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Armenia

Official Name:
Republic of Armenia
Region:

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Specialized agency
Name:
Mr. Mikael Abovyan
Position:
President of the Board of Technology Transfer Association UJP
Phone:
+37410 55 62 53
Emails:
mikael.abovyan@gmail.com

Energy profile

Armenia (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

N/A

Renewable energy potential

Hydropower The hydro potential of Armenia has been evaluated to be about 21.8 billion kWh/year, including 18.6 billion kWh from large and medium rivers and 3.2 billion kWh from small rivers. According to the Renewable Energy Armenia webpage, the economically feasible hydropower potential is about 3.6 billion kWh, with 1.5 billion kWh already utilized. The remaining hydropower potential is to be developed during the next 15 years. The total output of large and small hydropower existing in the country, as of January 2011, is 1,256 MW or 3,746 million kWh. There are 70 small hydroelectric plants operating with an installed capacity of 89 MW; in January 2009, building licences were issued for 64, and more are foreseen, along with several major plants.WindThe average annual wind velocity in Armenia is distributed unevenly in the range of 1.0 to 8.0 meters per second. In some regions, particularly in the Ararat Valley, strong mountain valley winds are quite common. For instance, during the summer months the velocity of these winds oftentimes reaches 20 m/s or more. Despite a relatively attractive wind regime in many parts of the country, the only operational wind power facility in Armenia today is the 2.6 MW Lori-1 pilot wind power project comprised of four 660 kW Iranian-assembled Vestas wind turbines.  A second, the Iran-Armenia Wind Farm, is under construction.BiomassBiomass energy in Armenia has the potential to provide significant power, if utilized. Armenia has reasonable areas of land covered by forests and lands for agricultural industry, including farming of plants and animals. These areas can potentially produce residues which could be used as fuel for biomass combustion or gasification, as well as biogas production through anaerobic digestion. Forest residues (slash from forest thinnings or waste wood from sawmills) can provide a concentrated resource to be used as fuel for energy production. Agricultural residues can provide a range of residues, including crop residues (corn stover, nutshells, fruit tree branches, etc.) and animal wastes.SolarArmenia is rich in solar energy resources, the utilization of which will reduce the need for imports of other energy sources. The average annual solar radiation is approximately 1,720 kWh/m2 compared to the average annual European solar radiation of 1,000 kWh/m2. Over a quarter of the territory of the country has solar resources with an intensity of 1,850 kWh/m2.The need to promote EE in Armenia is going to increase due to the fact that the upcoming decommissioning of the nuclear power plant by 2016 requires the country to develop RE. Additionally, Armenia is a signatory of such international agreements as Copenhagen Accord, under which the country has committed to increasing energy production based on RE sources and improving EE in all sectors of the economy, as well as in buildings and construction. Better use of the potential of EE will limit the dependency of the country on imported fuel.GeothermalRecent geologic surveys funded by the World Bank show that on the Syunik volcanic plateau, the Jermaghbyur region presents the best region for extracting geothermal power. The water temperature at 2500-3000 m is about 250o C. Using single flash technology this site can produce approximately 25 MW of electric power.  In addition to Jermaghpyur, two more geothermal sites; Karkar and Gridzor are being investigated under the WB/Geo-Fund.

Energy framework

Currently, the "Energy Law of the Republic of Armenia" guarantees the market for electricity produced by all small hydropower plants (SHPPs, total capacity up to 10 MW per plant) in Armenia. According to this Law (Article 59, Clause 1.c), adopted by the Armenian Parliament in April 2001, "All electricity (capacity) generated at small hydro power plants, as well as from renewable sources of energy within the next 15 years shall be purchased pursuant to the Market Rules".As of January 2009, the announced feed in tariff is approximately 0.09 USD/kWh (31.343 AMD/KWh) without value added tax. Some of the basic principles of the policy are as followsEnhancement of competition and efficient operation in the energy sector.Regulation on energy sector operations.Protection and balance of interests between consumers and economic entities.Efficient use of domestic and alternative sources of energy, and the creation of economic and legal mechanisms to serve that purpose.Encouragement of investments, safety and environmental protection in the energy sector.Separation of the generation, transmission, and distribution system operator.Energy Saving and Renewable Energy LawAccording to the Energy Saving and Renewable Energy Law, ratified in December 2004, the principles of Armenian policy in energy saving and renewable energy are:1) Increasing the level of supply of indigenous renewable energy carriers to satisfy the energy demand of the economy,2) Implementation of energy saving strategies, as well as development and enforcement of legal and economic mechanisms for the promotion of renewable energy,3) Ensuring increasing usage of renewable energy resources as well as the application and development of new renewable energy technologies aimed at its promotion,4) Ensuring competitiveness of renewable energy resources and protection/enforcement of the rights of businesses engaged in the area of renewable energy,5) Ensuring high priority of issues of environmental protection and efficient (economic) usage of natural resources while implementing measures/activities aimed at the development of energy saving and renewable energy; etc.According to the Law, legal and physical persons using, producing and importing energy devices can submit those in the manner established by the Law on Certification of Compliance of Goods and Services with Normative Requirements for voluntary certification based on energy efficiency indicators. The costs are, however, carried by the mentioned legal (physical) persons. Further, all certified energy devices will be labelled.Water CodeThis Code, which has been adopted on 4 June 2002, establishes procedures to obtain water permit for hydro power plants. According to this Code water permit for a hydro power plant is given for 3 years at the first, but once the plant is operational or even it is under construction, then the permit is extended for a much longer period. The purpose of this provision is to prevent people getting a water permit and then not proceeding to construct the project. However, land lease for the project outlined in the Land Code dated 2 May 2001 is not in synch with this provision because there are not such time limits for the land lease.Land CodeProcedures to obtain the right to use the land for an energy related project, such a SHPP, are outlined in this code. Land can either be leased or purchased. The general plan of various areas does not have specific land parcels identified as of energy type use. Therefore, procedures in this code need to be followed to change the land us category. A governmental decision is required for any land use category change.

Source
Static Source:
  • Eco Ltd

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    United Kingdom
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Eco is a boutique management consultancy specialized in the design and formulation of climate change mitigation and adaptation projects. Operating since 2000, Eco has worked with a wide range of international clients such as the AfDB, IFC, World Bank, UNDP, UNIDO, EBRD, GIZ and the European Union.

    Eco has designed over 250 projects in 82 countries across Africa, Eastern Europe and Asia. We have assessed markets and designed financial, technology and other strategies and then formulated projects.

  • Okapi Environmental Consulting Incorporated

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Okapi Environmental Consulting Incorporated (OECI) is a private sector organization established in 2011 with the mission to provide quality technical and policy advice on sustainable development. Okapi's work includes project design, management and evaluation, strategic planning, capacity development, resource mobilization, scientific and technical advisory services, technology transfer. Okapi's experience extends in climate-affected sectors such as agriculture, sustainable land and water management, coastal zone management, infrastructure and others.

  • Sustainable Capital Advisors

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    SCA provides strategy consulting and financial advisory services to public and private sector organizations seeking to implement sustainable infrastructure projects. Our client engagements involve a diversity of technologies located in countries across the world. Our job is to assist clients "sift through the noise" and develop practical and replicable solutions based on the realities of the financial and energy markets. 

  • International Water Management Institute

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Sri Lanka
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    IWMI’s Mission is to provide evidence-based solutions to sustainably manage water and land resources for food security, people’s livelihoods and the environment. IWMI’s Vision is ‘a water-secure world’. IWMI targets water and land management challenges faced by poor communities in the developing countries, and through this contributes towards the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of reducing poverty and hunger, and maintaining a sustainable environment. 

  • STENUM GmbH

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Austria
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    STENUM has worked for UNIDO, UNEP and IFC in training their Resource Efficient and Cleaner Production Centers and supporting them in the implementation of various activities (education of national experts, consultancy of companies in waster reduction, water minimization, chemicals management and energy efficiency). STENUM has elaborated several manuals and training materials (UNIDO train the trainer toolkit, UNEP PRESME toolkit).

  • Ecofys a Navigant company

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Netherlands
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Ecofys, a Navigant company, is an international energy and climate consultancy focused on sustainable energy for everyone. Founded in 1984, the company is a trusted advisor to governments, corporations, NGOs, and energy providers worldwide. The team delivers powerful results in the energy and climate transition sectors. Working across the entire energy value chain, Ecofys develops innovative solutions and strategies to support its clients in enabling the energy transition and working through the challenges of climate change.

  • Integra Government Services International LLC

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    United States
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Integra designs, implements, and evaluates international development activities, with a focus on creating opportunities for the poor, expanding access to public infrastructure, promoting social and ecological resilience and strengthening donor programs. Integra has a proven record of innovative approaches yielding lasting results. Integra is a partner of NASA in deploying state-of-the-art Earth Observation technology for REDD+ MRV, while working to build on-the-ground socio-ecological resilience. 

     

  • HEAT - Habitat, Energy Application & Technology

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Germany
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    HEAT is a independent consulting company focussed on the development and implementation of projects for climate and ozone protection. HEAT has a focus on technology cooperation, policy advice for climate protection technologies, particular in the areas of energy efficiency, cooling and refrigeration, F-gases, inventories, roadmaps, carrying out technical and economic feasibility studies and capacity building measures such as training and certification. HEAT is also the Coordination Office of the NDE Germany.

  • World Coal Association

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    United Kingdom
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    World Coal Association is the global industry association formed of major international coal producers and stakeholders. The WCA works to demonstrate and gain acceptance for the role coal plays in achieving a sustainable and lower carbon energy future. World coal organization's regular policy analysis, workshops, media updates and strategic research provide access to  the highest level of information on the global coal industry and its role in energy, climate and sustainable development issues. 

     

  • Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Ireland
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    Environmental Research Institute (ERI) is a flagship Institute for Environmental, Marine and Energy research in Ireland. The ERI has over 300 researchers working in interdisciplinary and currently has 45 live research projects focused on climate mitigation, adaptation and understanding. Focus areas include energy modelling, marine renewables, biofuels, energy efficiency, climate adaptation platforms, modelling greenhouse gas fluxes, atmospheric chemistry and carbon liabilities.