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Guyana

Official Name:
Co-operative Republic of Guyana

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Gary Best
Position:
Presidential Advisor on the Environment
Phone:
+592 623 9900, +592 225 7051, +592 225 0582
Emails:
presidentialadvisorenvirongy@gmail.com

Energy profile

Guyana (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Electricity coverage in Guyana is 81%, whereby there is electricity coverage for over 90% in the coastal zone, where 90% of the population is concentrated. The sustainable electrification of the hinterland to supply approximately 70,000 Amerindian residents in 170 communities in four regions remains a challenge. Few Amerindian communities have diesel power electricity generation and others have recently received electricity from solar PV technologies. Under the Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) the Government of Guyana expects to expand the hinterland electrification of rural communities using solar-PV systems..

Renewable energy potential

Solar energyGuyana is located near the equator and receives a daily average radiation of about 5 kWh/m2/d on horizontal surfaces. As such, for many years, solar energy has been used for several purposes such as drying agricultural produce and for electricity production. In several hinterland communities, solar energy is used for water pumping, 2-way radio transmission and telecommunication and electricity.HydropowerSeveral sites have potential for hydro-power development. Most of them were studied during the 70’s and 80’s by Monenco, Sweco and others. Monenco’s study identified 67 potential sites with a total output capacity of 7,000 MW, and an estimated capacity at sites ranging from a few kilowatts to over 2,000 MW.Wind energyWind energy has been used along the coastline for battery charging, and in the hinterland areas for water pumping.  However, many of the wind chargers fell into disuse as diesel produced electricity became more reliable, whilst wind pumps fell into a state of disrepair due to a lack of replacement parts and expertise to maintain the equipment. Long term wind flow measurements are required to assess the technical feasibility of large wind farms. Biomass energy/BiofuelsGuyana has significant experience in using biomass and biofuels in electricity generation. Today, there is large scale electricity generation at each sugar estate from burning bagasse and raising steam which is fed to turbines. Sugar cane bagasse or rice husk stand as potential options for additional power generation. Both residues can be used as alternative low carbon technologies and could be used to replace back-up thermal capacity of future Hydro projects. The first experience in co-generation in Guyana was Guysuco’s Skeldon Cogeneration Project (8.0 MW available). Geothermal energyWhilst Guyana is involved in exploiting the Nevisean geothermal reserve, no attempts are currently being made to assess or utilise indigenous geothermal resources.

Energy framework

Energy experiences of the recent past, high oil prices and its potential unavailability, have heightened the need for energy security in Guyana. Another pressing factor has been the provision of basic electricity services to isolated and distant communities. Guyana has responded by implementing a number of measures and projects to address these concerns. Based on the energy policy of Guyana, the national goals from 2004 are:To provide a stable, reliable and economic supply of energyTo reduce dependency on imported fuelsTo promote, where possible, the increased utilization of domestic resourcesTo ensure energy is used in an environmentally sound and sustainable mannerThis led to several projects including, but not limited to:Rural electrificationDiversification of energy supply, with emphasis on local inputsDevelopment of renewable energyEnergy conservation and efficiency.These projects have led to the mitigation of climate change, by reducing energy consumption, while generating energy from cleaner sources.Since the emphasis is on reducing the use of imported fuels, replacing such fuels has led to reductions in harmful emissions. In many cases, there have been less harmful substitutes in the form of wood-waste, rice-husk and bagasse. In other cases, substitution has occurred by way of alternate energies and biofuels such as hydro, solar and biodiesel. Guyana’s responses are well in line with the terms of reference for the Caribbean Renewable Energy Development Programme (CREDP) study presented to the Prime Minister in 2009.The existing policy is dated, with a strong bias towards indigenous resources and a reduced reliance on imported fuels. Since this represents a move away from hard fossil fuels, it does support reduced emissions and, by extension, mitigation against climate change. In 1998, the energy mix projected was: indigenous resources 53.7% and imported petroleum products 46.3%. A 26% reduction in the amount of imported petroleum products was forecasted for 2004. However, as of 2008, the use of imported fuels stood at 70% and indigenous resources at 30%. Given the changes in the energy industry and the governmental strategy over the last few years, it is critical that this policy be now updated.Education is being used as the primary tool to promote energy conservation and more energy-efficient equipment, however, there are no specific targets set for the reduction in consumption. Co-generation is also being implemented in the sugar industry. In recent times, it has been primarily for internal use but additional capacity is being fed to the national grid.The Office of the President has recently launched a Low Carbon Development (LCD) strategy as part of its mitigation effort, which is an example of how Guyana is approaching its energy strategy. This effort is being led by the advisor to the president. This LCD strategy intends to use three components to deliver its objectives:AgricultureForestryAlternate energy 

Source
Static Source:
  • Okapi Environmental Consulting Incorporated

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Okapi Environmental Consulting Incorporated (OECI) is a private sector organization established in 2011 with the mission to provide quality technical and policy advice on sustainable development. Okapi's work includes project design, management and evaluation, strategic planning, capacity development, resource mobilization, scientific and technical advisory services, technology transfer. Okapi's experience extends in climate-affected sectors such as agriculture, sustainable land and water management, coastal zone management, infrastructure and others.

  • STENUM GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    STENUM has worked for UNIDO, UNEP and IFC in training their Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production Centers and supporting them in the implementation of various activities (education of national experts, consultancy of companies in waster reduction, water minimization, chemicals management and energy efficiency). STENUM has elaborated several manuals and training materials (UNIDO train the trainer toolkit, UNEP PRESME toolkit).

  • Ecofys a Navigant company

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Netherlands
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Ecofys, a Navigant company, is an international energy and climate consultancy focused on sustainable energy for everyone. Founded in 1984, the company is a trusted advisor to governments, corporations, NGOs, and energy providers worldwide. The team delivers powerful results in the energy and climate transition sectors. Working across the entire energy value chain, Ecofys develops innovative solutions and strategies to support its clients in enabling the energy transition and working through the challenges of climate change.

  • SNV Netherlands Development Organization

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Netherlands
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    SNV is a not-for-profit international development organisation founded in the Netherlands 50 years ago. SNV helps people overcome poverty in 38 of the poorest countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America by enabling access to thetools, knowledge and connections they need to increase their incomes and gain access to basic services. SNV works in three key sectors - Agriculture, Renewable Energy and WASH - and in the cross cutting themes of lnclusive Business, REDD+ and Climate Smart Agriculture.

  • Roedl & Partner

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Roedl & Partner is a globally active professional services firm with approximately 4,000 employees and physical presence in 78 countries, including developing countries. One focus area of Roedl & Partner is public Management Consulting, which covers the energy sector. Roedl & Partner's interdisciplinary Renewable Energy team offers comprehensive business, legal, regulatory, and management consulting services to renewable energy sector clients worldwide. Roedl & Partner manages the Geothermal Risk Mitigation Fund (East Africa).

  • Integra Government Services International LLC

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Integra designs, implements, and evaluates international development activities, with a focus on creating opportunities for the poor, expanding access to public infrastructure, promoting social and ecological resilience and strengthening donor programs. Integra has a proven record of innovative approaches yielding lasting results. Integra is a partner of NASA in deploying state-of-the-art Earth Observation technology for REDD+ MRV, while working to build on-the-ground socio-ecological resilience. 

     

  • HEAT - Habitat, Energy Application & Technology

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    HEAT is a independent consulting company focussed on the development and implementation of projects for climate and ozone protection. HEAT has a focus on technology cooperation, policy advice for climate protection technologies, particular in the areas of energy efficiency, cooling and refrigeration, F-gases, inventories, roadmaps, carrying out technical and economic feasibility studies and capacity building measures such as training and certification. HEAT is also the Coordination Office of the NDE Germany.

  • World Coal Association

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    United Kingdom
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    World Coal Association is the global industry association formed of major international coal producers and stakeholders. The WCA works to demonstrate and gain acceptance for the role coal plays in achieving a sustainable and lower carbon energy future. World coal organization's regular policy analysis, workshops, media updates and strategic research provide access to  the highest level of information on the global coal industry and its role in energy, climate and sustainable development issues. 

     

  • Urban Poor, Video narrated by Angélique Kidjo, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    Although urban centers are often ill-prepared to meet the basic needs of rapidly expanding populations, the urban poor are incredibly resourceful people, with their own networks and the proven capacity to save and invest in the betterment of their communities. Climate change can stimulate action that improves and transforms the most vulnerable urban communities.

  • Shaping climate resilient development

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    This paper presents an assessment of climate risks from the existing climate as well as from a range of scenarios. It assesses the expected annual loss to economies from existing climate patterns, a projection of the extent to which future economic growth will put greater value at risk, and the incremental loss that could occur over a twenty-year period under a range of climate change scenarios based on the latest scientific knowledge.