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United Kingdom

Official name: 

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

National Designated Entity
Type of organisation: Government/Ministry
Name: 
Ben Lyon
Position: 
Head of UK Delegation
Phone: 
+44 (0) 300 068 5039, +44 (0) 7920 781 638
Emails: 
ben.lyon@decc.gsi.gov.uk
  • Sustainable Water: Chemical Science Priorities Summary Report

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday, January 1, 2007
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    This report outlines how chemistry can address this grand challenge throughout the hydrological cycle. Chemistry can rise to this challenge because chemical scientists have a unique understanding of water chemistry, which is critical in developing appropriate solutions. Also, many water contaminants, such as arsenic, are chemicals and an understanding of chemistry is required to analyse and treat them. The report addresses key issues in sustainable water.

  • Small-Scale Glass Recycling Technology

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday, January 9, 2005
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    In the drive to divert waste materials from landfill, glass, although not biologically active, is often an obvious choice for recycling as it is both bulky and heavy. It is also well established in the public mind as being recyclable. Yet in remote rural areas the tonnages diverted are often very small and the consequential costs of collecting and transporting segregated glass can often be prohibitive. However, it is possible to process glass into a range of products that can be used locally, and this report reviews the extremely small-scale technologies available.

  • Public Funding for Innovation in Low Carbon Technologies in the UK

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday, January 10, 2013
    Objective: 

    In response to the weakness of poor and incoherent delivery framework for the promotion of renewable energy, this briefing reviews the UK Government's progress in addressing these institutional and policy issues. In particular, it examines the landscape for public funding support for innovation in technology that will reduce carbon emissions associated with the generation or use of energy, generally known as "low carbon technology".

  • Polyscape: A GIS Mapping Framework Providing Efficient and Spatially Explicit Landscape-Scale Valuation of Multiple Ecosystem Services

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Friday, January 4, 2013
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    This paper introduces a GIS framework (Polyscape) designed to explore spatially explicit synergies and trade-offs amongst ecosystem services to support landscape management (from individual fields through to catchments of ca 10,000 km2 scale). Algorithms are described and results presented from a case study application within an upland Welsh catchment (Pontbren). Polyscape currently includes algorithms to explore the impacts of land cover change on flood risk, habitat connectivity, erosion and associated sediment delivery to receptors, carbon sequestration and agricultural productivity.

  • Low Carbon Technologies for Energy-Intensive Industries

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday, February 16, 2012
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    According to this report, energy-intensive industries such as chemicals, paper, ceramics, cement, iron and steel are responsible for 45% of carbon emissions from businesses and the public sector in the United Kingdom. The report discusses carbon dioxide abatement technologies for these industries and policies to support their adoption. It also discusses policy as well as existing and transformative technologies.

  • Adapting to Climate Change: Helping Key Sectors to Adapt to Climate Change

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday, January 3, 2012
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    From the energy, transport and water sectors, 103 organisations have provided reports under the Adaptation Reporting Power (ARP) to Defra. The reports demonstrate that these organisations are assessing their risks from climate change and in many cases are well-placed to mitigate them. Nearly all of the 103 organisations who reported can be clustered together into nine sectors: aviation; electricity distributors; electricity generators; electricity transmitters; gas transporters; ports and lighthouses; public bodies; road and rail; and water.

  • Zero carbon Britain: rethinking the future

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday, July 16, 2013
    Objective: 

    This report explores how Britain can achieve Carbon neutrality. Building upon the groundwork laid by the Zero Carbon Britain project over the last six years, the authors incorporate the latest developments in science and technology, plus more detailed research in two main areas: balancing highly variable energy supply and demand; and the nutritional implications of a low carbon diet. The report highlights the need for further research on adaptation, economic transition and policy that would achieve sufficient greenhouse gas emissions reductions quickly and equitably.

  • Managing the land in a changing climate

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Wednesday, July 10, 2013
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    This report is part of a series of annual progress reports by the Adaptation Sub-Committee to assess how the United Kingdom is preparing for the major risks and opportunities presented by climate change. Together these reports will provide the baseline evidence for the Committee’s statutory report to Parliament on preparedness due in 2015.

  • Climate Change in UK Security Policy: Implications for Development Assistance?

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday, January 1, 2012
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    The paper explores changes related to the inclusion and framing of climate change in UK security policy and the possible implications for overseas development assistance (ODA). It is argued that the framing of climate change within the security realm does not necessarily equate to a subsequent shift in UK ODA programming priorities and funding allocations. There is evidence to suggest climate change has been ‘securitised’. However, if securitisation is understood to mean a subsequent change in practice, programming and funding, this has not occurred in ODA.

  • Mirage and oasis: energy choices in an age of global warming

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday, January 1, 2005
    Objective: 

    This article argues that renewable energy is a more cost-effective, flexible, secure, and reliable solution to climate change than nuclear power. The benefits of renewables and microgeneration over nuclear power can be summarised as follows:

    renewable sources are quicker to build
    they do not leave a trace of radioactive waste that is harmful for the environment
    they are abundant and cheap to harvest in the UK as well as globally
    they create more jobs, contributing to economic development in the UK and abroad

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