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Glass production

Glass production

  • Introduction to Waste Management and Climate Change

    Type: 
    Webinar
    Date and time:
    Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - Wednesday, February 4, 2015 Europe/Paris

    This webinar highlights the relevance of the waste sector to climate change, provides different technology options, and ways to overcome common barriers faced by developing countries when adopting these waste management technologies.

  • Product component and materials recycling

    Type: 
    Technology
    Sectors:
    Objective:

    According to the EC (19 November, 2008) “waste means any substance or object which the holder discards or intends or is required to discard.” Recycling materials and products – that are considered waste - is an ancient practice which shows that in times of resource scarcity (i.e. shortage of virgin materials) societies attach more economic and societal value to their own waste. This implies that throughout time the definition of waste can change as well. Generally speaking longer use or re-use of materials and products this is often mainly to cover a society’s needs.

  • Biobased Functional Resins and Thermoset Materials with Excellent Mechanical Properties

    Type: 
    Product

    The use of bio-based products is not new. Industrial leaders from the past (George Washington Carver Henry Ford) promoted the use of agricultural products in manufacturing. Historically however petroleum-based chemicals proved less expensive to produce and bio-based feedstocks were not advanced. With the skyrocketing cost of oil however and with the world’s dependence on non-renewable resources and growing environmental concerns bio-based components are becoming very attractive.

  • Biodegradable Plastics with High Glass Transition Temperatures Replace PET and Polystyrene

    Type: 
    Product
    Technology:

    Beginning around 1995 the inventor took an interest in finding ways to make polymers from natural resources since it was apparent that petroleum-based polymers would eventually increase markedly in cost as the world reserves of petroleum diminished. An associate suggested they research making polymers from hydroxyl acids. This led to the idea of making polymers from lactic acid raw materials - the resultant polymers would be biodegradable. Years of experiments have resulted in novel biodegradable polymers with excellent material properties.

  • Green Building and Renewable Energy

    Type: 
    Product
    Technology:

    Pythagoras Solar’s advanced BIPV products improve building energy efficiency generate solar power and offer architectural design benefits to increase return on investment and real estate value and advance Net-Zero Energy Buildings (NZB). By leveraging patent-pending optics high-efficiency crystalline silicon advanced materials science and simulation software the company delivers the industry’s first transparent high power density PVGUs. The first products are designed to replace curtain wall windows and skylights.

  • Environmentally Friendly Epoxy

    Type: 
    Product
    Technology:

    Background: Epoxies are thermosetting polymers formed through the combination of a resin and a hardener. They are extensively used for coatings for adhesives and as a base for composite materials. Epoxies are recognized for their versatility high tensile strength and high temperature resistance. However due to environmental and health concerns there is a growing demand for epoxies that are safer for both the user and environment. Description: Michigan State University’s technology is the formulation of an eco-friendly epoxy.

  • Nanoenergetic Materials and Uses Thereof

    Type: 
    Product
    Technology:

    This invention involves applications of the released energy from the self propagation of combustion of nanosynthesized thermites. One area of application is in the semiconductor industry for example in the crystallization of amorphous materials such as amorphous silicon thin film doping of various semiconductor materials and the formation of exotic alloys. Nano synthesized thermites also called MIC produces a shock wave and localized heat which can be used to enhance the process of crystallization.