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Canada

Official Name:
Canada

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Diana Cartwright
Position:
Manager, Energy and Environment Policy Division.
Phone:
+1 343 292 6465
Emails:
canadande-end@canada.ca

Energy profile

Canada (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Canada’s bulk transmission network consists of more than 160,000 kilometres of high voltage lines.Canada has three power grids: the Western grid, the Eastern grid, and the Quebec grid, which includes Atlantic Canada. The border between the Eastern and Western grids is the Alberta-Saskatchewan border. Canadian grids are also tied into the U.S. grids (the Western Interconnection, the Eastern Interconnection and the Texas Interconnection). For example, the electricity grid in Alberta and British Columbia is part of the Western Interconnection in the United States.

Renewable energy potential

Canada is a world leader in the production and use of renewable energy, with renewable energy representing 17% of Canada’s total primary energy supply. In the electricity sector, hydroelectricity is the largest renewable energy source in Canada, accounting for approximately 60% of Canada’s electricity generation. Other non-hydro renewable energy sources, such as biomass, wind, tidal and solar, contribute to increasing this share by 3% to over 63%. When adding nuclear energy, over 77% of Canada’s electricity generation does not emit greenhouse gases. Canada is the world’s third largest producer of hydroelectricity, and it is positioned ninth globally in terms of wind energy installed capacity. Canada also has one of the largest tidal barrage power plants in the world – the 20 MW Annapolis tidal power plant in Nova Scotia.SolarCanada has plentiful solar energy resources, with the most extensive resources being found in southern Ontario, Quebec and the Prairies. The territories have a smaller potential, and less direct sunlight, because of their higher latitude.With 559 MWp of installed photovoltaics in 2011, Canada ranked 14th among the world's countries. Ontario has a program of moving away from coal and promoting renewable resources which has led to a number of industrial-scale photovoltaic plants being built. Located in Sarnia, Ontario, the 97 MW Sarnia Photovoltaic Power Plant was briefly the largest solar farm in the world (in October 2010) and can power more than 12,000 homes. Other plants include the 23.4 MW Arnprior Solar Generating Station and a 68 MW solar farm is in Sault Ste. Marie.GeothermalThere is very little geothermal electricity generation in Canada at present but there is a potential for generating a substantial amount. The high-temperature sources can be used for generating electricity and the cooler sources can be used for local heating..Wind EnergyWind power has experienced strong growth in recent years. Over the projection period, it makes the largest contribution to non-hydro renewable growth. At the end of 2011, wind power generating capacity in Canada was 5,265 megawatts MW, providing some 2.3% of Canada's electricity demand. Ontario, Quebec and Alberta each had more than 1,000 MW of capacity. All provinces and territories, except Nunavut, had some commercial wind power in 2012.Biomass/ BiogasCanada’s biomass includes an abundance of sustainable, renewable, combustible and/or consumable vegetation and waste material, available Canada-wide. In a relatively energy-inefficient process, Canada is growing crops to produce ethanol as a vehicle fuel to replace oil. Canada has been producing ethanol from corn in Ontario and grain in the western provinces. As well as a fuel for light vehicles, biomass is being used to produce biodiesel and aviation fuel.HydroHydroelectric power is the greatest source of power generation in Quebec, British Columbia, Manitoba and Newfoundland-Labrador. All four provinces have extensive potential hydro power resources aggregating some 30.000 MWe. Some potential hydro power resources exist in northern Ontario and one on the Slave River in Alberta. Canadian-developed, high voltage direct current transmission may make these remote resources viable options.

Energy framework

Negotiations toward a Canadian energy strategy have been taking place through the Council of the Federation, an organization composed of Canada’s provincial and territorial governments.In 2007, Canada’s premiers released A Shared Vision for Energy in Canada, a policy document outlining a series of priorities for interprovincial cooperation on energy. It sets out an action plan to facilitate development of renewable and green energy, promote conservation and efficiency, accelerate research and development, and provide for secure and reliable energy transmission and distribution. Through 2012 and 2013, the premiers have updated and expanded the document, presenting it as the basis for a new Canadian energy strategy.In late April 2013, the premiers of Manitoba, Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador met with media to provide an overview of negotiations. Discussions were grouped around three broad areas, with three provinces taking a lead in each area. Grouped under the three broad categories is a 10-point plan (see Canadian Energy Strategy: 10 Action Areas), with each “action item” represented by a provincial working group.Most of the action items covered in the 10 points have direct or indirect implications for local governments and communities. The emphasis on energy infrastructure and new regulatory processes is of key interest to local governments. Premiers charged with developing a path toward a Canadian energy plan say the next stage is to consult Canadians. Implementation of a national energy strategy will necessarily involve laws, policies, economic instruments and tools that have important local government implications.Energy Efficiency ActThe Energy Efficiency Act, which took effect in 1992 and was amended in 2009 to expand its scope and effectiveness, provides for the creation and enforcement of regulations on the energy efficiency of products, and supports the pursuit of an energy market transformation in Canada through the replacement of the least efficient products with high-efficiency, cost-effective ones.Provincial governments are also major contributors to energy efficiency in their respective provinces through the establishment of energy-efficient building codes, equipment standards, etc.ecoENERGY Programmes Running until 2016, the ecoENERGY Efficiency Program targets energy efficiency improvements in all end-use sectors, making the housing, building and equipment stock more energy-efficient, energy performance more visible, and industry and vehicle operations more efficient.  The OEE also delivers the ecoENERGY for Biofuels, which supports the production of renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel and encourages the development of a competitive domestic industry, and the ecoENERGY for Alternative Fuels, which supports the diversification of energy used in the transportation sector through education and outreach activities and codes and standards development for natural gas.

Source
Static Source:
  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • HabitatSeven Inc.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    HabitatSeven is a design and technology development agency specializing in producing digital communication tools, websites and data driven applications for climate science and climate policy based organizations. Their team combines graduate level experts in the area of climate change with top designers and developers. HabitatSeven has built award winning, open-source delivery mechanisms, visualization engines and data services specifically focused on delivering climate data.          

  • Tambourine Innovation Ventures Inc.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Incorporated in 2015, Tambourine Innovation Ventures (TIV) is an innovation advisory and venture development firm that provides a full suite of services and solutions to the challenges and needs generated by the increasing interest and activity globally in the areas of climate change adaptation/mitigation, innovation, technology transfer and venture finance. TIV founders and consultants bring more than three decades of experience in assisting the developing countries access innovative technologies from the industrialized countries and grow technology ventures.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • ClearPath

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    ClearPath is a cloud based-tool for energy and emission management. It can forecast multiple scenarios for future emissions, analyse the costs and benefits of emissions reduction measures, visualize alternative planning scenarios etc.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.

  • Local Energy Efficiency Policy Calculator (LEEP-C)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    The tool provides the opportunity to analyse the impacts of 23 different policy types from 4 energy-using sectors:

    1. public buildings,
    2. commercial buildings,
    3. residential buildings, and
    4. transportation.

    Impacts of policy choices are analysed in terms of energy savings, cost savings, pollution reduction, and other outcomes over a time period set by the user. The tool also allows for assigning the weights to different policy options based on community priorities in order to tailor policy development process to community goals.

  • Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Switzerland
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    The Institut International de l'Écologie Industrielle et de l'Économie Verte is an establishment of reflection, research and practice of industrial ecology. The Institute has an engineering division and an expertise cluster, which enables the Institute to identify new technologies linked to industrial ecology and to advise through a specific methodology adapted to local contexts. The project managers work on the practical execution of mandates and on the implementation of the industrial ecology with a particular attention to Switzerland and developing countries.