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Nigeria

Official Name:
Federal Republic of Nigeria

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Mr. Chukwuemeka Okebugwu
Phone:
+234 80 6442 6144
Emails:
chuksokebugwu@yahoo.com

Energy profile

Nigeria (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Only about 40% of the households in Nigeria have access to the public utility supply and only 46% have access to electricity.  Only 2% of the rural households in Nigeria have access to electricity either by rural electrification actions initiated by the government or self-generation by private individuals (Y.S. Mohammed et al, 2013)

Renewable energy potential

Solar

Nigeria lies within a high sunshine belt and thus has enormous solar energy potentials. Solar radiation is fairly well distributed with average solar radiation of about 19.8 MJm –2 day-1 and average sunshine hours of 6hrs per day. If solar collectors or modules were used to cover 1% of Nigeria’s land area, it is possible to generate 1850 x103 GWh of solar electricity per year; this is over one hundred times the current grid electricity consumption level in the country.

Wind Energy

Wind energy is available at annual average speeds of about 2.0 m/s at the coastal region and 4.0 m/s at the far northern region of the country. With an air density of 1.1 kg/m3, the wind energy intensity perpendicular to the wind direction ranges between 4.4 W/ m2 at the coastal areas and 35.2 W/ m2 at the far northern region.

Biomass & Biogas

The biomass resources of Nigeria can be identified as crops, forage grasses and shrubs, animal wastes and waste arising from forestry, agriculture, municipal and industrial activities, as well as, aquatic biomass. Crops such Sweet sorghum, maize, Sugarcane were the most promising feedstock for biofuel production. It has been estimated that Nigeria produces about 227,500 tons of fresh animal waste daily. Since 1 kg of fresh animal waste produces about 0.03 m3 biogas, then Nigeria can potentially produce about 6.8 million m3 of biogas every day from animal waste only. Although biogas technology is not common in Nigeria, various research works on the technology and policy aspects of biogas production has been carried by various scientists in the country.

Hydro

The country is reasonably endowed with large rivers and some few natural falls. Small rivers and streams also exist within the present split of the country into eleven River Basin Authorities, some of which maintain minimum discharges all the year round. In a study carried out in twelve states and four  river basins, over 278 unexploited small hydropower (SHP) sites with total potentials of 734.3 MW were identified. However, SHP potential sites exist in virtually all parts of Nigeria with an estimated total capacity of 3,500 MW. They indicate that Nigeria possesses potential renewable source of energy along her numerous river systems, a total of 70 micro dams, 126 mini dam and 86 small sites have been identified.The total technically exploitable hydropower potential based on the country’s river system is conservatively estimated to be about 11,000 MW of which only 19% is currently being tapped or developed. These rivers, waterfalls and streams with high potentials for hydropower, if properly harnessed will lead to decentralized use and provide the most affordable and accessible option to off-grid electricity services especially to the rural communities.

Energy framework

The development of RE technologies in Nigeria has been slow. New measures are aimed to boost growth in the RE sector (legislative framework, licensing arrangements for private-sector operators, Feed-in Tariffs and clarifying market rules for RE services and products). Rural electrification programs are to take RE sources into full account. Liberalization has led to private sector participation in the generation sector, and a number of operational IPPs in the country today. Establishment of off-grid generation/distribution plants is encouraged. Means include:

  • moratorium on import duties for renewable energy technologies
  • design of further tax credits, capital incentives and preferential loan opportunities for renewable energy projects
  • Feed-in Tariffs for solar energy, wind power and small-hydro (under development)

Renewable Energy Master Plan (REMP)

The country’s Renewable Energy Master Plan was launched in 2006 and identifies considerable potential for generating solar, small and large hydro, biomass, biogas and wind energy across the country.Gradual movement from a fossil economy to one driven by an increasing share of renewable energy. Targets for renewable energy technologies by 2025:

  • Small-hydro: (600 MW in 2015) 2,000 MW
  • Solar PV: 500 MW
  • Biomass-based power plants: (50 MW in 2015) 400 MW
  • Wind: 40 MW
  • Electrification: (2005 level 42%, 60% in2015) 75%

National Integrated Power Project (NIPP)

Nigeria plans to increase generation from fossil fuel sources to more than 20,000 MW by 2020. The Nigerian government has set several targets to increase power generation over the past decade, but none of these targets have been met. The NIPP was initially established in 2004 by the Nigerian government as a plan to construct multiple natural gas-fired power plants using natural gas that was flared. Although progress has been slower than initially expected, some of the power plants are expected to come online in the short term. According to the August 2013 Roadmap, NIPP projects currently contribute more than 1,000 MW to the national grid capacity, and it is expected to reach 4,771 MW in 2015 when all planned units are expected to be completed and commissioned. A major source of capacity expansions is expected to come from Independent Power Projects (IPPs). IPPs currently contribute around 1,674 MW to the national grid capacity, and capacity from IPPs is expected to grow to about 14,000 MW by 2020, according to the August 2013 Roadmap. IPPs include power plants operated by IOCs.Nigeria plans to increase hydroelectricity generation capacity to 5,690 MW by 2020, quadrupling the capacity from the 2012 level. The country plans to increase hydroelectricity generation by upgrading current hydroelectricity plants and constructing new plants: Gurara II (360 MW), Zungeru (700 MW) and Mambilla (3,050 MW). In late 2013, the Nigerian government announced a $1.3 billion deal with China to build the 700-MW Zungeru hydropower project. The Export-Import Bank of China will cover 75% of the cost, while the Nigerian government will finance the remaining cost.

Energising Access to Sustainable Energy (EASE)

The programme aims to improve the enabling framework conditions for renewable energy and energy efficiency in Nigeria and, in particular, with a focus on the use of renewable energies by Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and households.The EASE programme will also address the massive deforestation and cutting of trees for fuel wood, which is the main energy source for the majority of the population, by planting more trees. Furthermore, Nigeria is the second largest gas flaring country, emitting some 40 million tons of CO2 each day. Through the promotion of reduced gas flaring, the EASE programme will contribute to resource conservation and help fight climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Some other activities to be carried out through the programme will include: design of energy assessment and strategies to increase access to energy, providing essential training on aspects such as norms, standards, and tariffs, or the development of business plans to demonstrate commercial viability of small-scale gas resources. The new programme will be run in partnership with the World Bank (which will contribute with over €4.6 million) and the GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit) (with a contribution of €9 million).

Source
Static Source:
  • Beyond Fire: How to Achieve Sustainable Cooking

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    This report provides an overview of the main technological pathways to fundamentally transform the cooking sector in developing countries to sustainable sources. It provides an analysis of the main technological options and an estimate of their costs and feasibility.

  • Linking Heat and Electricity Systems: Co-generation and District Heating and Cooling Solutions for a Clean Energy Future

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This report highlights two underutilized but fully implementable technologies that efficiently integrate heat and electricity systems, provide flexibility and enhance energy security. It examines what restricts co‑generation and efficient district heating and cooling systems that can help de-carbonize the energy system.

  • Beyond Fire: How to Achieve Sustainable Cooking

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Approach:

    This report provides an overview of the main technological pathways to fundamentally transform the cooking sector in developing countries to sustainable sources. It provides an analysis of the main technological options and an estimate of their costs and feasibility.

  • SMARTer2030 - ICT Solutions for 21st Century Challenges

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    SMARTer2030 is the third instalment in the acclaimed GeSI series of SMART reports, demonstrating the enabling potential of ICT in eight different sectors (from buildings to energy, from transport to agriculture and healthcare), and how ICT solutions can support the transition to a low-carbon economy while delivering business opportunities and improving people's quality of life.

  • SystemTransformation - How Digital Solutions Will Drive Progress Towards the Sustainable Development Goals

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Building on the findings of the GeSI SMARTer2030 report, #SystemTransformation looks at how ICT will be instrumental in the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The report analyzes the current SDGs implementation gaps, identifies the key features that make ICT a fundamental tool to achieve the Goals, and provides a deep-dive into those Goals where the ICT contribution can be most immediate and important.

  • Adaptation Planning with Communities: Practitioner Brief 1

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    The brief provides a conceptual overview of ALP's Community Adaptation Action Planning (CAAP) process, as well as explanations and examples of how it works in practice, based on ALP experiences in Ghana and Niger. It describes how to progress from climate vulnerability and capacity assessments in a participatory community planning process. ALP community plans focused on livelihoods and natural resource issues, but the CAAP process described applies for addressing all climate sensitive sectors, for example health, education, energy, or social safety nets.

  • InnoVentum AB

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Knowledge partner
    Country of registration:
    Sweden
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Knowledge Partner
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    The mission of InnoVentum is to bring Power to the People. Innoventum has developed and commercialised a range of environmentally friendly renewable energy solutions: small wind and solar installations as well as hybrid wind-solar stations. The 12 m towers of Innoventum are made of wood and can be easily installed without a crane. Innoventum has experience in configuring and installing renewable energy mini-grids with battery and diesel backup.

  • FOKABS INC.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    FOKABS’ mission is to contribute towards climate-resilient and low-carbon development solutions. The company provides advisory services on climate change, especially in developing countries. FOKABS offers services in capacity building, project development, climate finance and international negotiations in the areas of nationally determined contributions (NDC), national adaptation plans (NAP), reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), CDM, and NAMA.

  • Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology Research

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Spain
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    The Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology Research (Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas - CIEMAT) is a public research organization focused on energy and environment and the technologies related to them. The CIEMAT main lines of action are the study, development, promotion and optimization of various sources as renewable energies, study of their impact on the environment, development of new technologies; not forgetting areas of basic research such as high-energy physics and molecular and cellular biology.

  • 3WAYSTE

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    France
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    3Wayste® is an innovative, patented waste management system capable of treating 100 per cent of municipal solid waste (MSW) while profitably revalorizing more than 90 per cent for clean energy fuel, pure compost and raw materials. The unprecedented level of revalorization means less landfills, less incinerators and less greenhouse gas emissions.