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Kenya

Official Name:
Republic of Kenya

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Research and academic institution
Name:
Mr. Kelvin Khisa
Position:
Head, Environment Division
Phone:
+254 20 6003842
Emails:
kelvinnamukhasi@gmail.com kelvin.khisa@kirdi.go.ke

Energy profile

Kenya (2014)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

As of 2010, Kenya had an overall national electrification rate of 23%, with rural energy access to the grid about 5% and urban access at 50%.The Kenyan Government is working to rapidly increase electrification rates in both urban and rural areas. As part of its national Vision 2030—to create a globally competitive and prosperous nation with a high quality of life by 2030— Kenya aims to grow rural electricity access to 20% by 2012 and 40% by 2024.

Renewable energy potential

SolarSolar energy can be used for lighting bulbs, heating houses and water, drying and generating electricity. Kenya location astride the equator gives it a unique opportunity to invest in solar energy as it experiences solar radiations of 4-6kwh/m2/day and around 6 hours of strong sunlight (National energy policy, 2012). To get the amount of energy or the number of solar panels one would need the calculation below can be used: in Kenya where there is 5.6 hours of sun/day a 80W solar panel would produce=450Wh/day  (Kilonzo, 2013):Wind EnergyKenya Aeolus Wind — 60 MW: The Government of Kenya, project financiers, and Aeolus Kenya Ltd. are closing agreements for the funding and construction of the Kinangop Wind Park. Power Africa also supports the implementation of a grid management program to assist Kenya in managing integration of intermittent renewable energy. The installed wind energy capacity to the grid was 5.45 MW as at June, 2012. Exploitation of wind energy resource in Kenya has however been hampered by high capital cost and lack of sufficient wind regime data among other factors.Biomass & biogasGeothermal resources in Kenya have an estimated potential of between 7,000 MWe to 10,000 MWe spread over 14 prospective sites in the Rift Valley.HydroSmall hydro potential is estimated at 3,000 MW of which it is estimated that less than 30 MW have been exploited and only 15.3 MW supply the national grid.www.ieakenya.or.ke/.../doc.../284-energy-in-kenyaGeothermalKenya’s Draft Energy Policy 2012 estimates geothermal potential within the Great Rift Valley at between 7,000 MW and 10,000 MW. The GDC, a state-owned Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) established for the development of geothermal resources in Kenya, recently invited bids for the development of 90 MW of geothermal power in the Menengai field within the Rift Valley by 2014. In addition to supporting the GDC, the GoK is also expected to create a Directorate to oversee renewable energy policy and a Renewable Energy Lead Agency to undertake the promotion of this resource, with a target 5,000 MW of geothermal power expected by 2030.

Energy framework

The Energy Policy and Act: Kenya’s energy policy of 2004 encourages implementation of indigenous renewable energy sources to enhance the country’s electricity supply capacity. The policy is implemented through the Energy Act of 2006, which provides for mitigation of climate change, through energy efficiency and promotion of renewable energy. In addition, the Feed in Tariffs (FiTs) policy of 2008 (revised 2012) promotes generation of electricity from renewable sources. It applies to geothermal, wind, small hydro, solar and biomass.Kenya’s Updated Least Cost Power Development Plan 2011-2030 (LCPDP).  The government of Kenya (GoK) identifies nine projects as key pillars to the successful implementation of Vision 2030. These are expected to push the country’s energy requirements by about 890 MW, with highest demand expected from the Konza City ICT Park (440 MW) and Meru’s iron and steel smelting industry (315 MW).  The LCPDP is the Ministry of Energy (MoE’s) power implementation plan for delivering the power sector targets outlined in Vision 2030.Under the LCPDP, Kenya’s generation capacity is projected to increase to 19,220 MW by 2030, with geothermal contributing a quarter of  Kenya’s total installed capacity and hydro power dropping ten-fold to about 5 percent. The plan also highlights nuclear power as a potential power source, with an inaugural 1,000 MW plant planned for 2022. Commissioning of subsequent nuclear plants is expected to increase nuclear power generation to 3,000 MW by 2030.KPLC’s Updated Retail Tariff Application on 7 February 2013 (the Tariff Application) also identifies an additional 851 MW of generation capacity expected to be developed by independent power producers (IPPs) (private companies which generate and sell electricity). IPPs account for about 26% of the Kenya’s installed capacity thereby bridging the demand gap.

Source
Static Source:
  • Beyond Fire: How to Achieve Sustainable Cooking

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    This report provides an overview of the main technological pathways to fundamentally transform the cooking sector in developing countries to sustainable sources. It provides an analysis of the main technological options and an estimate of their costs and feasibility.

  • Linking Heat and Electricity Systems: Co-generation and District Heating and Cooling Solutions for a Clean Energy Future

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    This report highlights two underutilized but fully implementable technologies that efficiently integrate heat and electricity systems, provide flexibility and enhance energy security. It examines what restricts co‑generation and efficient district heating and cooling systems that can help de-carbonize the energy system.

  • Beyond Fire: How to Achieve Sustainable Cooking

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Approach:

    This report provides an overview of the main technological pathways to fundamentally transform the cooking sector in developing countries to sustainable sources. It provides an analysis of the main technological options and an estimate of their costs and feasibility.

  • SMARTer2030 - ICT Solutions for 21st Century Challenges

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    SMARTer2030 is the third instalment in the acclaimed GeSI series of SMART reports, demonstrating the enabling potential of ICT in eight different sectors (from buildings to energy, from transport to agriculture and healthcare), and how ICT solutions can support the transition to a low-carbon economy while delivering business opportunities and improving people's quality of life.

  • SystemTransformation - How Digital Solutions Will Drive Progress Towards the Sustainable Development Goals

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Building on the findings of the GeSI SMARTer2030 report, #SystemTransformation looks at how ICT will be instrumental in the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The report analyzes the current SDGs implementation gaps, identifies the key features that make ICT a fundamental tool to achieve the Goals, and provides a deep-dive into those Goals where the ICT contribution can be most immediate and important.

  • Adaptation Planning with Communities: Practitioner Brief 1

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    The brief provides a conceptual overview of ALP's Community Adaptation Action Planning (CAAP) process, as well as explanations and examples of how it works in practice, based on ALP experiences in Ghana and Niger. It describes how to progress from climate vulnerability and capacity assessments in a participatory community planning process. ALP community plans focused on livelihoods and natural resource issues, but the CAAP process described applies for addressing all climate sensitive sectors, for example health, education, energy, or social safety nets.

  • FOKABS INC.

    Type: 
    Organisation
    Country of registration:
    Canada
    Relation to CTCN:
    Network Member
    Sector(s) of expertise:

    FOKABS’ mission is to contribute towards climate-resilient and low-carbon development solutions. The company provides advisory services on climate change, especially in developing countries. FOKABS offers services in capacity building, project development, climate finance and international negotiations in the areas of nationally determined contributions (NDC), national adaptation plans (NAP), reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), CDM, and NAMA.

  • Private finance for climate-change adaptation: Challenges and opportunities for Kenya

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:

    This policy brief examines how Kenya can create an enabling environment for private investment in adaptation, and how development partners can support this effort.

    Private investments in adaptation are important. The costs of adaptation are too high to be met by the public sector alone, and developed countries have expressly envisioned private-sector contributions in their pledge to mobilize 100 billion USD per year by 2020 to support climate action in developing countries.

  • Solar dryer for crops

    Type: 
    Product
    Objective:
    Technology:

    This solar dryer design is based on the design of a green -house and was designed by QSM and Associates. The main difference is that the dryer is fitted with fine wire mesh on both the windward and the leeward sides at the bottom for air inlet and an opening at the top to provide for exhaustion of the vapors coming from the produce. Inside the dyer are racks fitted with fine mesh wire of food grade material to hold the produce and the floor is plastered. The standard design is seven by fifteen meters and can hold a ton of fresh produce.

  • IFDC Perspectives

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Perspectives is a biannual publication of the International Fertilizer
    Development Center (IFDC). Unless otherwise noted, printed material
    published in Perspectives is in the public domain and may be freely
    reproduced. Source acknowledgment and a copy of any reproduction are
    requested. Electronic versions in English and French are available at ifdc.org.