Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
English Arabic Chinese (Simplified) French Russian Spanish Yoruba

Kenya

Official Name:
Republic of Kenya

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Research and academic institution
Name:
Mr. Kelvin Khisa
Position:
Head, Environment Division
Phone:
+254 20 6003842
Emails:
kelvinnamukhasi@gmail.com kelvin.khisa@kirdi.go.ke

Energy profile

Kenya (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

As of 2010, Kenya had an overall national electrification rate of 23%, with rural energy access to the grid about 5% and urban access at 50%.The Kenyan Government is working to rapidly increase electrification rates in both urban and rural areas. As part of its national Vision 2030—to create a globally competitive and prosperous nation with a high quality of life by 2030— Kenya aims to grow rural electricity access to 20% by 2012 and 40% by 2024.

Renewable energy potential

SolarSolar energy can be used for lighting bulbs, heating houses and water, drying and generating electricity. Kenya location astride the equator gives it a unique opportunity to invest in solar energy as it experiences solar radiations of 4-6kwh/m2/day and around 6 hours of strong sunlight (National energy policy, 2012). To get the amount of energy or the number of solar panels one would need the calculation below can be used: in Kenya where there is 5.6 hours of sun/day a 80W solar panel would produce=450Wh/day  (Kilonzo, 2013):Wind EnergyKenya Aeolus Wind — 60 MW: The Government of Kenya, project financiers, and Aeolus Kenya Ltd. are closing agreements for the funding and construction of the Kinangop Wind Park. Power Africa also supports the implementation of a grid management program to assist Kenya in managing integration of intermittent renewable energy. The installed wind energy capacity to the grid was 5.45 MW as at June, 2012. Exploitation of wind energy resource in Kenya has however been hampered by high capital cost and lack of sufficient wind regime data among other factors.Biomass & biogasGeothermal resources in Kenya have an estimated potential of between 7,000 MWe to 10,000 MWe spread over 14 prospective sites in the Rift Valley.HydroSmall hydro potential is estimated at 3,000 MW of which it is estimated that less than 30 MW have been exploited and only 15.3 MW supply the national grid.www.ieakenya.or.ke/.../doc.../284-energy-in-kenyaGeothermalKenya’s Draft Energy Policy 2012 estimates geothermal potential within the Great Rift Valley at between 7,000 MW and 10,000 MW. The GDC, a state-owned Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) established for the development of geothermal resources in Kenya, recently invited bids for the development of 90 MW of geothermal power in the Menengai field within the Rift Valley by 2014. In addition to supporting the GDC, the GoK is also expected to create a Directorate to oversee renewable energy policy and a Renewable Energy Lead Agency to undertake the promotion of this resource, with a target 5,000 MW of geothermal power expected by 2030.

Energy framework

The Energy Policy and Act: Kenya’s energy policy of 2004 encourages implementation of indigenous renewable energy sources to enhance the country’s electricity supply capacity. The policy is implemented through the Energy Act of 2006, which provides for mitigation of climate change, through energy efficiency and promotion of renewable energy. In addition, the Feed in Tariffs (FiTs) policy of 2008 (revised 2012) promotes generation of electricity from renewable sources. It applies to geothermal, wind, small hydro, solar and biomass.Kenya’s Updated Least Cost Power Development Plan 2011-2030 (LCPDP).  The government of Kenya (GoK) identifies nine projects as key pillars to the successful implementation of Vision 2030. These are expected to push the country’s energy requirements by about 890 MW, with highest demand expected from the Konza City ICT Park (440 MW) and Meru’s iron and steel smelting industry (315 MW).  The LCPDP is the Ministry of Energy (MoE’s) power implementation plan for delivering the power sector targets outlined in Vision 2030.Under the LCPDP, Kenya’s generation capacity is projected to increase to 19,220 MW by 2030, with geothermal contributing a quarter of  Kenya’s total installed capacity and hydro power dropping ten-fold to about 5 percent. The plan also highlights nuclear power as a potential power source, with an inaugural 1,000 MW plant planned for 2022. Commissioning of subsequent nuclear plants is expected to increase nuclear power generation to 3,000 MW by 2030.KPLC’s Updated Retail Tariff Application on 7 February 2013 (the Tariff Application) also identifies an additional 851 MW of generation capacity expected to be developed by independent power producers (IPPs) (private companies which generate and sell electricity). IPPs account for about 26% of the Kenya’s installed capacity thereby bridging the demand gap.

Source
Static Source:
  • United Nations University – Institute for Water, Environment and Health

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    UNU-INWEH is a member of the United Nations University family of organizations. It is the United Nations Think Tank on Water created by the UNU Governing Council in 1996. The vision of the institute is a world free of water problems where sustainable human development and environmental health and security are assured for all.

  • ECO Consult Sepp & Busacker Partnerschaft

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    ECO Consult Sepp & Busacker Partnerschaft was founded in the year of the UN Rio Summit in 1992. ECO, offers integrated advisory services for developing countries and countries in transition. ECO is among Germany’s leading international consultants to offer independent technical advise for sustainable development in the environment and social sectors, particularly in the fields of REDD+ and wood energy, along the value-chain from the production to the end-users, including innovative stove and carbonization technologies.

  • Policy and Regulatory Overviews (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    reegle's policy and regulatory overviews provide country highlights for a variety of policies and regulations relating to energy, energy efficiency, fuels, standards and labeling, incentives such as feed-in tariffs for renewables, national targets, and other national strategies for low-carbon development.

  • Country Energy Profiles (Website)

    Type: 
    Publication

    This reegle website provides comprehensive energy profiles for all countries with information from reliable sources such as UN or the World Bank. Profile information includes national policies on energy-related issues, visualized statistics, renewable energy potentials maps, national projects programmes, and key stakeholders.

  • Renewable Energy: Markets and Prospects by Region

    Type: 
    Publication
    Renewable Energy: Markets and Prospects by Region
    Publication date:
    Sectors:

    This information paper complements the International Energy Agency's 2011 report, "Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice" (http://www.iea.org/w/bookshop/add.aspx?id=414), and is intended to provide more detailed information on renewable energy markets, policies, and deployment. The paper provides information about current levels of renewable energy deployment worldwide.

  • Expanding Energy Access in Developing Countries: The Role of Mechanical Power

    Type: 
    Publication
    Expanding Energy Access in Developing Countries: The Role of Mechanical Power
    Publication date:

    This paper discusses mechanical power, the off-grid use of motors and fuels, and its critical role in meeting rural energy needs in developing nations. This paper assesses the best practices and financing options that would enhance the role of mechanical power by making it more efficient and better able to enhance the productivity of rural laborers in developing nations. Deployment programs, grants, and other financial incentives are considered and assessed in a series of case studies.

  • Assessment of Pico Hydro as an Option for Off-Grid Electrification in Kenya

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    This paper discusses off-grid electrification options for low-income households in rural Kenya. Topics addressed include the recent introduction of pico hydro schemes (schemes of fewer than five kilowatts), the details of the implementation of two community schemes, and the costs involved.

  • Policy and Regulatory Framework Conditions for Small Hydro Power in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Type: 
    Publication
    Policy and Regulatory Framework Conditions for Small Hydro Power in Sub-Saharan Africa
    Publication date:

    This discussion paper discusses barriers and potential policies to support small hydropower in Sub-Saharan Africa, including institutional arrangements, tariff structures, service standards, entry requirements, and subsidies and incentives. The paper also evaluates the potential of small hydropower as well as existing projects, laws and regulations, and financing options for select countries.

  • Kenya Scaling-Up Renewable Energy Program: Scoping Mission Report

    Type: 
    Publication
    Kenya Scaling Up Renewable Energy Program Scoping Mission Report
    Publication date:
    Sectors:

    This report examines Kenya's potential to benefit from the Program on Scaling-Up Renewable Energy in Low Income Countries (SREP), operating under the framework of the Climate Investment Funds. The report reviews the renewable energy context in Kenya—one of six pilot countries in SREP—as well as the country's potential in geothermal and wind in particular, and regulatory options. The report includes feedback from institutional stakeholders, the private sector, civil society, and development partners.