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Malawi

Official Name:
Republic of Malawi

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Name:
Mr. Lyson Kampira
Position:
Chief Research Services Officer
Phone:
+265 1 771 550, +265 999 916 036
Emails:
lkampira@ncst.mw, lkampira@yahoo.com

Energy profile

Malawi (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

Only 8% of the Malawian population currently benefit from a grid-connected electricity supply.  Moreover, the national grid almost exclusively serves urban and peri-urban areas – around 25% of urban households have electricity, compared to 1% of rural households.  As such, the 85% of Malawians that live in rural areas are not served by grid-connected electricity and the great majority of the rural population is unlikely to be grid-connected in the near future, even with national grid extension programmes such as The Malawi Rural Electrification Project (MAREP).

Renewable energy potential

With large lakeshore area with Mwera winds, Malawi has exceptional wind resources. Researchers have found that Malawi could meet all their electricity demands from wind power through 2030. Construction of the first wind farm in Malawi will start early 2010 at Chilunguzi Farm; Mwasinja Village, Dedza. The wind farm is scheduled to be completed by end of 2010.Solar Cookers International has ranked Malawi as 20th in the world for solar cooking potential. The estimated number of people in Malawi with fuel scarcity in 2020 is 2,700,000. In 2009, a small-scale underground biogas plant has been established by the Test & Training Centre in Renewable Energy Technologies (TCRET) at Mzuzu University, one of the public universities in Malawi. By the end of the project in 2011 there were 12 biogas digesters installed. 

Energy framework

The Malawi Growth and Development Strategy 2006-2011 (MGDS) set out the government’s economic growth and development priorities for five years. The MGDS identified energy, along with five other key priority areas, as a crucial input for industrial processing. The government recognizes that the power sector is a key constraint to Malawi’s economic growth. The objective of the MGDS was to reduce the number and duration of blackouts, increase access to reliable and affordable electricity in rural areas and other targeted areas, and improve coordination between the needs for energy for households and those of other high growth sectors such as tourism and mining. The second MGDS 2 (2011-2016) is not yet published.In addition to the MGDS, a National Energy Policy (NEP) was approved in 2003 and is the responsibility of the Department of Energy Affairs (DoEA).  The policy resulted in the formation of the Malawi Energy Regulatory Authority (MERA) and was influential in a recent restructuring of the The Electricity Supply Corporation of Malawi (ESCOM), while continuing to guide energy development within the country.As part of the NEP, a Renewable Energy Framework has been in development for some time. This will also be the responsibility of the DoEA and will bring more coherence to renewable energy developments particularly at the national, grid-level, scale but also with some focus on the local, off-grid, scale.At the international level, Malawi is a signatory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which requires the government to report on greenhouse gas emissions and other vulnerabilities.  As part of their involvement with the UNFCCC, the Malawian Government developed a Technology Needs Assessment report in 2003 .  In the absence of other formally approved government policies, strategies or plans for renewable development, this document provides a reasonable overview of the government’s strategies and requirements with regards to renewables.In an attempt to minimize the use of biomass fuels the government undertook a number of initiatives including the Program for Biomass Energy Conservation (ProBEC) which seeks to promote the use of clay stoves to save fuel; the Promotion of Alternative Energy Sources Project (PAESP) which seeks to promote non-traditional fuels for cooking and heating to reduce environmental degradation; and a National Sustainable and Renewable Energy Programme (NSREP)  which promotes renewable energy technologies in Malawi. The Malawi Rural Electrification Project (MAREP) has also been established.The Rural Electrification Bill (2004) deals with all aspects of renewable energy systems. 

Source
Static Source:
  • Beyond Fire: How to Achieve Sustainable Cooking

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    This report provides an overview of the main technological pathways to fundamentally transform the cooking sector in developing countries to sustainable sources. It provides an analysis of the main technological options and an estimate of their costs and feasibility.

  • Linking Heat and Electricity Systems: Co-generation and District Heating and Cooling Solutions for a Clean Energy Future

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This report highlights two underutilized but fully implementable technologies that efficiently integrate heat and electricity systems, provide flexibility and enhance energy security. It examines what restricts co‑generation and efficient district heating and cooling systems that can help de-carbonize the energy system.

  • Beyond Fire: How to Achieve Sustainable Cooking

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Approach:

    This report provides an overview of the main technological pathways to fundamentally transform the cooking sector in developing countries to sustainable sources. It provides an analysis of the main technological options and an estimate of their costs and feasibility.

  • SMARTer2030 - ICT Solutions for 21st Century Challenges

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    SMARTer2030 is the third instalment in the acclaimed GeSI series of SMART reports, demonstrating the enabling potential of ICT in eight different sectors (from buildings to energy, from transport to agriculture and healthcare), and how ICT solutions can support the transition to a low-carbon economy while delivering business opportunities and improving people's quality of life.

  • SystemTransformation - How Digital Solutions Will Drive Progress Towards the Sustainable Development Goals

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Building on the findings of the GeSI SMARTer2030 report, #SystemTransformation looks at how ICT will be instrumental in the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The report analyzes the current SDGs implementation gaps, identifies the key features that make ICT a fundamental tool to achieve the Goals, and provides a deep-dive into those Goals where the ICT contribution can be most immediate and important.

  • Adaptation Planning with Communities: Practitioner Brief 1

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    The brief provides a conceptual overview of ALP's Community Adaptation Action Planning (CAAP) process, as well as explanations and examples of how it works in practice, based on ALP experiences in Ghana and Niger. It describes how to progress from climate vulnerability and capacity assessments in a participatory community planning process. ALP community plans focused on livelihoods and natural resource issues, but the CAAP process described applies for addressing all climate sensitive sectors, for example health, education, energy, or social safety nets.

  • FOKABS INC.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    FOKABS’ mission is to contribute towards climate-resilient and low-carbon development solutions. The company provides advisory services on climate change, especially in developing countries. FOKABS offers services in capacity building, project development, climate finance and international negotiations in the areas of nationally determined contributions (NDC), national adaptation plans (NAP), reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), CDM, and NAMA.

  • IFDC Perspectives

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Perspectives is a biannual publication of the International Fertilizer
    Development Center (IFDC). Unless otherwise noted, printed material
    published in Perspectives is in the public domain and may be freely
    reproduced. Source acknowledgment and a copy of any reproduction are
    requested. Electronic versions in English and French are available at ifdc.org.

  • IFDC Magazine Volume 40 No 4

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    The IFDC Magazine is a quarterly publication of the International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC). Unless otherwise noted, printed material published in the IFDC Magazine is in the public domain and may be freely reproduced. Source acknowledgment and a copy of any reproduction are requested. Electronic versions in English and French are available at ifdc.org.

  • IFDC Magazine Volume 40 Nov 3

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    The IFDC Magazine is a quarterly publication of the International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC). Unless otherwise noted, printed material published in the IFDC Magazine is in the public domain and may be freely reproduced. Source acknowledgment and a copy of any reproduction are requested. Electronic versions in English and French are available at ifdc.org.