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Kyrgyzstan

Official name: 

Kyrgyz Republic

Region: 
UN group: 
Landlocked developing countries
Country income: 
Lower-middle-income economies
UNFCCC Annex 1 status: 
Non Annex 1 Party to the Convention

Kyrgyzstan (2012)

Energy profile
  • INDC of Kyrgyzstan

    Type: 
    National Plan
    Type of National plan: 
    Country: 

    Kyrgyz Republic will reduce GHG emissions in the range of 11.49 - 13.75% below BAU in 2030. Additionally, under the international support Kyrgyz Republic could implement the mitigation measures to achieve total reduction in the range of 29.00 - 30.89% below BAU in 2030. Kyrgyz Republic will reduce GHG emissions in the range of 12.67 - 15.69% below BAU in 2050. Additionally, under the international support Kyrgyz Republic could implement the mitigation measures to achieve total reduction in the range of 35.06 - 36.75% below BAU in 2050. The INDC also includes Adaptation contribution.

  • Ten Questions to Ask about Integrated Resources Planning

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 May 2014

    This report attempts to capture the critical features and complexities of resource and electricity planning. According to the report, an integrated resources plan—which includes an embedded and dedicated electricity plan—is most effective when created through a planning process that is informed by public involvement and active dialogue with national policymakers, state agencies, customer and industry advocacy groups, project developers and civil society.

  • 10 Questions to Ask About Electricity Tariffs

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Tuesday 1 April 2014

    10 Questions to Ask about Electricity Tariffs attempts to capture some of the critical dimensions of tariff determination, primarily in regulated markets. Tariff determination—the process of determining the price of electricity to consumers—has far-reaching impacts throughout the electricity sector. It not only affects the financial viability of the sector and the quality and affordability of consumer services, but it also raises social and environmental concerns. The questions raised can serve multiple functions.

  • Climate change in a small transboundary tributary of the Syr Darya calls for effective cooperation and adaptation.

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
    Objective: 

    This article focuses on cooperative adaptation strategies at the community, water user association, district, and national levels along the Khojabakirgansai, a small transboundary tributary of the Syr Darya in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Data were collected in the basin through in-depth expert interviews, site visits, and household surveys, and were triangulated with climate change data from the available literature. Basin inhabitants cooperate on extreme events that are exacerbated by climate change, including water scarcity, droughts, and flash floods.

  • CF UNISON

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member

    Since 2002, CF UNISON works on civil society issues and has been continuously present in Central Asia, conducting projects on energy efficiency, climate change, sustainable development and good governance. 

  • Youth Ecological Centre

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member

    Youth EcoCenter of Tajikistan (YEC) is a public social-ecological organization working with communities in the field of sustainable resource management, climate resilience improvement and organization of awareness raising campaigns and educational programs. YEC took an active part in climate change and environment policy decisions making process at the national level and assisted in development of the National Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation and implementation of the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) in Tajikistan.

  • Coalition for “green” economy and development “G-Global”

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member

    Coalition for green economy and development “G-Global” was based in 2013, the main mission of this coalition is to provide the passing to “green economy”. “G-global” aims to find the substitution of burning fossil fuels on alternative energy sources. Every year the population’s demand is increasing, thus it leads to air contamination .Moreover,  “G-Global” develops the production of organic food. In December 2015 coalition became the owner of the eco-mark “organic KZ”. Coalition provides the transfer of organic food to local markets located in Astana.

  • Agroforestry for landscape restoration and livelihood development in Central Asia

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Thursday 1 January 2015
    Objective: 
    Approach: 

    This paper discusses how the adoption of agroforestry for ecosystem and livelihood improvement in Central Asian countries can be enhanced.

  • Adapting to Climate Change in the Most Vulnerable Sectors of Central Asia: Water and Agriculture

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Friday 1 February 2013
    Objective: 

    According to this report, five countries of Central Asia--Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, located in the heart of the Eurasian continent--are characterized by arid climate conditions. Climate change phenomena such as increasing air temperatures, strong droughts and dry winds, have an impact on balance of water resources, soil conditions, crop yields, pasture productivity, conditions of natural ecosystems and human health.

  • Climate Change and International Water Conflict in Central Asia

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Sunday 1 January 2012
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    This report is a critical assessment of the neo-Malthusian claim that climatic changes can be an important source of international tensions, and in the extreme, even in militarized interstate disputes. The most likely scenario is conflict over water allocation in international catchments that are shared by poorer, less democratic, and politically less stable countries, governed by weak international water management institutions, and exposed to severe climatic changes.

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