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Kenya

Official Name:
Republic of Kenya

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Research and academic institution
Name:
Mr. Kelvin Khisa
Position:
Head, Environment Division
Phone:
+254 20 6003842
Emails:
kelvinnamukhasi@gmail.com kelvin.khisa@kirdi.go.ke

Energy profile

Kenya (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

As of 2010, Kenya had an overall national electrification rate of 23%, with rural energy access to the grid about 5% and urban access at 50%.The Kenyan Government is working to rapidly increase electrification rates in both urban and rural areas. As part of its national Vision 2030—to create a globally competitive and prosperous nation with a high quality of life by 2030— Kenya aims to grow rural electricity access to 20% by 2012 and 40% by 2024.

Renewable energy potential

SolarSolar energy can be used for lighting bulbs, heating houses and water, drying and generating electricity. Kenya location astride the equator gives it a unique opportunity to invest in solar energy as it experiences solar radiations of 4-6kwh/m2/day and around 6 hours of strong sunlight (National energy policy, 2012). To get the amount of energy or the number of solar panels one would need the calculation below can be used: in Kenya where there is 5.6 hours of sun/day a 80W solar panel would produce=450Wh/day  (Kilonzo, 2013):Wind EnergyKenya Aeolus Wind — 60 MW: The Government of Kenya, project financiers, and Aeolus Kenya Ltd. are closing agreements for the funding and construction of the Kinangop Wind Park. Power Africa also supports the implementation of a grid management program to assist Kenya in managing integration of intermittent renewable energy. The installed wind energy capacity to the grid was 5.45 MW as at June, 2012. Exploitation of wind energy resource in Kenya has however been hampered by high capital cost and lack of sufficient wind regime data among other factors.Biomass & biogasGeothermal resources in Kenya have an estimated potential of between 7,000 MWe to 10,000 MWe spread over 14 prospective sites in the Rift Valley.HydroSmall hydro potential is estimated at 3,000 MW of which it is estimated that less than 30 MW have been exploited and only 15.3 MW supply the national grid.www.ieakenya.or.ke/.../doc.../284-energy-in-kenyaGeothermalKenya’s Draft Energy Policy 2012 estimates geothermal potential within the Great Rift Valley at between 7,000 MW and 10,000 MW. The GDC, a state-owned Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) established for the development of geothermal resources in Kenya, recently invited bids for the development of 90 MW of geothermal power in the Menengai field within the Rift Valley by 2014. In addition to supporting the GDC, the GoK is also expected to create a Directorate to oversee renewable energy policy and a Renewable Energy Lead Agency to undertake the promotion of this resource, with a target 5,000 MW of geothermal power expected by 2030.

Energy framework

The Energy Policy and Act: Kenya’s energy policy of 2004 encourages implementation of indigenous renewable energy sources to enhance the country’s electricity supply capacity. The policy is implemented through the Energy Act of 2006, which provides for mitigation of climate change, through energy efficiency and promotion of renewable energy. In addition, the Feed in Tariffs (FiTs) policy of 2008 (revised 2012) promotes generation of electricity from renewable sources. It applies to geothermal, wind, small hydro, solar and biomass.Kenya’s Updated Least Cost Power Development Plan 2011-2030 (LCPDP).  The government of Kenya (GoK) identifies nine projects as key pillars to the successful implementation of Vision 2030. These are expected to push the country’s energy requirements by about 890 MW, with highest demand expected from the Konza City ICT Park (440 MW) and Meru’s iron and steel smelting industry (315 MW).  The LCPDP is the Ministry of Energy (MoE’s) power implementation plan for delivering the power sector targets outlined in Vision 2030.Under the LCPDP, Kenya’s generation capacity is projected to increase to 19,220 MW by 2030, with geothermal contributing a quarter of  Kenya’s total installed capacity and hydro power dropping ten-fold to about 5 percent. The plan also highlights nuclear power as a potential power source, with an inaugural 1,000 MW plant planned for 2022. Commissioning of subsequent nuclear plants is expected to increase nuclear power generation to 3,000 MW by 2030.KPLC’s Updated Retail Tariff Application on 7 February 2013 (the Tariff Application) also identifies an additional 851 MW of generation capacity expected to be developed by independent power producers (IPPs) (private companies which generate and sell electricity). IPPs account for about 26% of the Kenya’s installed capacity thereby bridging the demand gap.

Source
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  • Capacity Building hub for Sustainable Energy

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    The capacity building hub collaborates with global stakeholders and institutions across the energy value chain, and leverages their mutual strengths to foster attainment of the ambitious goals. The hub undertakes a demand-driven approach to catalyze change. It is a special-purpose vehicle that facilitates - awareness generation/sensitization, knowledge assimilation and dissemination, design and delivery of programmes of change, and identification of research gaps.

  • Lighting a Billion Lives

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    Lighting a Billion Lives is a global initiative to facilitate clean energy access and the delivery of last mile energy services for basic and productive use. The initiative enables energy poor communities to transition from traditional and inefficient energy sources to modern, more efficient and sustainable energy solutions. The initiative accelerates market development for clean energy technologies through knowledge sharing, capacity building and market seeding.

  • GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment) is a rating tool that helps people assesses the performance of their building against certain nationally acceptable benchmarks. It evaluates the environmental performance of a building holistically over its entire life cycle, thereby providing a definitive standard for what constitutes a ‘green building’. The rating system, based on accepted energy and environmental principles, seeks to strike a balance between the established practices and emerging concepts, both national and international.

  • Specialized Library on Climate Change

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    The Specialized Library on Climate Change houses wide array of resources on climate change related issues, both in print and electronic form. The website provides information about all the resources and services offered by the library. The library catalogue of print and electronic resources and database of literature abstracts can be accessed on-line. Current awareness services like listing of new arrivals and compilation of latest news and events are also provided on-line.

  • ENVIS Centre on Renewable Energy and Environment

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    Publication
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    Objective:
    Sectors:

    The major objectives of the ENVIS Centre are collection and dissemination of information in order to support and promote research, development and innovation among researcher, policy makers, academics and other stakeholders. The Centre is actively engaged in data gaps identification and bridging, resource generation and data collection, capacity-building and information dissemination activities.

  • Good Practice Study on GHG-Inventories for the Waste Sector in Non-Annex l Countries

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    The study aims to provide comprehensive guidance to policy makers and practitioners in developing countries [Non-Annex I countries to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)] for the preparation of national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories for the waste sector. Though GHG emissions from the waste sector are still comparatively low compared to other sectors, they are continuously rising in developing countries due to changing production and consumption patterns. Experience shows that emissions from this sector can be reduced significantly at relatively low costs.

  • Broschüre “Cool bleiben: Das Spannungsfeld zwischen Wachstum, Kühlung und Klimawandel“

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    1. Steigender Energiebedarf und ein Recht auf Kühlung? Darf es ihn geben, den Anspruch auf eine Klimaanlage und einen Kühlschrank – ähnlich wie das Recht auf eine Heizung? 2. Kühle Kette für eine gesunde Versorgung Nach Schätzungen der Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) verderben durchschnittlich 30 Prozent, in tropischen Ländern sogar 50 Prozent der Lebensmittel mangels angemessener Lagerung. 3. Grüne Technik und Wertschöpfung Das Zauberwort heißt Ressourceneffizienz. Der Schlüssel in der Kältetechnik dafür sind natürliche Gase. 4.

  • Buenas Practicas de refrigeración

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    This manual should provide professional guidance on how to service and maintain refrigeration systems operating with new technology, e.g. ozone- and climate-friendly alternative refrigerants to CFCs and HCFCs. It addresses essential know-how on containment of HFC refrigerants which have a high global warming potential (GWP) and provides information on the safe use of environmental-friendly natural refrigerants, such as CO2, ammonia or hydrocarbons.

  • Cool und nachhaltig: Kühlung in der internationalen Zusammenarbeit

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    Kühlschrank und Klimaanlage – sie stehen ganz oben auf der Wunschliste von Menschen in heißen Ländern. Bis zum Jahr 2030 rechnet die Internationale Energieagentur (IEA) mit einem viermal höheren Energiebedarf für Klimatisierung in den Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern im Vergleich zu heute. Auch werden oft chemisch hergestellte Gase als Kühlmittel eingesetzt. Sie schädigen die Ozonschicht und treiben den Klimawandel voran. Grüne Technologien nutzen hingegen natürliche Gase zur Kälteerzeugung, sind energieeffizienter und können mit Sonnen- oder Windkraft betrieben werden.