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Artificial reefs

Artificial reefs

  • Options for Ecosystem-based Adaptation in Coastal Environments

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    This guide is about taking account of, and managing, ecosystems to help people adapt to climate change in coastal areas: coastal Ecosystem based Adaptation (EBA). Vital to human wellbeing, adaptation to climate change is increasingly important in international policy discussions such as the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), which have acknowledged the potential importance of EBA in meeting this challenge.

  • Artificial Reefs and their Placement

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    Artificial Reefs and their Placement

    People are destroying coral reefs at an unprecedented rate. One part of a solution could be for the community to build artificial reefs. People are destroying coral reefs at an unprecedented rate. One part of a solution could be for the community to build artificial reefs.

  • Artificial reefs

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    To access the full technology description, please refer to the Document link above

    Summary:

    An artificial reef is a submerged (or partly exposed to tides) structure deliberately placed on the seabed to mimic some functions of a natural reef, such as protecting, regenerating, concentrating and/or enhancing populations of living marine resources. This includes the protection and regeneration of habitats. It will serve as habitat that functions as part of the natural ecosystem while doing ‘no harm’ (FAO, 2015).

  • Future of reefs in a changing environment: an ecosystem approach to managing Caribbean coral reefs in the face of climate change: Barbados country profile

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    This report provides a summary of governance and livelihoods research conducted as part of the Future of Reefs in a Changing Environment (FORCE) project.

    In this country report for Barabdos, over 500 interviews and surveys were completed as part of this study, including interviews with community members, fishing and tourism resource users, recreational divers, government agents, and representatives of NGOs.

  • Innovative reef engineering for small island states

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    The specific aims of the reef engineering and enhancement project of the AWE initiative to build coastal resillience in the face of climate change were:

    1. To use an eco-engineering approach to reduce the coastal erosion and storm related salt water flooding affecting the Grenville and Telescope area in the northern section of Grenville Bay, Grenada.

    2. To restore the wave-breaking function of the degraded reefs in northern Grenville Bay and to facilitate the reestablishment of coral growth and ecological functions in the Bay.

  • Enhancing capacity for adaptation to climate change in the Caribbean - assessment of reef monitoring systems

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    In order to understand the dynamics and track the health of coral reefs as it relates to climate change, long-term monitoring is required.

    Coral reefs are highly sensitive to changes in their surroundings environment.

    Because of their response to light, temperature and sea level rise the health of coral reefs could potentially be an ideal indicator of human induced global warming and the resultant climate change.

  • The economics of worldwide coral reef degradation

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    Estimates in this report state that coral reefs provide each year nearly US$ 30 billion in net benefits in goods and services to world economies, including, tourism, fisheries and coastal protection. Yet, according to this report, coral reefs are under heavy pressure. Already, 27% is permanently lost and with current trends, a further 30% is at risk of being lost in the coming thirty years.

  • Preparing marine protected areas to survive global change: additional guidelines to address coral bleaching

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    This paper describes guidelines for marine protected area (MPA) design and management that take into account the significant global problem of coral bleaching. The author's central tenet is that MPAs should be in part chosen for coral resilience to bleaching.Despite significant coral destruction from bleaching, it is agreed that there is also significant bleaching resistance (coral colonies that don’t bleach or bleach but don’t die)and resilience (reefs where colonies bleach and partially or wholly die, but the coral community recovers) among reef systems.

  • Climate Change Adaptation and Technology: Gaps and Needs in Southeast Asia

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    According to this report, most South-East Asian countries are vulnerable to climate change risks and impacts. This report presents the specific country situations, particularly for the water, agriculture and socio-economics sectors. This is followed by a presentation of the specific gaps and needs which were identified.