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Suriname

Official Name:
Republic of Suriname

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Haydi Berrenstein
Position:
National Coordinator & Advisor for Environmental Policy
Phone:
+597 472 841
Emails:
haydi.berrenstein@president.gov.sr, queenhjb@yahoo.com,
,
Name:
Nataly Plet
Position:
Environmental Policy Officer
Phone:
+597 472 841
Emails:
nataly_plet@yahoo.com

Energy profile

Suriname (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

The Suriname power sector consists of a number of individual power systems. Some of these systems are interconnected while others operate as electrical islands. In the Paramaribo area, electric power is supplied by means of hydroelectric power (a 180 MW power plant that supplies around 75% of the energy) and diesel generators (66 MW of diesel generation).Electrification level in Suriname is estimated at 85%: 79% of the population is connected to the EBS system. In the Hinterlands an estimated total of 111 villages (6% of the population) have a diesel unit installed by the Department for Rural Energy (DEV) of the MNH. About 93 villages are provided with diesel fuel by DEV on a monthly basis. The diesel is provided free of charge, and there is no tariff regime in place. 

Renewable energy potential

Wind energyIn 2002, two wind turbines were installed at Lely Hills for Radio Paakaati. Measurement data shows that wind speed in the inland regions are quite low. Based on these data, wind energy cannot be considered a feasible option for the interior of Suriname. However, the study recommended conducting additional measurements at alternative sites as there may be specific locations with potential.Solar energySome examples of solar electrification have been carried out such as the Kwamala Samatu (project mainly for housing and buildings). In relation to PV systems, there have been different applications in the country. Most of them deliver energy on a small scale, for instance to power up a radio station or a water pumping system. PV technology is in general easy to install and simple to operate and maintain. From a technological point of view, solar energy is an option for the interior because of the good average rate of solar isolation per month.Biomass energyAccording to the 2008 report Suriname Power Assessment and Alternatives for its Modernization, from the four generation options investigated (diesel, biodiesel, hydro and solar), hydropower is the least expensive. However, this is only feasible for villages close to a suitable hydropower site.  Solar only makes sense for villages that are extremely far away. The biodiesel option arises as the most promising one for the future.  Generally, biodiesel is around the same price as traditional diesel, sometimes even cheaper. Besides, electricity access can be improved, while its daily availability can be increased from 4/6 hours to 24 hours/day. In addition to reducing electricity costs, a move to biodiesel production may also enhance economic development in the region.Geothermal energyNo significant geothermal potential exists in the country.HydropowerHydro-electricity counts for a majority of the country's electricity production currently. Suralco operate one of the main hydro-electric dams, selling electricity back into the national grid. Hydro-electric potential is counted as one of the country's main natural resources.

Energy framework

Currently there is no policy for the development of RE in the rural areas of Suriname and no particular policy to stimulate the development of RE technologies in Suriname.The Government’s plans to expand the hydroelectric facilities, which currently cover 75% of Suriname’s electricity  needs, in order to add reliable sources of energy that will allow the control of related costs of production and thus the electricity rates. Currently, there are several renewable generation expansion plans such as the Jai-Tapanahony Diversion (a complex of infrastructural projects whose main purpose is to develop extra hydropower capacity): the Kabalebo Hydro Power Project, and the Grankiki Hydro Project (identified as a possible site for small-scale hydro power development).

Source
Static Source:
  • Okapi Environmental Consulting Incorporated

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Okapi Environmental Consulting Incorporated (OECI) is a private sector organization established in 2011 with the mission to provide quality technical and policy advice on sustainable development. Okapi's work includes project design, management and evaluation, strategic planning, capacity development, resource mobilization, scientific and technical advisory services, technology transfer. Okapi's experience extends in climate-affected sectors such as agriculture, sustainable land and water management, coastal zone management, infrastructure and others.

  • STENUM GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    STENUM has worked for UNIDO, UNEP and IFC in training their Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production Centers and supporting them in the implementation of various activities (education of national experts, consultancy of companies in waster reduction, water minimization, chemicals management and energy efficiency). STENUM has elaborated several manuals and training materials (UNIDO train the trainer toolkit, UNEP PRESME toolkit).

  • Ecofys a Navigant company

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Netherlands
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Ecofys, a Navigant company, is an international energy and climate consultancy focused on sustainable energy for everyone. Founded in 1984, the company is a trusted advisor to governments, corporations, NGOs, and energy providers worldwide. The team delivers powerful results in the energy and climate transition sectors. Working across the entire energy value chain, Ecofys develops innovative solutions and strategies to support its clients in enabling the energy transition and working through the challenges of climate change.

  • SNV Netherlands Development Organization

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Netherlands
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    SNV is a not-for-profit international development organisation founded in the Netherlands 50 years ago. SNV helps people overcome poverty in 38 of the poorest countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America by enabling access to thetools, knowledge and connections they need to increase their incomes and gain access to basic services. SNV works in three key sectors - Agriculture, Renewable Energy and WASH - and in the cross cutting themes of lnclusive Business, REDD+ and Climate Smart Agriculture.

  • Roedl & Partner

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Roedl & Partner is a globally active professional services firm with approximately 4,000 employees and physical presence in 78 countries, including developing countries. One focus area of Roedl & Partner is public Management Consulting, which covers the energy sector. Roedl & Partner's interdisciplinary Renewable Energy team offers comprehensive business, legal, regulatory, and management consulting services to renewable energy sector clients worldwide. Roedl & Partner manages the Geothermal Risk Mitigation Fund (East Africa).

  • Integra Government Services International LLC

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Integra designs, implements, and evaluates international development activities, with a focus on creating opportunities for the poor, expanding access to public infrastructure, promoting social and ecological resilience and strengthening donor programs. Integra has a proven record of innovative approaches yielding lasting results. Integra is a partner of NASA in deploying state-of-the-art Earth Observation technology for REDD+ MRV, while working to build on-the-ground socio-ecological resilience. 

     

  • HEAT - Habitat, Energy Application & Technology

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    HEAT is a independent consulting company focussed on the development and implementation of projects for climate and ozone protection. HEAT has a focus on technology cooperation, policy advice for climate protection technologies, particular in the areas of energy efficiency, cooling and refrigeration, F-gases, inventories, roadmaps, carrying out technical and economic feasibility studies and capacity building measures such as training and certification. HEAT is also the Coordination Office of the NDE Germany.

  • World Coal Association

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    United Kingdom
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    World Coal Association is the global industry association formed of major international coal producers and stakeholders. The WCA works to demonstrate and gain acceptance for the role coal plays in achieving a sustainable and lower carbon energy future. World coal organization's regular policy analysis, workshops, media updates and strategic research provide access to  the highest level of information on the global coal industry and its role in energy, climate and sustainable development issues. 

     

  • Urban Poor, Video narrated by Angélique Kidjo, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    Although urban centers are often ill-prepared to meet the basic needs of rapidly expanding populations, the urban poor are incredibly resourceful people, with their own networks and the proven capacity to save and invest in the betterment of their communities. Climate change can stimulate action that improves and transforms the most vulnerable urban communities.