Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
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Afghanistan

Official Name:
Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Specialized agency
Name:
Mr. Gulam Hassan Amiry
Position:
Head of Climate Change
Phone:
+93797387299
Emails:
ghulamamiry@hotmail.com

Energy profile

Afghanistan (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Seven regional electricity grids exist with supply coming from domestic hydro and thermal generation and imported power. The country has never had high rates of electrification - less than 10% of the population have intermittent access to publicly provided power. Many load centres across the country are supplied with electricity for only two to three hours a day. In remote rural areas, off-grid and mini-grid solutions remain the only feasible solution for the provision of electricity. Renewable energy sources (RES), especially mini and micro-hydropower, are being implemented to varying degrees across the country.

Renewable energy potential

The limited reach of regional grids mean that smaller scale off grid renewable energy (RE) technologies (such as small hydro, solar PV, solar thermal and wind) can play a significant role in the provision of energy.Afghanistan has significant renewable resources, primarily in the form of hydropower. It is estimated that 23,000MW of hydropower resources potential are available but only 260MW have been developed thus far. In mountainous areas there is sufficient head to make even very low flow streams effective, and glacier-fed streams provide year-round minimum water flow.Solar resources are also good given the high altitudes and approximately 300 days of sunshine a year, which provide about 6.5 kWh/m2/day. The wind power potential is high in Herat province but less strong in other regions. Geothermal resources may also be feasible in the longer term.The use of sustainable biomass for power generation would require significant reforestation and irrigation efforts. Afghanistan now has only 3% forest or woody shrub land cover and this continues to be deforested for the illegal timber trade in Pakistan and domestic heat and cooking purposes. The biogas potential is also quite low.

Energy framework

In 2006, the Government and the international community produced an interim version of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS) and Afghanistan Compact that include provisions for developing the energy sector. A significant proportion of the population relies primarily on electricity produced by costly diesel generators as opposed to lower cost options such as imported power or domestic energy sources such as natural gas, hydro, solar, and wind.A broad goal of the ANDS is the development of an energy sector energy sector that provides reliable, affordable energy increasingly based on market-based private sector investment and public sector oversight. Target goals include:reaching at least 65% of households in major urban areas,reaching 90% of non-residential establishments in major urban areas,reaching 25% of households in rural areas, andcovering at least 75% of total operating costs through user fees by the end of 2010.At present, there is no clear institutional framework or policy for rural electrification nor a clear division of responsibility amongst the ministries involved in the sector. There is a need to develop a robust enabling environment (such as through the articulation of a rural electrification policy) that encourages community buy-in, and emphasises the roles of Community Development Councils (CDCs), and the private sector in advancing rural electrification. 

Source
Static Source:
  • Behineh Sazan Sanat Tasisat

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Iran
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    Behineh Sazan Sanat Tasisat (BSST) is a company with theoretical knowledge and industrial experience in climate change mitigation, such as increasing energy efficiency. BSST attempts to achieve its targets by:

  • 2014-2015 CTCN Progress Report

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    The Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN) presents its Progress report (2014- August 2015), which highlights CTCN results in key services (technical assistance, access to information and scaling up international collaboration). 

  • 2016 CTCN Progress Report

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    2016 CTCN Progress Report launched. Developing country trends in climate technology transfer needs presented. The report presents an overview of CTCN services: technical assistance, capacity building and knowledge sharing. 

  • 2017 CTCN Progress Report

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    In its 2017 Progress Report, the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN) describes the key types of technology-related assistance that developing countries are seeking as they strive to fullfill their Nationally Determined Contributions and National Adaptation Plans.  The report also explores how the CTCN is building new bridges to financing and laying the groundwork for sustained uptake of technologies through collective action on several important fronts. 

  • Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Australia
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member

    One of Australia's original tertiary institutions, RMIT University enjoys an international reputation for excellence in professional and vocational education, applied research, and engagement with the needs of industry and the community. RMIT work across the globe in the fields of art and design; architecture; built environment, education; engineering; development; computer science and information systems; business and management; and communication and media studies.