Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Russian Spanish Yoruba

Tuvalu

Official Name:
Tuvalu
Region:

Energy profile

Tuvalu (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

About 92% of the total households are connected to the diesel electricity grid.

Renewable energy potential

Hydro powerHydropower resources are not available as there are no rivers.Solar energyThe rainy season lasts from November to April, but rain fall is not continuous. Located at 8 degrees south latitude, good solar radiation of more than 5 kWh/m2/day is expected throughout the year. The solar resource has therefore been proven sufficient to power solar home systems reliably. The resource in central Tuvalu is estimated at about 5.5kWh/m2/day with higher values to the north and lower values to the south.Biomass energyBiomass is limited since most of the land is covered by coconut trees that have more economic value as coconut producers than as fuel. Biomass for energy is hampered by the poor soils that make recovery of the resource slow and by the limited land area that generally can be used more profitably for something other than growing fuel. However, there can be a significant amount of biomass made available through replanting of the senile trees if the coconut industry is revived by conversion to biofuel production.BiofuelsThe potential for biofuel is the largest of any renewable energy resource available.  The coconut oil has sufficient capacity to provide a high percentage of the replacement of diesel fuel used for power generation without much rehabilitation. There is significant potential for biogas production from pig manure.Wave energyThere is a moderate wave energy resource in Tuvalu. Although there is a large Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion resource, there are no commercially available OTEC generators, especially at the small size needed by Tuvalu. Regarding tidal energy resources, the island sits on a highly porous coral shelf which does not allow storing significant amounts of water.Wind energyA feasibility study conducted by the e8 members from Japan in 2006 identified wind as potential renewable energy sources to be explored for electricity generation. According to the study, wind measurements showed sufficient wind power only between the months of November and March, and the lack of good wind synopsis points, due to the low lying atolls, poses an additional challenge. Danish-funded Pacific Islands Energy Policy and Strategic Action Planning (PIEPSAP) project funded a wind measuring programme. Wind measurement studies have been carried out in Funafuti for a period of two years and PIGGAREP is to provide financial support for further feasibility studies and assessment of wind power generation potential on the atolls.

Energy framework

The country announced its National Strategy for Sustainable Development (NSSD) 2005-2015 in 2005. In July 2004, the NSSD chose a development strategy by national consensus, including the areas judged to be the development priorities: good governance; economic growth; job creation; more economic opportunity; better health and education; improved basic infrastructure; social development (youth, housing, gender equality, sports and recreation); natural resources (agriculture, fisheries, tourism, environment); and social stability. Each strategic development priority has a vital role to play to attain the “Vision”: To achieve a healthier, more educated, peaceful and prosperous Tuvalu. The Outer Island Development: Priorities and Strategies 2005-2015 within the NSSD includes provide a better infrastructure including renewable energy technologies.Tuvalu National Energy Policy (TNEP), released  in May 2009, targets a time frame of 15 years and focuses on:Energy Sector Planning, Co-ordination, and ManagementPetroleumTransportElectricityRenewable EnergyEnergy Conservation and EfficiencyEnvironmentThe TNEP aims to promote the development of renewable energy resources such as solar, wind and biofuel to broaden energy sources in Tuvalu. More specifically, proposes reviving the solar energy company that ceased operating because of poor management. In addition, the policy calls for energy efficiency measures in all sectors.The policy does not outline detailed plans on how to achieve the goals, nor is there much reference to the role of the private sector. These should become clear as the Ministry of Public Utilities and Industries starts to develop implementation strategies and work plans.Tuvalu government announced its target to have all its energy generated from renewable sources by 2020. It estimates that it will cost about $20m to generate all its electricity by using renewable.The Tuvalu Sustainable Energy Interventions initiative aims to improve public awareness on energy conservation and energy efficiency in the country. It develops capacity of technicians to maintain solar-diesel hybrid systems and solar PV stand-alone home systems in outer islands. The project also adds value to proposed Italian-funded renewable energy project “Tuvalu Photovoltaic Electricity Network Integration" (TPVENI) and enables resource mobilization to sustain programme.Tuvalu activities identified under the Pacific Islands Greenhouse Gas Abatement through Renewable Energy Programme (PIGGAREP) will build on 3 key initiatives: (1) The Tuvalu Grid-connected PV training and installation project, (2) The Alofa Tuvalu's Amatuku Project to implement biogas digesters, a small coconut biodiesel plant, a small windmill and PV systems, and (3) Pacific Islands Cooperation Programme with the Government of Italy and IUCN to install a 40 kW PV system, to feed into the existing diesel grid system, and solar street lights in one of the outer islands - Vaitupu island (Tuvalu Photovoltaic Electricity Network Integration Project - TPVENIP). The project will contribute to reducing the country’s dependence on diesel generation and reduce operational costs to TEC. In addition, it will bring about a savings of about 109 tonnes of CO2 per annum (assuming 30% efficiency). The system was planned to be commissioned in November 2010.The European Community, through the EDF-10 program, is proposing a EUR4.4m project for the Water and Energy sector. One of the three objectives is to increase the use of renewable energy as a proportion of national energy consumption.Tuvalu is part of the GEF Pacific Alliance for Sustainability (GPAS) programme under the “Low Carbon Energy Islands- Accelerating the Use of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technologies” initiative.A Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Unit (REEEU) will be established within TEC with a support of New Zealand. New Zealand also assists with the development of a Master Energy Plan that will likely identify subsequent renewable energy investments and systematic energy sector and investment planning coordinated with the Tuvalu Infrastructure Plan.  The Tuvalu Initial National Communication, released in 1999, documents some of the early identified needs and vulnerabilities of the country. It set the stage for development of Tuvalu’s National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA). Released in 2007, the NAPA provides detailed information about the current and possible future impacts of climate change on this island nation. The need to adapt to the impacts of climate change is also highlighted in the NSSD 2005-2015.

Source
Static Source:
  • Energy, Climate Change and Environment 2016 Insights

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    This publication examines the sectors, technologies and policy measures that will be central in the transition to a low-carbon energy system. It addresses the following questions: (1) What are the roles of coal and gas in meeting the stringent decarbonisation requirements for the power sector consistent with IEA modelling of global climate goals? (2) What are moderate carbon prices accomplishing in the electricity sector, and how can they be helpful as part of a package of other policies?

  • USAID Climate Action Review: 2010-2016

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    This report reviews what USAID and its partners have accomplished over six years. It describes how USAID ‘s climate work has evolved, summarizes its major achievements, and distills lessons learned and shares examples from a portfolio of activities across more than 40 countries and regional USAID missions.

  • Energy Changes Projektentwicklung GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Energy Changes´ (EC) business activities solely focus on GHG mitigation activities applying renewable energies and energy efficiency measures. EC identifies, evaluates and develops renewable energy/ energy efficiency and GHG mitigation projects. EC’s staff includes engineers, scientists, economists and business experts with many years of experience in sustainable energy, resource management and GHG mitigation. EC was founded in 2006 and has currently 15 employees and an annual turnover of approx. 2 million EUR.

  • Le Groupe-conseil baastel

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Founded in 1989, Le Groupe-conseil baastel (BAASTEL) has the mission of contributing to sustainable development. Baastel aims to strengthen the coherence of development issues for a multitude of actors and to improve the effectiveness of development aid in general. Baastel works in sectors that are distinct but complimentary in terms of sustainable development, notably in Environment, Disaster Risk Management (DRM) and Reduction (DRR), and Social Development. In addition, Baastel offers trainings in Result-Based Management (RBM) and language services.

  • The Evidence of Benefits for Poor People of Increased Renewable Electricity Capacity: Literature Review

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    This report provides the results of a review of the evidence that investments in electricity-generating capacity have benefits for poor people, and what factors influence that relationship. The review begins by elucidating a theory to break down the causal chain between additional renewable electricity generation capacity and poverty impacts in four stages or links, which can be formulated as four research questions: (1) What is the link between increased renewable electricity capacity and higher availability and reliability of supply?

  • PacGeo - Pacific Spatial Data Infrastructure

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    PacGeo is an open access geospatial data repository for the Pacific Region providing premier geophysical, geodetic, and marine spatial data sets. Developed through collaboration between the GeoScience Division of Secretariat of the Pacific Community (GSD/SPC), University of Sydney, Geoscience Australia (GA), and GRID-Arendal. The development of PacGeo was combined with targeted training and capacity building activities conducted at the Pacific Maritime Boundary Working Group Meetings, held twice yearly at the University of Sydney and at other ad hoc events in the region.

  • SPC-CPS Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability Section

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Australia
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Pacific Community SPC is the principal scientific  and technical organization  in the Pacific region,  supporting development since 1947. SPC is an international development organization owned and governed by 26 country and territory members. SPC works for the well-being of Pacific people through the effective and innovative application of science and knowledge, guided by a deep understanding of Pacific island contexts and cultures.