Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
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The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research

Country of registration:
Acronym:
TNO
Relation to CTCN:
Consortium Partner
Knowledge Partner
CTCN Keyword Matches:
Sector(s) of expertise

TNO is an independent research organisation which connects people and knowledge to create innovations that boost the competitive strength of industry and the well-being of society in a sustainable way. This is our mission and it is what drives us, the over 3,400 professionals at TNO, in our work every day. We work in collaboration with partners and focus on nine domains.

Organisation name (local):
Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland
Acronym (local):
TNO
Active in:
Worldwide

    Contributions

    • Introduction to Climate Technologies for Mitigation: The role of climate technologies in reducing greenhouse gas emissions across sectors

      Type: 
      Webinar
      Date and time:
      Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - Wednesday, April 8, 2015 Europe/Copenhagen

      What can climate technologies do across all sectors to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change?  Welcome to our fifth webinar in our new series. Join our CTCN Consortium Partner Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) for this introductory webinar on climate technologies for mitigation. 

    • Small-scale Combined Heat and power

      Type: 
      Technology
      Objective:

      Co-generation is the combined production of useful thermal energy and electricity (Combined Heat and Power, CHP) from the same primary fuel. CHP can take on many forms and encompasses a range of technologies, but will always be based upon an efficient, integrated system that combines electricity production and heat recovery. By using the heat output from the electricity production for heating or industrial applications, CHP plants generally convert 75-80% of the fuel source into useful energy, while the most modern CHP plants reach efficiencies of 90% or more (IPCC, 2007).

    • Large-scale Combined Heat and Power

      Type: 
      Technology
      Objective:

      Co-generation is the combined production of useful thermal energy and electricity (Combined Heat and Power, CHP) from the same primary fuel. CHP can take on many forms and encompass a range of technologies, but will always be based upon an efficient, integrated system that combines electricity production and heat recovery. By using the heat output from the electricity production for heating or industrial applications, CHP plants generally convert 75-80% of the fuel source into useful energy, while the most modern CHP plants reach efficiencies of 90% or more (IPCC, 2007).

    • Smart grid

      Type: 
      Technology
      Objective:

      The smart grid is the state-­‐of-­‐the-­‐art technology for electrical system that can sensibly execute the operations to all interconnected elements -­‐ from generator to consumers. Smart grid simply converts the conventional power grid towards the modern grid in order to regulate sustainable, economic and reliable electricity (Massoud &Wollenberg, 2005 and Gellings, 2009). Smart grid intelligently executes operations from primary and secondary generators through the transmission and distribution network to the different types of consumers.

    • Heating- Ventilation and Air Conditioning

      Type: 
      Technology
      Objective:

      Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems supply fresh air and condition the indoor air temperature and humidity of a building. HVAC is reported as the key energy user (37%) in US buildings (WBCSD, 2008), accounting for 59% of the energy used in China commercial buildings in 2000 (Levine et al., 2007). Therefore, HVAC is a key component of climate change mitigation potential in the building sector.

    • Efficient air conditioning systems

      Type: 
      Technology
      Objective:

      Cooling is becoming a rapidly emerging demand in developing countries, which signifies that the building design and shell measures need to reduce cooling loads, and the efficiency of air-conditioning will need to be improved. Air conditioning systems are implemented in numerous sectors, namely buildings, industry and transport. They are distinguished in two main categories, room air conditioners and central air conditioners.

    • Energy efficient refrigerators

      Type: 
      Technology
      Objective:

      Refrigerators are used in households across the world to store food at a temperature of about 3 to 5 °C (37 to 41 °F) in order prevent it from spoiling. This technology description focuses on refrigerators for residential use and on energy efficiency performance only. It does not take into account potential GHG effects caused by the refrigerant.

    • Energy Savings in buildings

      Type: 
      Technology
      Objective:

      Technologies and measures which are aimed at reducing the use of energy in buildings could have several advantages, such as lower energy bills, increasing comfort of living or working, and reduced impact on the environment, including reduction of CO2 emissions. The options considered for energy savings particularly leading to CO2 emission reductions include the following: