Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Russian Spanish Yoruba

Latvia

Official Name:
Republic of Latvia

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Raimonds Kass
Position:
Head of Division, Climate Finance and Technology Division, Climate Change Department
Phone:
+371 67026538
Emails:
raimonds.kass@varam.gov.lv

Energy profile

Latvia (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

National electrification rate (2000):  98%In 2008, the High Voltage Electricity Network had fourteen 330 kV sub stations; 1,248 km of 330 kV lines; 41.83 km of 110 kV overhead line, 3,428 km of 110 kV cable line and 117 110 kV substations. The electricity grid is managed by a daughter organization of Latvenergo, SC Augstsprieguma tikls.  

Renewable energy potential

RE sources represented 34% of the primary energy share in 2003. In order of importance and relevance to Latvia, the production of RE energy resources is as follows: hydro energy, fuel wood, peat, and wind energy.In the Energy Policy of the Electricity Sector, peat is considered as a renewable energy source; however that is not the official position stated in the Latvian Energy Policy. There is a technical potential for power generation based on renewable resources, especially wood and wind, but there is not an official detailed study available.Wind energyLatvia has very good potential for wind energy development. The total installed wind energy capacity in Latvia in March 2007 was about 27 MW. This figure represents an eight percent increase on the figures for the end of 2005.  At the current development level wind farms cannot compete with hydro power stations and thermal power stations on the cost criteria.  There is great potential for development however, and several projects are reportedly planned, including a 100 MW project currently under preparation. According to the data from the Renewable Energy Program of the country, technical potential for wind energy production has been estimated at around 1,277 GWh, however the practical potential is estimated at 1,000 GWh/year, and represents about 2,000 MW of wind technical/economic potential. A wind atlas was recently produced for the country, identifying several areas with average wind speeds of 6 m/s at 30m. Biomass energyBiomass is the main resource for heat production in Latvia, mostly outside large towns. According to the State Revenue Service's data, biofuels accounted for 0.22 % of the total fuel used for transport in Latvia in 2006. In 2006, 71 % of the biodiesel and 93 % of the bioethanol produced in Latvia was exported to EU Member States. In 2008, wood and wood waste products were used in about 700 boiler houses all around Latvia, 300 of which have capacities of more than 1.5 MW. Biogas installations, including municipal waste recycling, total roughly 7.5 MW. Over half of the wood resources produced in the country are exported to other European member states, which is part of the reason for the slow development of the sector. Timber wastes alone are estimated to have a potential of 700,000 t/a (4,700 TJ). Hydroelectric powerIn the year 2008, hydropower accounted for 88% of the total electricity generating capacity. The total produced hydroelectricity was 4,127 GWh in 2007. Latvia has three major hydropower plants and 150 small-scale local facilities and there is still unused potential for electricity production. Currently, 65 percent of the technical potential of the hydro energy has been exploited. The remaining economically feasible hydroelectric resource potential is estimated at around 3.9 TWh/a.Geothermal energyAt the moment, the low heat prices for district heating, and the limited experience are barriers to the development of geothermal resources in Latvia.   Geothermal energy is becoming more popular in Latvia due to the constant increase in tariffs for heat energy and electricity. A wide offer of heat pumps is presented on the market, predominantly for private use. Total potential for Latvian geothermal energy is evaluated at approximately 175MW. Solar energyThe solar energy resource potential in Latvia is small compared to other European countries due to the geographic location and to the climatic conditions. The average irradiance per year is 2.6 kWh/m2.  

Energy framework

National Energy Program until 2020The Energy Policy for Latvia is formulated in the National Energy Program (adopted in 1997) until 2020. It gives priority to the rational use of energy resources, the development of renewables, energy diversification and the restructuring of the energy sector.Energy Development Conception for 2007-2013 This is a policy-planning document, which was approved on August 1st 2006, and defines Latvia’s state energy policy, objectives and actions for a period of 10 years, as well as indicating the long-term development route.Guidelines for Energy Sector Development 2007-2016These guidelines set a number of implementation benchmarks in the field of energy efficiency, such as energy intensity improvement, increasing cogeneration potential, reduction of energy consumption in different sectors, boiler house energy efficiency improvements, and many others.The Strategy for the Utilization of Renewable Energy Sources 2006-2013This is a medium-term policy-planning document approved in October 2006, which was proposed to define policy measures, aims and strategies regarding the use of renewable energy sources in Latvia.Latvian Sustainable Development Strategy (2002)This strategy defines tasks and objectives for ensuring sustainable development with regard to the increase of energy efficiency and the promotion of renewable energy use, developing biofuel production (biodiesel, bioethanol and biogas), using agricultural feedstock (rape and grain) and animal breeding by-products.Energy Efficiency Action Plan (2000)The Latvian Ministry of Economy prepared the State Energy Efficiency Action Plan in 2000 with the goal to identify a set of measures for promoting energy efficiency which would help reduce the primary energy consumption per unit of GDP by 25% until year 2010.The Regional Baltic Wind Energy Program: was started in 1999 with funding from GEF, UNDP. This is the latest (2003) and most extensive study of the potential of wind energy in Latvia, containing analysis of wind energy use opportunities from the political, economic, legal, meteorological, energy, environmental and regional aspect.The National Program for Production and Use of Bio-fuel in Latvia (2000): The program analyses the possibility to produce bio-fuel from rapeseed oil, as well as generation of biogas from industrial and household waste. Cabinet Regulation Number 503 “Regulations Regarding Electricity Production from Renewable Energy Sources” came into force in July 2007. This regulation ensures a fixed-price feed-in tariff for renewable energy systems, as well as regulating the size and compulsory generation of these systems. The regulation also offered support for biogas plants.Legislative support for these programs comes from the Energy Law 1998, the Law on Electricity Market (2005), which set and described the functioning of the electricity sector with free customer supplier choice, the Biofuel Law 2005, which defines the responsibilities of the government in achieving biofuel targets (5.75% share in transport by 2010). 

Source
Static Source:
  • Investing in Renewable Energy: The Global Environment Facility Experience

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Sectors:

    The Global Environment Facility has supported technologies including solar thermal heating, solar thermal power, off-grid and on-grid solar photovoltaic, wind power, small hydro power, geothermal power, and biomass in projects globally. Brief case studies are provided for implementation of these technologies in various developing countries.

  • Sustainable Energy Regulation Network (SERN) Policy Database

    Type: 
    Publication

    This database provides energy information for countries throughout the world, including Africa; the Baltic States, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe; Latin America and the Caribbean; the Middle East; Russia and FSU; South Asia; South East Asia; and the Pacific Region. For each country, the database provides information on energy sources, reliance, electrification expansion, capacity concerns, renewable energy, energy efficiency, ownership, competition, framework, national energy priorities, the role of government, and regulation.

  • Clean Energy Info Portal: reegle (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    This database provides global information on renewable energy, energy efficiency, and climate change, including country energy profiles, a list of key global stakeholders, policy and regulatory overviews, an energy and climate change glossary, a clean energy Web search, geobrowsing features, and a clean energy blog.

  • Project Outputs Database (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    This web-based database provides detailed project output documents from Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP) projects. The database contains output documents from specific types of energy access, energy efficiency, and renewable energy programmes. These documents can be searched based for certain technologies or particular countries. Output documents are in English, Spanish, Chinese, French, and Portuguese. REEEP projects aim to improve access to clean and reliable energy in developing countries.

  • Policy and Regulatory Overviews (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    reegle's policy and regulatory overviews provide country highlights for a variety of policies and regulations relating to energy, energy efficiency, fuels, standards and labeling, incentives such as feed-in tariffs for renewables, national targets, and other national strategies for low-carbon development.

  • Country Energy Profiles (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    This reegle website provides comprehensive energy profiles for all countries with information from reliable sources such as UN or the World Bank. Profile information includes national policies on energy-related issues, visualized statistics, renewable energy potentials maps, national projects programmes, and key stakeholders.

  • Transport Research Knowledge Centre (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    The Transport Research Knowledge Centre (TRKC) provides an overview of transport research activities at the European and national level.

  • Renewable Energy Sector in the European Union: Its Employment and Export Potential

    Type: 
    Publication
    Renewable Energy Sector in the European Union: Its Employment and Export Potential
    Publication date:
    Sectors:

    This report was prepared for the European Commission (EC) to assess the state of renewable energy developments within the European Union (EU). The report contains an overview of the deployment of EU renewable energy policies and projects as well as an assessment of the socio-economic impacts of their deployment such as employment, manufacturing activity, and exports. Additionally, it reviews the renewable energy developments in EU "candidate countries" (as of 2002).