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Eastern Asia

  • DNV GL

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Driven by its purpose of safeguarding life, property and the environment, DNV GL enables organisations to advance the safety and sustainability of their business. Operating in more than 100 countries, DNV GL’s 16,000 professionals are dedicated to helping the maritime, oil & gas, energy and other industries to make the world safer, smarter and greener.

  • Carbon Counts

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    Carbon Counts is a private sector organization established in 2008. It is an independent consultancy providing a range of advice in the field of climate change. It has a focus on international climate change policy, in particular technology development, deployment, financing and regulation. 

     

  • Business Council for Sustainable Energy

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member

    The Business Council for Sustainable Energy is a coalition of renewable energy, energy efficiency and natural gas industries in the U.S. The organization aims to accelerate the implementation of market based approaches to reduce pollution and provide a diverse, secure mix of energy resources. Industry leaders work together in the BCSE to create a more secure and sustainable energy future, to meet U.S. energy needs and lift the U.S. economy.

  • Renewable Energy Policy Network for 21st Century

    Knowledge partner
    Type: 
    Organisation
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner

    REN21 is a global renewable energy policy network that connects a wide range of key stakeholders to facilitate knowledge exchange, policy development and joint action towards a rapid global transition to renewable energy. The REN21 Secretariat is located in Paris, France. Together, REN21 and REEEP established http://www.reegle.info, an information portal on clean energy policy, regulation and financing.

  • Global Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration: 
    Relation to CTCN: 
    Network Member

    The Global CCS Institute is an international membership organisation that works to accelerate the development, demonstration and deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS), a vital technology to tackle climate change and provide energy security. CCS is used to help cut down green house gas emissions by preventing CO2 from being released into the atmosphere. The Institute was established in 2009 with initial funding from the Australian Government to accelerate the development of CCS globally.

  • Technology Roadmap: Energy-Efficient Buildings Heating and Cooling Equipment

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday, January 1, 2011
    Objective: 

    The IEA Technology Roadmap Energy-Efficient Buildings: Heating and Cooling Equipment shows how technologies such as solar thermal, heat pumps, thermal energy storage and combined heat and power for buildings have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by up to 2 gigatonnes (Gt) by 2050--around one-quarter of today"s emissions from buildings--and save 710 million tonnes oil equivalent (Mtoe) of energy by 2050.

  • Policies to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Industry--Successful Approaches and Lessons Learned: Workshop Report

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Wednesday, January 1, 2003
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    The industry sector is an important direct and indirect source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Annex I countries. Emissions from the industry sector are expected to draw increasing attention by policymakers as they look for means to reduce domestic GHG emissions. For this reason, the Annex I Expert Group (AIXG) on the UNFCCC decided to hold a workshop in Berlin on 2-3 December 2002 to discuss the range of policies to reduce GHG emissions in industry, with a focus on voluntary approaches (VAs), taxes and trading.

  • Natural Refrigerants: Sustainable Ozone- and Climate-Friendly Alternatives to HCFCs

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Monday, January 7, 2008
    Objective: 

    The handbook contains 31 articles by individual authors covering the following issues: policies and legislation on F-gases and related issues (Part 1), safety concerns and means to overcome (Part 2), a technical assessment of natural refrigerants in different applications (air conditioning, commercial and industrial refrigeration and heat pumps) (Part 3) and case studies by manufacturers and end-users providing insights into market developments and examples of successful conversions to natural refrigerants (Part 4).

  • Invention and Transfer of Climate Change Mitigation Technologies on a Global Scale: A Study Drawing on Patent Data

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Saturday, January 2, 2010
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    This paper uses the EPO/OECD World Patent Statistical Database (PATSTAT) to provide a quantitative description of the geographic distribution of inventions in 13 climate mitigation technologies since 1978 and their international diffusion on a global scale. Statistics suggest that innovation has mostly been driven by energy prices until 1990. Since then, environmental policies, and climate policies more recently, have accelerated the pace of innovation. Innovation is highly concentrated in three countries--Japan, Germany and the USA--which account for 60% of total innovations.

  • International Carbon Flows: Aluminium

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date: 
    Wednesday, January 5, 2011
    Objective: 
    Sectors: 

    Approximately one-third (28 per cent) of aluminium emissions cross a border embodied in commodity aluminium. Half of this trade is contained within regions, and the other half between regions. The 10 largest inter-regional flows of carbon embodied in traded aluminium and other non-ferrous metals are illustrated above, with the most significant being from the CIS (ex-Soviet Union Commonwealth of Independent States) to Europe, China to the rest of Asia and Australia to Asia.

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