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Gambia

Official Name:
Republic of The Gambia

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Specialized agency
Name:
Mr. Lamin Jatta
Position:
Head of Department
Phone:
+220 4392600
Emails:
laminj@ymail.com

Energy profile

Gambia (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Nationwide, as of 2011, the urban electrification rate stood at 60%, with approximately 30% of rural households having electricity access. 93% of the population of Banjul, the capital, had electricity access. The North Bank and Central River regions of the country are currently the least electrified, with 7% and 8% of households respectively having electricity access in those regions.In 2000, a rural electrification project was started, with the construction of six power plants and transmission lines to supply a large number of towns and villages. Also in 2000, a project was approved which consisted of the construction of six power stations (combined capacity of 6.2 MW), and the installation of 141 miles (227 km) of transmission and distribution lines, to supply power to 46 towns and villages. As of 2009, approximately 2.2 MW of this target has been achieved. The total cost of the rural electrification project is estimated at US$19 million, with additional financing coming from international donors. The majority of the electricity grid is 33 kV, with 11 kV distribution feeders.

Renewable energy potential

Solar energyThe Gambia has a substantial solar energy potential of 4.5–5.3 kW/m²/day - one of the most promising RE sources of the country. The country receives approximately 2,500 hours of sunshine yearly. By the end of 2006, PV installations with a capacity of more than 700 kWp were installed. In addition to PV, solar cookers and solar water heating units have also been installed to good effect in the country. A number of systems have been installed for applications such as water pumping, telecommunications, refrigeration, and community lighting under various projects, including the CILSS Regional Solar Programme (RSP) funded by the European Development Fund (EDF). Domestic lighting from PV was also provided for under this project.Wind energyAn ADB-funded Renewable Energy Study in 2004/5 focused primarily on the wind resource in the country. Eight wind measuring stations were constructed, measuring speeds at 30 metres. The available wind speeds across the Gambia are about 3 m/s on average. Presently, about 20 wind power applications are in operation for water pumping purposes. Even though the available wind power potential is modest, the coastal areas offer substantial opportunities. A pilot project is being implemented in Batakunku Village - a 150 kVA generator. The Batakunku windmill is a philanthropic project which will provide electricity for the villagers when there is wind, with any excess being pumped into the transmission network, and power obtained from NAWEC when there is no wind. The project also marked the first fully-implemented IPP involvement in the generation and distribution sectors. The project was implemented in two phases. The initial phase was to connect the village to the grid in July 2008. The second phase involved construction, which started in November 2008. The system was finally commissioned fully in 2009. Biomass energyThe use of fuel wood and residues from wood processing for electricity generation is not encouraged, due to constraints in the utilization of wood for domestic cooking. More than 90% of the population rely on wood to meet their energy needs. The use of other types of biomass is quite low due to the limited availability of agricultural waste and other potential sources. There are some limited activities in the field of biofuels, mainly produced from jatropha. Several projects were initiated by the government in the 1980s to reduce the country’s dependence on fuel wood and charcoal. This included the promotion of improved cooking stoves using firewood or charcoal and groundnut shell briquettes. Recently the Department of State for Petroleum, Energy and Mineral Resources (DoSPEMR) participated in the promotion of biogas through the Peri-Urban Project for Agriculture. Within this, 20 biogas digesters in rural and peri-urban areas were implemented. At least two of these sites are running satisfactorily. In addition, Naanovo Energy Gambia Ltd., a subsidiary of the American Naanovo Energy, has signed a 25-year PPA with NAWEC for a 14 MW waste-to-energy plant in the country. In addition, Electronic Solar, an Italian firm, has expressed interest in a combined waste and miscanthus gas project, totalling 10 MW.  Geothermal energyNo study into the geothermal potential of the Gambia has been conducted. Potential heat reserves in deep aquifers have been mooted as a possible avenue of investigation, but no research is currently being conducted. HydropowerThe feasibility of using hydro-power is being examined within a sub-regional framework. The Gambia in and of itself has no hydropower potential. The country, however, is co-operating with Guinea, Senegal and Guinea-Bissau to construct two large-scale hydropower generation units at Sambagalo (Senegal) and Kaleta (Guinea), under the Gambia River Basin Development Organisation (OMVG).

Energy framework

The National Energy Policy is consistent with objectives outlined in the Vision 2020 and the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP). The long-term aim is to maximise efficient development and utilization of scarce energy resources to support economic development in an environmentally friendly way. The overall objectives are to:improve and expand  energy systems through private sector partnership,promote a domestic fuel sub-sector, focusing on sustainable management of forests,widen  access to modern forms of energy to stimulate development and reduce poverty,provide adequate security of energy supply, andstrengthen institutional and human resource capacity, and enhance research and development (R&D).The National Electricity Policy (2005) further promotes private sector participation in the electricity sector, and also sets out a framework for the licensing of private generation, transmission and distribution operators. In addition, a tariff approval model and set of guidelines were created. According to the National Energy Policy document, the aim of the RE sub-sector is to support sustainable development. The specific objectives are to: (i) promote renewable energy such as solar, wind and biomass, (ii) develop a domestic production capacity from RE fuels and technologies, and (iii) ensure the sustainable supply of RE fuels and technologies at competitive prices through private sector participation. The Policy also encourages the use of alternative fuels and technologies as a substitute for petroleum products by: (i) exploring the prospects of using gas, HFO, modern biomass (including bioenergy, groundnut shell and sawdust briquettes and bagasse) for energy generation, (ii) complementing the government’s fiscal incentives with donor assistance to promote the use of efficient fuels and technologies, (iii) continuing to provide fiscal incentives for fuel supply to the rural electrification project, and (iv) encouraging investment in efficient technologies for energy generation. To promote new and RE technologies, the following strategies are formulated: (i) popularise the use of solar PV, solar thermal and other RE systems, particularly in rural areas, (ii) facilitate local and international donor  provision of grants, interest-free loans, and other fiscal incentives for  renewable energy, including solar PV and thermal, wind and biomass systems, (iii) promote the use of solar water heaters in institutions, hotels and households, (iv) create awareness of the economic and environmental benefits of using RE technologies, (v) promote research and development of RE devices, (vi) encourage the production/assembly of RE devices in the Gambia, (vii) encourage utilization of efficient RE technologies by providing tax-free concessions(viii) encourage and support private sector participation in the development of RE fuels, devices and technologies, at competitive prices.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Tambourine Innovation Ventures Inc.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Incorporated in 2015, Tambourine Innovation Ventures (TIV) is an innovation advisory and venture development firm that provides a full suite of services and solutions to the challenges and needs generated by the increasing interest and activity globally in the areas of climate change adaptation/mitigation, innovation, technology transfer and venture finance. TIV founders and consultants bring more than three decades of experience in assisting the developing countries access innovative technologies from the industrialized countries and grow technology ventures.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.