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Canada

Official Name:
Canada

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Diana Cartwright
Position:
Manager, Energy and Environment Policy Division.
Phone:
+1 343 292 6465
Emails:
canadande-end@canada.ca

Energy profile

Canada (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Canada’s bulk transmission network consists of more than 160,000 kilometres of high voltage lines.Canada has three power grids: the Western grid, the Eastern grid, and the Quebec grid, which includes Atlantic Canada. The border between the Eastern and Western grids is the Alberta-Saskatchewan border. Canadian grids are also tied into the U.S. grids (the Western Interconnection, the Eastern Interconnection and the Texas Interconnection). For example, the electricity grid in Alberta and British Columbia is part of the Western Interconnection in the United States.

Renewable energy potential

Canada is a world leader in the production and use of renewable energy, with renewable energy representing 17% of Canada’s total primary energy supply. In the electricity sector, hydroelectricity is the largest renewable energy source in Canada, accounting for approximately 60% of Canada’s electricity generation. Other non-hydro renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, tidal and solar, contribute to increasing this share by 3% to over 63%. When adding nuclear energy, over 77% of Canada’s electricity generation does not emit greenhouse gases. Canada is the world’s third largest producer of hydroelectricity, and it is positioned ninth globally in terms of wind energy installed capacity. Canada also has one of the largest tidal barrage power plants in the world – the 20 MW Annapolis tidal power plant in Nova Scotia.SolarCanada has plentiful solar energy resources, with the most extensive resources being found in southern Ontario, Quebec and the Prairies. The territories have a smaller potential, and less direct sunlight, because of their higher latitude.With 559 MWp of installed photovoltaics in 2011, Canada ranked 14th among the world's countries. Ontario has a program of moving away from coal and promoting renewable resources which has led to a number of industrial-scale photovoltaic plants being built. Located in Sarnia, Ontario, the 97 MW Sarnia Photovoltaic Power Plant was briefly the largest solar farm in the world (in October 2010) and can power more than 12,000 homes. Other plants include the 23.4 MW Arnprior Solar Generating Station and a 68 MW solar farm is in Sault Ste. Marie.GeothermalThere is very little geothermal electricity generation in Canada at present but there is a potential for generating a substantial amount. The high-temperature sources can be used for generating electricity and the cooler sources can be used for local heating..Wind EnergyWind power has experienced strong growth in recent years. Over the projection period, it makes the largest contribution to non-hydro renewable growth. At the end of 2011, wind power generating capacity in Canada was 5,265 megawatts MW, providing some 2.3% of Canada's electricity demand. Ontario, Quebec and Alberta each had more than 1,000 MW of capacity. All provinces and territories, except Nunavut, had some commercial wind power in 2012.Biomass/ BiogasCanada’s biomass includes an abundance of sustainable, renewable, combustible and/or consumable vegetation and waste material, available Canada-wide. In a relatively energy-inefficient process, Canada is growing crops to produce ethanol as a vehicle fuel to replace oil. Canada has been producing ethanol from corn in Ontario and grain in the western provinces. As well as a fuel for light vehicles, biomass is being used to produce biodiesel and aviation fuel.HydroHydroelectric power is the greatest source of power generation in Quebec, British Columbia, Manitoba and Newfoundland-Labrador. All four provinces have extensive potential hydro power resources aggregating some 30.000 MWe. Some potential hydro power resources exist in northern Ontario and one on the Slave River in Alberta. Canadian-developed, high voltage direct current transmission may make these remote resources viable options.

Energy framework

Negotiations toward a Canadian energy strategy have been taking place through the Council of the Federation, an organization composed of Canada’s provincial and territorial governments.In 2007, Canada’s premiers released A Shared Vision for Energy in Canada, a policy document outlining a series of priorities for interprovincial cooperation on energy. It sets out an action plan to facilitate development of renewable and green energy, promote conservation and efficiency, accelerate research and development, and provide for secure and reliable energy transmission and distribution. Through 2012 and 2013, the premiers have updated and expanded the document, presenting it as the basis for a new Canadian energy strategy.In late April 2013, the premiers of Manitoba, Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador met with media to provide an overview of negotiations. Discussions were grouped around three broad areas, with three provinces taking a lead in each area. Grouped under the three broad categories is a 10-point plan (see Canadian Energy Strategy: 10 Action Areas), with each “action item” represented by a provincial working group.Most of the action items covered in the 10 points have direct or indirect implications for local governments and communities. The emphasis on energy infrastructure and new regulatory processes is of key interest to local governments. Premiers charged with developing a path toward a Canadian energy plan say the next stage is to consult Canadians. Implementation of a national energy strategy will necessarily involve laws, policies, economic instruments and tools that have important local government implications.Energy Efficiency ActThe Energy Efficiency Act, which took effect in 1992 and was amended in 2009 to expand its scope and effectiveness, provides for the creation and enforcement of regulations on the energy efficiency of products, and supports the pursuit of an energy market transformation in Canada through the replacement of the least efficient products with high-efficiency, cost-effective ones.Provincial governments are also major contributors to energy efficiency in their respective provinces through the establishment of energy-efficient building codes, equipment standards, etc.ecoENERGY Programmes Running until 2016, the ecoENERGY Efficiency Program targets energy efficiency improvements in all end-use sectors, making the housing, building and equipment stock more energy-efficient, energy performance more visible, and industry and vehicle operations more efficient.  The OEE also delivers the ecoENERGY for Biofuels, which supports the production of renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel and encourages the development of a competitive domestic industry, and the ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels, which supports the diversification of energy used in the transportation sector through education and outreach activities and codes and standards development for natural gas.

Source
Static Source:
  • Okapi Environmental Consulting Incorporated

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Okapi Environmental Consulting Incorporated (OECI) is a private sector organization established in 2011 with the mission to provide quality technical and policy advice on sustainable development. Okapi's work includes project design, management and evaluation, strategic planning, capacity development, resource mobilization, scientific and technical advisory services, technology transfer. Okapi's experience extends in climate-affected sectors such as agriculture, sustainable land and water management, coastal zone management, infrastructure and others.

  • Sustainable Capital Advisors

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    SCA provides strategy consulting and financial advisory services to public and private sector organizations seeking to implement sustainable infrastructure projects. Our client engagements involve a diversity of technologies located in countries across the world. Our job is to assist clients "sift through the noise" and develop practical and replicable solutions based on the realities of the financial and energy markets. 

  • Ecosoluzioni Snc

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Italy
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Research and consulting on policy & market uptake actions in sustainable energy, clean tech, agriculture, waste mngt. and environment. Since 2000, wide-ranging technical assistance experience in climate change adaptation & mitigation related services, including: tech. assessments, business coaching, feasibility analysis, policy/market analysis, policy planning, M & E, partnership facilitation, finance structuring, agro-energy value chains, natural resources management, technology transfer. 

  • Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Energy Overview 2012

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Sustainable energy development can be achieved by employing highly effective government policies and by broadening energy cooperation between economies through bilateral, regional and multilateral schemes. In this context, sharing information on common energy challenges is essential. The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Energy Overview is an annual publication intended to promote information sharing. It contains energy demand and supply data as well as energy policy information for each of the 21 APEC economies.

  • Urban Poor, Video narrated by Angélique Kidjo, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    Although urban centers are often ill-prepared to meet the basic needs of rapidly expanding populations, the urban poor are incredibly resourceful people, with their own networks and the proven capacity to save and invest in the betterment of their communities. Climate change can stimulate action that improves and transforms the most vulnerable urban communities.

  • Is Climate Change a Gender Issue?

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Many would say that global warming is the most serious environmental issue of the twenty first century. As a result of climate change, women have seen their workload increase in many activities which have traditionally been women's responsibilities. For instance, fishing has been made more difficult by the intrusion of salted water in fresh water systems. Fetching clean water and fuel has also become more difficult.

  • Mitigating droughts and floods in agriculture: policy lessons and approaches

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change is recognised as a factor that will increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events, notably of droughts and floods to which the agriculture sector is especially exposed.

    Agricultural productivity growth and policy development have allowed the sector to better cope with these risks and reduce overall impacts.

  • The Evidence of Benefits for Poor People of Increased Renewable Electricity Capacity: Literature Review

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Lack of access to electricity is seen as a major constraint to economic growth and increased welfare in developing countries. In this report, the authors conducted a review of the evidence that investments in electricity-generating capacity have benefits for poor people, and what factors influence that relationship. The review analyzes a large and diverse range of literature dealing with the poverty impacts of increased generation capacity.

  • Environmental and social safeguards (EoD)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This report reviews existing environmental, social and climate safeguard systems developed and adopted by multilateral and bilateral development agencies. The aim of the report is to assess the potential for the UK Department for International Development (DFID) to adopt or rely on these systems. This will help guide the application of DFID’s new SMART rules, which include a commitment to ensuring sustainability and resilience, and to avoid doing harm such as creating or exacerbating resource scarcity, climate change and/or environmental damage.

  • Climate and Development Knowledge Network

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    The Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) supports decision-makers in designing and delivering climate compatible development, through research, advisory services and knowledge management, in support of locally owned and managed policy processes. The CDKN work in partnership with decision-makers in public, private and non-governmental sectors, nationally, regionally and globally, while strongly holding to the ideals of human development and environmental sustainability.