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Senegal

Official Name:
Republic of Senegal

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Specialized agency
Name:
Mr. Issakha Youm
Phone:
+221 3 38 25 04 43
Emails:
iyoum2@yahoo.fr

Energy profile

Senegal (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

In 2011, Senegal’s national access to electricity was estimated at 40%, with an urban electrification rate of 70% and rural electrification of 22%. 47 MW of non-grid connected installed capacity serves isolated centres in areas away from the main grid.

Renewable energy potential

SolarSenegal is endowed with a large solar energy resource. Over most of country’s territory, the solar irradiation is above 2 000 kWh /m2/year for Global Horizontal Irradiation and above 1,800 kWh/m2/year for Direct Normal Irradiation (Ministere des Energies Renouvelables, 2011). This provides good prospects for photovoltaic solar power projects. The falling prices of photovoltaic panels and system components make solar a very attractive solution, particularly when the costs of the alternatives – imported oil products – are high.Wind EnergySenegal’s wind power potential is concentrated along the coast and in particular the section of the coast between Dakar and Saint-Louis. In a study carried out by the Senegal Meteorological Service, wind velocities of 3.7-6.1 m/s were observed in the 50 km-long coastal strip between Dakar and St. Louis.HydroSenegal has about 3 billion cubic meters per year of renewable groundwater resources, excluding those groundwater resources that overlap with surface water. Total water withdrawals in 1987 were 1.4 billion cubic meters, of which 92% is for agriculture, 3% for industry and 5% for domestic use. The Senegal River represents a significant hydroelectric potential estimated at 1,200 MW and partially exploited at Manantali plant (200 MW) commissioned in 2002, providing electricity to Senegal, Mali and Mauritania via a 225 KV interconnection line.Biomass and BiofuelSolid biomass (agricultural and agribusiness by-products) and liquid biofuels also have potential in parts of the country. As mentioned earlier, biomass is the dominant source of energy in Senegal providing more than 50% of the national energy balance. Biomass resources, such as agricultural by-products (approximately 3.3 million dry tons of agricultural residues) agribusiness (rice husk, bagasse, peanut shells, cotton stalks, etc.), also have the potential for grid-distributed and off-grid electricity generation (Ibid). Plant species (plant oil, jatropha curcas, cat-tails, sunflower, cotton, castor, sweet sorghum etc.) also have potential for biofuel production.

Energy framework

Letter of Development Policy for the Energy SectorIn October 2012, the GoS adopted a Letter of Development Policy for the Energy Sector. The Letter of Development Policy outlines the sector policy objectives of the newly elected government to improve the sector’s performance in the medium term. The main axes of the Letter of Development Policy for the Energy Sector are: (a) ensuring energy security and increasing the energy access for all; (b) developing a policy mix combining thermal generation, bio-energy, coal, gas, and renewables and seizing the opportunities of regional interconnections; (c) continuing and accelerating the liberalization of the energy sector by encouraging independent production and institutional reform of the sector; (d) improving the competitiveness of the sector in order to lower the cost of energy and reduce sector subsidies; and (e) strengthening regulation of the sector.The 2013-2017 plan for developing production facilities is based on an energy policy mix combining coal, natural gas, hydroelectricity, and renewable energies. In addition to the rehabilitation of SENELEC’s production facilities, which are in progress, this plan makes provision for the following additional capacities: the Félou hydroelectric power station of 15 MW in 2013, an IPP in the amount of 150 MW (liquefied natural gas) in April 2014, the IPP Tobéne (Taiba Ndiaye) of 70 MW in 2014, a coal-fired IPP (Sendou) of 125 MW in April 2015; an import of 80 MW from the natural gas powered plant in Mauritania in October 2015; a coal-fired IPP with Kepco of 250 MW between 2016 and 2017, and renewable energy projects. A standing inter-ministerial committee for monitoring energy projects has been instituted. The coming on stream of these new units will be accompanied, at current oil prices, by the phase-out of the electricity subsidy and will lead over time to lower costs for the user.To react to the power crisis, in 2010, the GoS carried out a diagnostic exercise of the sector, which highlighted an increasing gap between fast growing demand and insufficient, costly, and unreliable supply of electricity, as well as SENELEC’s persistent financial difficulties, characterized by a significant operating deficit and high indebtedness. To tackle both technical and financial imbalances, the GoS developed a 2011 – 2015 electricity emergency plan, outlining the overall policy framework and strategy to steer the sector towards a sustainable path and ensure SENELEC’s financial and operational sustainability over the long run.The GoS also set up a special fund to support fuel provision for electricity generation (the Special Fund for Energy – FSE). The FSE became operational in July 2011 and it finances fuel supplies to SENELEC and co-finances investments in new infrastructure, particularly generation expansion. The Fund’s revenues are financed through GoS budgetary transfers (including tariff compensation), charges on oil products, energy and telecommunications, and a contribution from SENELEC. 

Source
Static Source:
  • Energy, climate change and poverty alleviation - policy paper

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:

    The papers from three of GNESD’s Member centres examine different aspects of the complex links between climate change, energy and poverty, to help clarify the debate and to demonstrate that the issues, while complex, are nonetheless perfectly manageable. The most salient finding of the studies is that energy, in spite of its pivotal role for sustainable development and for successful adaptation, is hardly mentioned in the adaptation plans prepared by developing countries under the UNFCCC’s National Adaptation Programmes of Action (NAPA) process.

  • The value of indigenous knowledge in climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies in the African Sahel

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    It is increasingly realised that mitigation and adaptation should not be pursued independently of each other but as complements. Integrating mitigation and adaptation into climate change concerns is not a completely new idea in the African Sahel where the local populations in this region, through their indigenous knowledge systems, have developed and implemented extensive mitigation and adaptation strategies that have enabled them to reduce their vulnerability to past climate variability and change.

  • The CDM project potential in sub-Saharan Africa

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This report assesses opportunities and challenges for the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) in sub-Saharan African countries, namely Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic Congo (DRC), Ethiopia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. It analyses the technical potentials for CDM projects per sector as well as a review of the Kyoto infrastructure and an evaluation of Grid Emissions Factors.

  • Senegal: Role of Women in a Model of Community Management of Fish Resources and Marine Environments, Cayar

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    In most cases, women are not involved in the planning, development or management of marine and coastal resources. Integrating women's and men's usage of these resources into the establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs) increases the chance of both women and men participating in and benefiting from the MPA. This case study highlights the attempt to fully involve women in fisheries and coastal resource management in Cayar, Senegal - at the onset, women and men in the community were both involved in the participatory process of establishing the MPA.

  • Gender Primer of Trade and Investment Policies

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:
    Approach:

    What are the policy measures put in place by governments to regulate international trade, and how do they relate to gender roles and relationships? This primer firstly makes the case for looking at gender in the context of trade, arguing that trade has different impacts on men and women, and that men and women respond differently to trade policies. It then looks at a number of key policy measures including: tariffs, quotas, subsidies, exchange rates, capital controls/investment limitations, investment incentives, intellectual property and non-tariff barriers.

  • CO2 utilization in the perspective of industrial ecology, an overview

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Carbon dioxide emissions from anthropic activities have accumulated in the atmosphere in excess of 800 Gigatons since preindustrial times, and are continuously increasing. Among other strategies, CO2 capture and storage is one option to mitigate the emissions from large point sources. In addition, carbon dioxide extraction from ambient air is assessed to reduce the atmospheric concentration of CO2. Both direct and indirect (through photosynthesis) pathways are possible.

  • Benchmarking for Performance Assessment of Small and Large Irrigation Schemes Along the Senegal Valley in Mauritania

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This analysis of 17 small and 3 large irrigation schemes located along the River Senegal attempts to establish benchmarks for both productivity and performance of irrigation schemes along the valley, and to inquire whether small schemes function better than large schemes.The analysis of the indicators revealed that, on average, large schemes performed similarly to small-scale schemes, but small schemes were more variable, particularly in input-use efficiency.

  • Capacity Building hub for Sustainable Energy

    Type: 
    Publication
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    The capacity building hub collaborates with global stakeholders and institutions across the energy value chain, and leverages their mutual strengths to foster attainment of the ambitious goals. The hub undertakes a demand-driven approach to catalyze change. It is a special-purpose vehicle that facilitates - awareness generation/sensitization, knowledge assimilation and dissemination, design and delivery of programmes of change, and identification of research gaps.

  • Lighting a Billion Lives

    Type: 
    Publication
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    Lighting a Billion Lives is a global initiative to facilitate clean energy access and the delivery of last mile energy services for basic and productive use. The initiative enables energy poor communities to transition from traditional and inefficient energy sources to modern, more efficient and sustainable energy solutions. The initiative accelerates market development for clean energy technologies through knowledge sharing, capacity building and market seeding.

  • GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment)

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment) is a rating tool that helps people assesses the performance of their building against certain nationally acceptable benchmarks. It evaluates the environmental performance of a building holistically over its entire life cycle, thereby providing a definitive standard for what constitutes a ‘green building’. The rating system, based on accepted energy and environmental principles, seeks to strike a balance between the established practices and emerging concepts, both national and international.