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Hungary

Official Name:
Hungary

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Kinga Csontos
Position:
Department for Climate Policy
Phone:
+36 1 795 4896, +36 30 455 8568
Emails:
kinga.csontos@itm.gov.hu

Energy profile

Hungary (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

National electrification rate (2000): 99 %

Renewable energy potential

In 2007, the electricity generated from renewable sources increased in comparison with the year before, and almost reached the 1852 GWh maximum output, as in 2005 (before regulation by allowances). The amount of power generated from biomass increased in comparison with the year before.Targets for 2010 were 2,630 GWh (5.8%) in electricity, and in all renewable energy carriers 93 PJ (8.2%).Targets for 2013 for electricity from renewables are 5,400 GWh (11.4%), in all renewable energy carriers 168PJ (14%).Biomass energyThe biggest renewable energy sector is biomass, thanks to geographical and other natural conditions that make Hungarian land very favourable for agricultural use. Total primary biomass production is 54 million tons. At this time only a small proportion of the potential is used.Wind energyProspects for wind energy in Hungary are good, however, with close geographic ties to the largest Austrian wind farm, as well as implied hub-height wind-speed of 6.7 m/s at the currently-installed wind farm near Budapest.Electricity generated from wind energy was 331 GWh in 2009, accounting for 12.4% within the renewable energy mix. Geothermal energy-Hungary has the most significant reserve of geothermal resources among the Eastern European countries.-The current utilisation is mainly thermal water (835 thermal well in operation with an output of 100 million m3), for agricultural use and for district heating.Hydroelectric powerWhile the country is crossed by many rivers, it is a relatively flat country with moderate hydro resources.  The existing total installed capacity was 46 MW in 2008.There are 31 hydro power generators in Hungary –by far the largest of which are the Kiskore and Tiszalok units on the Tisza River in the eastern part of Hungary, owned by the state through Tiszaviz Hydro Power Plants Ltd., with capacities of 28 MW and 11 MW respectively.The country’s technical hydro power potential is around 8,000 GWh, as the second river in Europe, The River Danube, bears a great deal of this potential (72%).Solar energy-Solar applications are not widespread. Solar energy investments are mainly targeted to solar collectors for water and space heating.-The estimation for the next 10 years is 35 MWh conventional energy saving per year - from the projected installation of 100,000 m2 solar collectors - with an average 350 kWh/m2 annual energy output.  

Energy framework

In 2008, the government approved the Renewable Energy Strategy for 2007-2020. The policy targets the increase of RES production to 15% by 2020. The strategy will favour decentralized energy production, the cogeneration of heat and power and the establishment of small power stations utilizing renewable sources locally. The strategy forecasts a substantial amount of new investments by 2020, in the field of biomass, wind, solar and geothermal energy.  Electricity generation from RES will grow faster than heat generation.The Operational Program for Environment and Energy associating with the New Hungary Development Program for the period 2007 to 2013 and approved also by the European Commission indicates a close relationship between energy saving, energy efficiency enhancing, and environmental protection.Renewable Energy Action Plan (REAP)After a long stakeholder consultation process, the Hungarian Government approved the Hungarian Renewable Energy Consumption Action Plan in December 2010 and has submitted it to the European Commission.The approved 2009/28/EC directive on RE sets binding targets on the share of RE in gross final energy consumption. In the EU the target is 20% by 2020 and Hungary has to reach 13%. However the Government set an even more ambitious target to reach 14.65% (120.56PJ).In addition to promoting the realisation of energy and climate change policy objectives, the measures specified in the Action Plan serve the Hungarian economic development, improvements in its competitiveness, job creation and sustainable rural development. This is done by boosting the green economy and also by applying and spreading the use of renewable energy sources, which consequently may become a breakthrough point for the Hungarian economy.The document states that the key areas of Hungary’s renewable energy policy are the following:security of supplyenvironmental sustainability, climate protectionagriculture and rural developmentgreen economy developmentcontribution to EU targets.The National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP)The energy efficiency plan, as part of the Hungarian National Energy Policy, is in favour of supporting energy efficient and environmentally-friendly buildings, equipments, technologies and modes of transport for the public, policy makers as well as for market actors.The aim of the action plan is to set targets on efficient energy use in Hungary for the 2008-2016 period. It determines the detailed national targets regarding reduction of final energy consumption by 1% per year (Directive 2006/32/EC of the European Parliament and the European Council), and - according to calculations - reduction of 57.4 PJ/year (15970 GWh/year) by 2016, in those sectors and industries which are not covered by the EU emission trading scheme.These actions are in line with the national objectives of climate protection. In Feb 2008 the first version of the Action Plan was adopted by Parliament 2019/2008 (II.23) Gov. Decree. Since then the Action Plan has been revised and the modified National Energy Efficiency Action Plan was approved by 1076/2010. (III. 31.) Gov. Decree. 

Source
Static Source:
  • Technology Without Borders: Case Studies of Successful Technology Transfer

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    This report presents case studies of successful transfer of climate-friendly technology -- which are those technologies, practices, and techniques that assist countries in reducing greenhouse gas emissions or assist in adapting to climate change. The report explores the causes for success and draws the lessons learned through a series of diverse case studies that focus on different technologies, regions, and stakeholders.

  • Investing in Energy Efficiency: The Global Environment Facility (GEF) Experience

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    This short report overviews the Global Environment Facility's involvement in funding energy efficiency projects globally. Detailed case studies and impacts are provided for the following projects: greenhouse gas mitigation in Bulgaria, refrigerator labelling schemes in Tunisia, energy conservation programs in China, energy efficiency co-financing program in Hungary, and high-efficiency lighting in Mexico.

  • Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technologies: Case Studies from Global Environment Facility Climate Change Portfolio

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    Transfer of environmentally sound technologies (EST) play a crucial role in the global response to climate change. This report includes case studies on concentrated solar power in Egypt, energy efficient brick making kilns in Bangladesh, wind power deployment in Mexico, fuel cell buses in China, and energy efficiency financing in Hungary. The case studies provide a project description, technology description, as well as results and outcomes. The common features of successful transfers are identified to inform future projects.

  • Putting Carbon Back Into the Ground

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    This report analyses the role that carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology could play in abating increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) while having minimal impact on the global energy infrastructure and the economy. The report examines the potential environmental and economic costs of CCS technology.

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    This database provides energy information for countries throughout the world, including Africa; the Baltic States, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe; Latin America and the Caribbean; the Middle East; Russia and FSU; South Asia; South East Asia; and the Pacific Region. For each country, the database provides information on energy sources, reliance, electrification expansion, capacity concerns, renewable energy, energy efficiency, ownership, competition, framework, national energy priorities, the role of government, and regulation.

  • Clean Energy Info Portal: reegle (Website)

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    This database provides global information on renewable energy, energy efficiency, and climate change, including country energy profiles, a list of key global stakeholders, policy and regulatory overviews, an energy and climate change glossary, a clean energy Web search, geobrowsing features, and a clean energy blog.

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    This web-based database provides detailed project output documents from Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP) projects. The database contains output documents from specific types of energy access, energy efficiency, and renewable energy programmes. These documents can be searched based for certain technologies or particular countries. Output documents are in English, Spanish, Chinese, French, and Portuguese. REEEP projects aim to improve access to clean and reliable energy in developing countries.

  • Policy and Regulatory Overviews (Website)

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