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Bahamas

Official Name:
Commonwealth of the Bahamas
Region:

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Rhianna Neely
Position:
Environment Officer
Phone:
+12423226005
Emails:
rneelybest@gmail.com

Energy profile

Bahamas (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

The Bahamas is unique in that its electricity system is distributed among some 16 isolated island grids. Thus expansion is incremental, and generation capacity is primarily small diesel plants with a capacity of 20MW and less. In spite of the distributed layout of the system, BEC charges a single rate structure for its customers. The Bahamas has nearly complete electrification at about 99% overall and 100% for Grand Bahama.The majority of the electricity infrastructure is concentrated on New Providence, which holds roughly two-thirds of the nation's population. 

Renewable energy potential

RE resources have yet to be exploited in the Bahamas in any significant way. Solar energyThe Bahamian government implemented incentives for solar equipment in 2008, by decreasing import duties from 42% to 10%. The hospitality industry has shown some interest in solar devices, and several PV and SWH distributors have entered the market. The Bahamas have good solar resources for flat-panel PV and solar hot water systems with GHI averaging over 5.3 kWh/m2/day. While this is somewhat less than other islands in the Caribbean, the high price of power means PV and SHW systems are still economically viable. The direct normal irradiation (DNI) resource is far poorer, suggesting that concentrated solar would perform poorly in this region.Wind energyWind data is being measured on Grand Bahama Island in a joint project between GBP and shareholder Emera. The assessment project involves towers at seven sites across the island, at a cost of USD 263,600. Following the assessment, GBP may install up to 15 MW of wind capacity by 2012.Biomass energyWaste-to-energy currently represents the more immediate initiative to increase power supplies in the short term, while at the same time improving air quality, reducing pollution and illegal burning of wastes and fires on the public landfills. Additional environmental benefits include the reduction of top soil to entomb waste, recovery of recyclable materials and the reduction of the seepage of contaminants into the subsurface.OTECOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) processes also represent an exploitable renewable resource.  As the Bahamas Banks are characterised by steep drop-offs, most of the major islands have a location where OTEC technology would be feasible; however, this technology is at the experimental stage.  Seawater district cooling could also be used in these locations, but there are few with appreciable demands for it. Deep-well reverse thermal conversion may also be an exploitable source of energy.Geothermal/HydropowerThere has been little investigation into the potentials for these resources in the Bahamas, although studies indicate some geothermal potential in the Green Bahamas Bank region.

Energy framework

There is no clear national policy supporting the implementation of grid-connected RE / WE projects and EE measures. Recognizing that Bahamas depends on imported fuels to satisfy over 99% of its energy demand and since electricity is projected to grow at 8% over the next five years as a result of several new developments, in 2008 the Government of the Bahamas (GoBH) decided to commit to the following National Energy Vision:“The Bahamas will become a world leader in the development and implementation of sustainable energy opportunities by aggressively re-engineering our legislative, regulatory and institutional frameworks; retooling our human resources; and implementing a diverse range of well researched and regulated, environmentally sensitive and sustainable energy programs and initiatives, built upon geographical (both proximity and diversity), climatic ( sun, wind and sea) and traditional economic strengths (tourism and banking).”To support this vision, the GoBH has appointed the National Energy Policy Committee (NEPC) that has drafted a preliminary National Energy Policy. The draft is under revision by an external consultant financed by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). To date, the NEP has not been adopted by the government as policy.Sustainable Energy Projects in the BahamasThe Bahamas received an IDB grant for Implementing Sustainable Energy Projects by the end of 2009. This programme will: (i) provide technical assistance to the GoBH to achieve EE in public buildings, the residential and commercial sectors,  in particular the phase-out of incandescent lights by replacing them with CFLs and installation of Solar Water Heater (SWH) systems in households; (ii) implement pilot projects in RE, particularly a demonstration project for household Photovoltaic (PV) systems connected to the grid using net metering devices; (iii) strengthen the energy sector in Bahamas; (iv) support the Government with a review of energy legislation, regulatory and policy issues to promote sustainable energy as well as institutional strengthening in the areas EE and RE.

Source
Static Source:
  • Good Practice Study on GHG-Inventories for the Waste Sector in Non-Annex l Countries

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    The study aims to provide comprehensive guidance to policy makers and practitioners in developing countries [Non-Annex I countries to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)] for the preparation of national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories for the waste sector. Though GHG emissions from the waste sector are still comparatively low compared to other sectors, they are continuously rising in developing countries due to changing production and consumption patterns. Experience shows that emissions from this sector can be reduced significantly at relatively low costs.

  • Broschüre “Cool bleiben: Das Spannungsfeld zwischen Wachstum, Kühlung und Klimawandel“

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    1. Steigender Energiebedarf und ein Recht auf Kühlung? Darf es ihn geben, den Anspruch auf eine Klimaanlage und einen Kühlschrank – ähnlich wie das Recht auf eine Heizung? 2. Kühle Kette für eine gesunde Versorgung Nach Schätzungen der Weltgesundheitsorganisation (WHO) verderben durchschnittlich 30 Prozent, in tropischen Ländern sogar 50 Prozent der Lebensmittel mangels angemessener Lagerung. 3. Grüne Technik und Wertschöpfung Das Zauberwort heißt Ressourceneffizienz. Der Schlüssel in der Kältetechnik dafür sind natürliche Gase. 4.

  • Buenas Practicas de refrigeración

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This manual should provide professional guidance on how to service and maintain refrigeration systems operating with new technology, e.g. ozone- and climate-friendly alternative refrigerants to CFCs and HCFCs. It addresses essential know-how on containment of HFC refrigerants which have a high global warming potential (GWP) and provides information on the safe use of environmental-friendly natural refrigerants, such as CO2, ammonia or hydrocarbons.

  • Cool und nachhaltig: Kühlung in der internationalen Zusammenarbeit

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    Kühlschrank und Klimaanlage – sie stehen ganz oben auf der Wunschliste von Menschen in heißen Ländern. Bis zum Jahr 2030 rechnet die Internationale Energieagentur (IEA) mit einem viermal höheren Energiebedarf für Klimatisierung in den Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern im Vergleich zu heute. Auch werden oft chemisch hergestellte Gase als Kühlmittel eingesetzt. Sie schädigen die Ozonschicht und treiben den Klimawandel voran. Grüne Technologien nutzen hingegen natürliche Gase zur Kälteerzeugung, sind energieeffizienter und können mit Sonnen- oder Windkraft betrieben werden.

  • Cool and sustainable: Refrigeration and international cooperation

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    Refrigerators and air conditioning units feature high on the wish lists of people in hot countries. The International Energy Agency (IEA) calculates that by the year 2030 the energy consumption for air conditioning in developing countries and emerging nations will be four times what it is today. It is often the case that the gases used as refrigerants are produced chemically. They are damaging to the ozone layer and accelerate climate change. By contrast green technologies use natural gases in the cooling process, are more energy efficient and can be driven by sun or wind power.

  • Factsheet: Green Cooling Initiative

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Due to the rising temperatures, population, urbanization and economic growth, the demand of cooling and air conditioning is steadily increasing. The “Green Cooling Network” was established in order to promote a dialogue between stakeholders from industries, policy, research and non-governmental organizations. The project aims to implement the Cancun decisions to build efficient processes and structures that serve to accelerate the technology transfer for mitigation and adaptation in developing countries.

  • Factsheet: Proklima - Green cooling for a warming world

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    Almost as much energy is used for refrigeration, air conditioning and insulation worldwide as for transport or heating. On behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), the GIZ ‘Proklima’ project has now been working for some 15 years to help introduce environment- and climate-friendly alternatives to ozonedepleting industrial gases (such as chlorofluorocarbon, CFCs) in partner countries. Proklima thus supports developing and emerging countries in fulfilling their obligations arising from the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer.

  • Factsheet: Proklima - Protection of the ozone layer, Technology transfer with cooperation with private industry

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Initiated by the detection of the so called “ozone hole” over the Antarctic, the Montreal Protocol on Substances that deplete the Ozone Layer came into force in 1987. The Protocol regulates the phase-out of production and consumption of ozone-depleting substances, such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) in refrigeration and air conditioning. This phase-out has led to the introduction of new, environmental-friendly technologies in industrialized countries.

  • Good Practices in Refrigeration

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This manual should provide professional guidance on how to service and maintain refrigeration systems operating with new technology, e.g. ozone- and climate-friendly alternative refrigerants to CFCs and HCFCs. It addresses essential know-how on containment of HFC refrigerants which have a high global warming potential (GWP) and provides information on the safe use of environmental-friendly natural refrigerants, such as CO2, ammonia or hydrocarbons.