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Panama

Official Name:
Republic of Panama

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Name:
Mr. Emilio Sempris
Position:
Subadministrator General
Phone:
+507 500 0803
Emails:
esempris@miambeinte.gob.pa

Energy profile

Panama (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

There is a great potential for growth in the Panamanian electric power sector.  20% of Panamanians still do not have access to electricity, especially in the rural areas.  Panama is interconnected with the Central American electricity schemes through Costa Rica.Following the sector's privatization, Panama went from being a net importer of electricity to a net exporter. In July 2006, the Sistema de Interconexión Eléctrica Centroamericano – SIEPAC (Central America Electrical Interconnection System) started to be expanded in order to create a wholesale electricity market to bring down the cost of energy and enhance the reliability of the Central American electricity grid.  In early 2007, a project for electricity interconnection between Colombia and Panama was under consideration.

Renewable energy potential

The share of hydropower and non-conventional renewable generation in Panama’s total output has remained at relatively high levels due exclusively to the country’s significant hydropower capacity. Panama does not yet have non-conventional renewable generation in place, due to some structural biases that have favoured fossil generation.Solar energyWith an average horizontal irradiance of 5.0-5.5 kWh/m2/d, Panama has good potential for solar energy uptake. No large-scale operations with the technology have begun yet, although distributed small solar systems are being investigated as a solution to rural electrification.Wind energyPanama has proven, unexploited wind resources. Two companies are currently developing wind fields in Panama, one of which will be used to power the community of Los Pozos, the first 100% renewables-powered settlement in the country.HydropowerThere is a large potential for hydroelectric power in the country, and a law has been proposed to promote mini-hydroelectric projects as a way to reduce oil imports required by thermal plants.  However, Panama’s ability to continue to expand its hydropower capacity may face greater opposition in the future due to:Community opposition to hydropower projects. As elsewhere in the region, large-scale hydropower projects have encountered considerable local opposition.  Particularly, there has been considerable opposition to the concentration of hydropower development occurring in the province of Chiriquí in western Panama. Opponents of the projects include indigenous communities from the region.Competitive pressures. The spot market in Panama prices transactions involving energy based on variable cost or short-run marginal cost, with the value for hydropower dependent on values calculated by the Centro Nacional de DespachoTransmission limitations. Panama’s transmission network is still relatively weak in terms of capacity to deliver power from the western and eastern extremities of the country toward the centre.Failure of tendering processes. During the middle part of the decade (2002–2008), the public tenders issued by the distribution companies for new hydropower generation capacity were not well received. The primary reason for the lack of interest was that the contracts were too short to ensure an adequate return, but other conditions, such as maximum prices, were also not acceptable.Biomass energy/BiofuelsPanama has shown interest in biofuels technologies, particularly as an export for US consumption. In a 2007 meeting, the President declared the country's interest in performing extensive biofuels research.Geothermal energyPanama holds a potential 400 MW of geothermal resource. However, movement to exploit this resource is slow, with private-sector companies in the country being more interested in wind power, and the Government focusing on hydro-electricity.

Energy framework

National Energy Plan 2009–2023The National Energy Plan released by the National Energy Secretariat in 2009 established as a generation plan the installation of an additional 1299.80 MW by 2023 via the following energy sources:706.30 MW from hydropower473.50 MW from thermal power120 MW from wind power.The National Energy Plan also recognized the possibility of a positive contribution from efficient energy use as an energy-planning alternative. It proposed demand-side energy planning to reduce energy requirements without compromising need or neglecting environmental issues. A draft was expected in late 2010, and it would address the need to achieve improvements in efficiency in buildings and appliances as well as promote public education.

Source
Static Source:
  • Sustainable Capital Advisors

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    SCA provides strategy consulting and financial advisory services to public and private sector organizations seeking to implement sustainable infrastructure projects. Our client engagements involve a diversity of technologies located in countries across the world. Our job is to assist clients "sift through the noise" and develop practical and replicable solutions based on the realities of the financial and energy markets. 

  • Ecosoluzioni Snc

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Italy
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Research and consulting on policy & market uptake actions in sustainable energy, clean tech, agriculture, waste mngt. and environment. Since 2000, wide-ranging technical assistance experience in climate change adaptation & mitigation related services, including: tech. assessments, business coaching, feasibility analysis, policy/market analysis, policy planning, M & E, partnership facilitation, finance structuring, agro-energy value chains, natural resources management, technology transfer. 

  • SNV Netherlands Development Organization

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Netherlands
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    SNV is a not-for-profit international development organisation founded in the Netherlands 50 years ago. SNV helps people overcome poverty in 38 of the poorest countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America by enabling access to thetools, knowledge and connections they need to increase their incomes and gain access to basic services. SNV works in three key sectors - Agriculture, Renewable Energy and WASH - and in the cross cutting themes of lnclusive Business, REDD+ and Climate Smart Agriculture.

  • Orizon Consulting LLC

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Orizon’s mission is to enable new markets and empower leaders to transform local economies through the design of enabling policies and the application of breakthrough technologies promoting market based approaches to low carbon emissions, carbon capture, and sustainable livelihoods. Orizon's team of seasoned experts provide technology solutions, capacity building and advice on policy, legal and regulatory frameworks tailored to the needs of regional, national, and local economies. 

  • Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Ireland
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Environmental Research Institute (ERI) is a flagship Institute for Environmental, Marine and Energy research in Ireland. The ERI has over 300 researchers working in interdisciplinary and currently has 45 live research projects focused on climate mitigation, adaptation and understanding. Focus areas include energy modelling, marine renewables, biofuels, energy efficiency, climate adaptation platforms, modelling greenhouse gas fluxes, atmospheric chemistry and carbon liabilities.

  • Urban Poor, Video narrated by Angélique Kidjo, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    Although urban centers are often ill-prepared to meet the basic needs of rapidly expanding populations, the urban poor are incredibly resourceful people, with their own networks and the proven capacity to save and invest in the betterment of their communities. Climate change can stimulate action that improves and transforms the most vulnerable urban communities.

  • Central American carbon finance guide

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:
    Approach:

    Central American states are aware of the implications of the climate change challenge and are attempting to combat it through the use of the abundant renewable resources of the region for energy generation and fossil fuels substitution. At the international level, the markets for greenhouse gas emission reductions and renewable electricity certificates have been fragmented. This picture is changing but a great deal of knowledge is required from the project developers to maximise the carbon benefits for their projects.

  • REDD Realities: How strategies to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation could impact on biodiversity and Indigenous Peoples in developing countries

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    It is crucial for international and national aspects of any forest conservation regime, programme and project to fully involve women, indigenous peoples and small farmers. This publication looks at the strategies of non-governmental and indigenous peoples’ organisations to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mozambique, Panama and Uganda. It also outlines the likely impacts of REDD on these countries. The document also contains links to reports by NGOs in Nepal, Paraguay and Brazil.

  • Contribution of Energy Services to the Millennium Development Goals and to Poverty Alleviation in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    This report covers several areas about energy access, its integration into national planning frameworks within the Latin American and Caribbean regions, energy consumption trends, social and environmental impact of reforms and emerging planning frameworks for energy in development. The report also provides recommendations, guides for general considerations in energy planning and best practices for implementation vis-a-vis the Millennium Development Goals.

  • Leadership for Environment and Development Pakistan

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Pakistan
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    LEAD Pakistan is a premier and an internationally recognized non‐profit organization, working to create and sustain a global network of leaders committed to promote change towards patterns of economic development that are environmentally sustainable and socially equitable. LEAD Pakistan’s mission is to create, strengthen and support networks of people and institutions.