipment at a cost of 8.5 million USD.On undeveloped rivers, previous studies by CREDP/GTZ have suggested potential of up to 10 MW on the Wallibou and Buccament rivers. Currently, the National Water Resource Management program is comprehensively assessing water resources for drinking, irrigation, and hydro power. The management program is supported by European Development Fund (EDF) in collaboration with the Central Water and Sewerage Authority and VINLEC. This effort has installed the measurement equipment needed to assess potential new sites.Solar energyWith GHI averaging over 5.8 kWh/m2/day, the low-lying parts of St. Vincent and the Grenadines have good solar resources for flat-panel PV and solar hot water systems.Wind energyThere is considerable wind energy potential on the eastern side of St. Vincent and Bequia and on all of the smaller islands. Wind power has been utilized in the past for grinding of grains. With assistance from CREDP/GTZ, potential wind sites for small farms have been identified. Since September 2005, VINLEC records wind data at a site at Brighton. The measured mean wind speed of the first nine months is above 8 m/s in 10 m height indicating even higher wind speeds in 40 to 50 m, which is the average hub height of a standard wind turbine suitable for SVG. Another wind measurement tower started to operate at Ribishi Point close to the landfill site in March 2007, recording wind speeds and directions at 10m and 30m height.Geothermal energyGeothermal resources have been considered on St. Vincent since a 1996 study by Idaho National Laboratory. Because no exploratory drilling has been done, potential estimates range from about 100 MWe per a 1999 government study to as much as 890 MWe per Huttrer.Biomass energySVG may have viable biomass resources. In the past, the government of SVG has discussed the possibility of cooperating with Guyana in a venture to raise, process, and market jatropha curcas (Barbados nut) as a biofuel. In 2009 GFA Envest GmbH and Caribbean Bio-Energy Technology Ltd. conducted a feasibility study on the use of jatropha curcas, banana trees, and municipal waste, among other sources, for biogas electricity production in SVG. The study concluded that while jatropha curcas are not of sufficient quality for biogas, other feedstocks may be, and there is potential for up to 4 MW from such a plant. 

Energy framework

In 2009, a National Energy Policy was approved by the Cabinet of Ministers of the Government of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. The guiding principles upon which this policy was prepared include strengthening the national economy by reducing the dependence on import of fossil fuels, stabilizing and possibly reducing the energy consumption per capita in the medium and long term, and reducing the dependence on imported energy through continued and expanded exploitation of indigenous resources and improvement of energy efficiency and/or conservation of energy use.SVG approved an Energy Action Plan (EAP) in 2010. The EAP forecasts possible energy scenarios in SVG until 2030. It contains short (1-5 years), medium (5-10 years), and long- (10-20 years) term actions which are designed to implement the policies and goals of the National Energy Policy (NEP). These actions foster to energy conservation, energy efficiency, and diversification of energy source and energy use sectors, including goals such as delivering 30% of projected total electricity output from RES by 2015 and 60% by 2020, and reducing the projected electricity generation by 5% by 2015 and 15% by 2020, among others. The plan identifies sources of international expertise and funding for its projects.In 2009, a National Energy Policy was approved by the Cabinet of Ministers of the Government of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. The guiding principles upon which this policy was prepared include strengthening the national economy by reducing the dependence on import of fossil fuels, stabilizing and possibly reducing the energy consumption per capita in the medium and long term, and reducing the dependence on imported energy through continued and expanded exploitation of indigenous resources and improvement of energy efficiency and/or conservation of energy use.SVG approved an Energy Action Plan (EAP) in 2010. The EAP forecasts possible energy scenarios in SVG until 2030. It contains short (1-5 years), medium (5-10 years), and long- (10-20 years) term actions which are designed to implement the policies and goals of the National Energy Policy (NEP). These actions foster to energy conservation, energy efficiency, and diversification of energy source and energy use sectors, including goals such as delivering 30% of projected total electricity output from RES by 2015 and 60% by 2020, and reducing the projected electricity generation by 5% by 2015 and 15% by 2020, among others. The plan identifies sources of international expertise and funding for its projects.

Source
Static Source:
  • United Nations University – Institute for Water, Environment and Health

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    UNU-INWEH is a member of the United Nations University family of organizations. It is the United Nations Think Tank on Water created by the UNU Governing Council in 1996. The vision of the institute is a world free of water problems where sustainable human development and environmental health and security are assured for all.

  • Sustainable Energy Regulation Network (SERN) Policy Database

    Type: 
    Publication

    This database provides energy information for countries throughout the world, including Africa; the Baltic States, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe; Latin America and the Caribbean; the Middle East; Russia and FSU; South Asia; South East Asia; and the Pacific Region. For each country, the database provides information on energy sources, reliance, electrification expansion, capacity concerns, renewable energy, energy efficiency, ownership, competition, framework, national energy priorities, the role of government, and regulation.

  • Clean Energy Info Portal: reegle (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    This database provides global information on renewable energy, energy efficiency, and climate change, including country energy profiles, a list of key global stakeholders, policy and regulatory overviews, an energy and climate change glossary, a clean energy Web search, geobrowsing features, and a clean energy blog.

  • Policy and Regulatory Overviews (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    reegle's policy and regulatory overviews provide country highlights for a variety of policies and regulations relating to energy, energy efficiency, fuels, standards and labeling, incentives such as feed-in tariffs for renewables, national targets, and other national strategies for low-carbon development.

  • Country Energy Profiles (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    This reegle website provides comprehensive energy profiles for all countries with information from reliable sources such as UN or the World Bank. Profile information includes national policies on energy-related issues, visualized statistics, renewable energy potentials maps, national projects programmes, and key stakeholders.

  • Sustainable Energy Partnership for the Americas (SEPA) Program (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    The primary mission of the Sustainable Energy Partnership for the Americas (SEPA) program is to support the development and use of sustainable energy technologies and services within the General Secretariat of the Organization of American States (OAS) member states. This website lists current projects commissioned by SEPA and provides documents produced through the projects. The website also lists upcoming events and news related to SEPA and explains SEPA's mission, goals, and current activities.

  • Energy Policy and Sector Analysis in the Caribbean: 2010-2011

    Type: 
    Publication
    Energy Policy and Sector Analysis in the Caribbean: 2010-2011
    Publication date:

    This report provides an overview of the energy sector, energy policy, and renewable energy and energy efficiency opportunities in Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The report finds that these islands all have great potential for renewable energy and energy efficiency growth. Geothermal, wind, and solar power are abundant on nearly of the islands studied.

  • IRENA Portal for Studies on Renewable Energy Potential

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Sectors:

    This portal provides access to over 10,000 existing references of studies on renewable resources and potentials available worldwide. The information on this portal is presented using interactive flash maps with color codes that indicate the number of references available by country. Renewable energy resources considered include biomass, geothermal energy, hydropower, marine, solar and wind energy.

  • Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Sectors:

    The Surface Meteorology and Solar Energy website, sponsored by NASA, displays the solar radiation, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, air temperature and humidity for a given location around the globe based on a latitude and longitude.