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Bosnia and Herzegovina

Official Name:
Bosnia and Herzegovina

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Research and academic institution
Name:
Mr. Goran Trbic
Phone:
+387 65 621 916
Emails:
trbicgoran@yahoo.com, trbicg@pmfbl.org

Energy profile

Bosnia and Herzegovina (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

National electrification rate (2002):  98.5%The World Bank’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Report indicates that district heating is available only in 40% of urban areas and gas is available in 20% of urban areas.  In non-urban and mixed areas it is virtually unavailable and poverty rates here vary from 20% to 24%.Electricity is transmitted throughout the country via a network of 400 kV (864.93 km), 220 kV (1525.5 km) and 110 kV (3888.82) transmission and distribution lines, with 36 total interconnections.

Renewable energy potential

There are two major renewable energy sources in Bosnia and Herzegovina: hydropower for electricity production and biomass for heat production.According to the CETEOR study, the estimated potential for the renewables is as follows: HydropowerThe theoretical potential for hydro potential in the country is estimated at 8,000 MW. With an installed capacity of 2052 MW (53% of electricity generation), hydropower is already highly significant in Bosnia and Herzegovina, although its potential is far from being fully exploited yet (37% of economic potential). The majority of the installations are more than 30 yrs old. Average precipitation in the country is 1250 mm/m2, the third highest in the region after Montenegro and Slovenia, although these volumes of water are not evenly distributed, neither spatially or temporally. Small hydro is regarded as the most promising source of new renewable energy for the country. Currently, there are ten small, mini or micro hydro plants in operation, with a total capacity of 31 MW. Another two plants are under construction (1.8 MW) and 20 more are planned, totalling a further 28 MW.Wind energyTotal wind potential in the country is estimated at 2,000 MW, of which approximately 900 MW is exploitable. There are promising wind values shown by measurements taken before the war for the region of Trebinje through Mostar to Bugojno, and more up-to-date measurements from meteorological stations and airports which reveal large areas of the country with wind velocities of over 10 m/s at a height of 10 m on 150 days in the year.Biomass energyThe potential is present for biomass energy to provide 14% of the total energy supply, versus the actual 6.5% of the total energy consumption.  An estimated 34.5 PJ of energy is available as biomass resource in the country, predominantly firewood, grain residues, and residues from log processing. Potential co-generation amounts to 410 MW of heat and approximately 200 MW of electricity per annum, with an additional 600 MW of estimated thermal capacity being available from wood wastes. The potential of biogas from the agricultural sector as an energy source has also been recognised, although no in-depth study has currently been conducted. Near Sarajevo, a landfill gas plant with a 350 kW generator has been built with Austrian support; its capacity is due to be doubled in the near future. The electricity is fed into the urban grid. However, remuneration for electricity generated from biomass sources is low in Bosnia, currently standing at 3.81 € cents/kWh.Geothermal powerGeothermal potential has been estimated at 33 MWt. Thermal plants of 50 – 100 MW have also been proposed as a potential power source for district heating programs.Solar energyBosnia and Herzegovina, in common with other nations of the former Yugoslavia, has a good solar regime. Theoretical potential has been estimated at 74.65 PWh per annum, with solar irradiation figures of 1 240 kWh/m²/yr in the north of the country and up to 1 600 kWh/m²/yr in the south. Despite this, current utilisation of solar power is low in the country.

Energy framework

Bosnia and Herzegovina ratified the Energy Charter Treaty and the Protocol on Energy Efficiency and Related Environmental Aspects (PEEREA) in 2001 , which makes a commitment to formulate or implement policies for improving energy efficiency and reducing the negative environmental impact of the energy cycle. An in-depth review of energy efficiency policies of Bosnia and Herzegovina was carried out in 2011, following a regular review report submitted by the Bosnia and Herzegovina authorities in 2008.The Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers define the priorities with respect to energy efficiency.  These include:The development and implementation of a clear, well designed energy policy and appropriate action plans to encourage energy saving in households and industry;To reduce energy consumption; use existing and available technologies such as heat insulation, air recycling, more efficient electric appliances etc.As a priority, encourage greater use of public transportation and rationalize use of cars in cities and increase awareness on savings, through increased energy efficiency.“Decision about a Methodology for the Determination of Purchase Prices for Electricity from Renewable Sources with Installed Power up to 5 MW (“OG of FBiH” 32/2002, “OG of RS” 71/2003)” obliges the federal power utility companies of BiH to purchase electricity from renewable sources. The tariff prices are determined by means of applying a corrective coefficient to the current electricity tariff item on 10 (20) kV lines, depending on the renewable resource the electricity was generated from. Values are as follows:Small hydropower plants 0.80 (3.96 € cents/kWh)Power plants on biogas from the waste area and biomass 0.77 (3.81 € cents/kWh)Power plants on wind and geothermal sources 1.00 (4.95 € cents/kWh)Power plants on solar energy 1.10 (5.44 € cents/kWh)On September 2009 the Government of RS issued a draft of the Energy Development Strategy of the Republic of Srpska, with general objectives including the increased use of domestic energy sources to improve energy security, and the use of modern technologies for energy production and consumption, as well as increasing energy efficiency at all levels of the energy sector, and involving the public in making decisions about the construction of energy facilities.

Source
Static Source:
  • Communicating Extreme Weather Event Attribution: Research from Kenya and India

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Climate change attribution analysis assesses the likelihood that a particular extreme weather event has been made more or less likely as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Communication of extreme event attribution information in the immediate aftermath of an extreme event provides a window of opportunity to inform, educate, and affect a change in attitude or behaviour in order to mitigate or prepare for climate change.

  • Hydrological Zoning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Hydrological zoning (or simply zoning) is an approach to divide land into different zones based on their hydrological properties. Typically, each type of zone has different land use and development regulations linked to it. This land and water management method aims to protect local water sources from risks of over-abstraction, land salinization, groundwater pollution and waterlogging by managing land use activities based on the assigned hydrological zones.  For example, zones with a high groundwater table, large amounts of surface water (e.g.

  • Pöyry Austria GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Pöyry Austria GmbH, a member of the global Pöyry Group, is a consulting and engineering company with deep expertise with extensive local knowledge to deliver sustainable project investments. For instance, its Hydro Consulting department delivers services in the fields of hydrological and hydraulic modellingand forecasting. Its experts have significant experience in the fields of hydro-meteorology, climate change and climate sensitivity. They also contribute to assess climate risk and ctimate adaptation measures for hydropower and all other sectors of water management.

  • Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ambientale Università degli Studi di Firenze

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Italy
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    University of Florence traces its origins to the Studium established in 1321.UNIFI applies to CTN with its Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (DICEA) which researches climate change in relation to transport, infrastructure and mobility.There is a team dedicated to mobility which has 20 years experience coordinating international research projects.

  • Energy Efficiency (Policies and Measures Database)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Energy Efficiency Policies and Measures database provides information on policies and measures taken or planned to improve energy efficiency. The database further supports the IEA G8 Gleneagles Plan of Action mandate to “share best practice between participating governments”, and the agreement by IEA Energy Ministers in 2009 to promote energy efficiency and close policy gaps.

  • Green Resources & Energy Analysis Tool (GREAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The GREAT Tool for Cities is an integrated bottom-up, energy end-use based modelling and accounting tool for tracking energy consumption, production and resource extraction in all economic sectors on a city, provincial or regional level. The model uses the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) software developed by the Stockholm Environmental Institute and includes a national average dataset on energy input parameters for residential, commercial, transport, industry and agriculture end-use sectors.

  • Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficient Retrofits (COMBAT)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Objective:

    The Commercial Building Analysis Tool for Energy-Efficiency Retrofit (COMBAT) is created to facilitate policy makers, facility managers, and building retrofit practitioners to estimate commercial (public) buildings retrofit energy saving, cost and payback period. Common commercial building models area created, and the retrofit measures and their effects are pre-computed by EnergyPlus by taking different building types and measures interactions into account.