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Grenada

Official Name:
Grenada
Region:

National Designated Entity

Type of organisation:
Government/Ministry
Name:
Ms. Merina Jessamy
Position:
Permanent Secretary, Climate Resilience, the Environment, Forestry, Fisheries, Disaster Management and Information
Phone:
+473 440 3386 ext 26862
Emails:
mejessamy@gmail.com, merinaeduards@hotmail.com

Energy profile

Grenada (2012)

Type: 
Energy profile
Energy profile
Extent of network

National electrification rate (2008): 99.5%.

Renewable energy potential

Grenada has promoted capitalization of its natural resources by using renewables such as wind and solar energy, which according to 2006 OLADE data reached 588 thousand barrels of oil equivalent. Solar, wind and biomass are the main potential sources of renewable energy.Hydropower Possible hydropower potentials were studied in the 1980s but nothing beyond 500 kW was discovered.Solar energySolar energy is mainly used for water heaters in hospitals and residences. Since 2006, the private Grenada Solar Power GRENSOL has been marketing photovoltaic systems –with ratings up to 9 kW- and more recently entered into an agreement with GRENLEC to inject power from systems with ratings up to 20 kW into the local grid in a net-metering arrangement.Wind energyWind energy studies were conducted in the three islands of Grenada with the identification of three areas. There is an 80-kW wind power facility that became operational in March 2007 on the premises of a holiday resort in the southeast of the country.Biomass energyFire wood is used for cooking in residential and rural areas. Bagasse is used as fuel by the sugarcane industry. The yearly sugarcane bagasse production was 3800 barrels of oil equivalent. In addition, wastes from nutmeg processing have been turned into energy potential, and over the coming decade may be used as fuel in steam turbine generation plants.GeothermalGrenada’s geothermal potential is estimated at 400 MW.GRENLEC has recently indicated its interest in geothermal energy development and has submitted a proposed development strategy to the government. GRENLEC has suggested that a possible scenario would be the installation of a 20 MW geothermal plant to be operational by the last quarter of 2013, with a longer term plan to increase geothermal capacity to 40+ MW. This is a positive development that aligns with Government’s policy. The company’s capacity projections to 2015, short and long term business plans, future Annual Reports and the company’s formal documentation must now be made to reflect this stated intention if it is to be regarded and accepted by the wider public as part of GRENLEC’s intended business approach. It is also expected that GRENLEC will indicate where its priorities in renewable energy investments will be placed.Waste-to-EnergyThere is significant interest in Waste-to-Energy as an option in Grenada. GRENLEC has stated its interest in developing municipal solid waste as an alternative energy source and have conducted an analysis of the waste stream and content to inform their plans. Accordingly, their capacity projections show an addition of 1.5 MW of municipal Waste-to-Energy capacity in 2013.According to the National Energy Policy, in order to make the transition to renewable energy for domestic demand, the Government of Grenada will:- Complete Feasibility and Construct a 20 MW Geothermal Plant- Construct an Additional 20 MW Geothermal Plant- Construct a 2.5 MW Wind Turbine for Carriacou- Achieve 10% Electricity Generation by Wind & Solar PV- Establish Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Standards- Achieve 20% Market Penetration with Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

Energy framework

In 2011, the Cabinet of Grenada approved the official National Energy Policy (NEP). The formulation of the NEP started in 2009 through the technical and financial support of the OAS-EU financed project Caribbean Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP) with assistance of the Isada Consulting Group.The NEP represents a collaboration of many stakeholders in Grenada led by the Ministry of Finance, Planning, Economy, Energy and Cooperatives with input from the public at large.The Grenada National Energy Policy is the guideline and roadmap to the development of a healthy Energy Mix in Grenada and hence a step forward in resolving energy poverty which critically acts as a barrier to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).20% of all domestic energy usage (electricity and transport) will originate from renewable energy sources by 2020.

Source
Static Source:
  • CO2 utilization in the perspective of industrial ecology, an overview

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Sectors:

    Carbon dioxide emissions from anthropic activities have accumulated in the atmosphere in excess of 800 Gigatons since preindustrial times, and are continuously increasing. Among other strategies, CO2 capture and storage is one option to mitigate the emissions from large point sources. In addition, carbon dioxide extraction from ambient air is assessed to reduce the atmospheric concentration of CO2. Both direct and indirect (through photosynthesis) pathways are possible.

  • Road map on building a green economy for sustainable development in Carriacou, Petite Martinique, Grenada

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:

    Road Map on Building A Green Economy for Sustainable Development in Carriacou, Petite Martinique, Grenada.

    This study represents a first attempt to define the major changes needed to induce the transformation of the economy of Carriacou and Petite Martinique towards a greener economy that would facilitate sustainable development and enhance the well-being of the population.

  • Climate and development resources Grenada

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    Report showcasing quality documents on climate change and development for Grenada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique, as part of the project, Improving Access to Online Knowledge Resources on Climate and Development Phase 3.

    The aim is to improve knowledge-sharing on climate and development for the ti-island state covering key sectors such as water, agriculture and food security, disasters, coasts, fisheries, health, renewable energy, tourism, forests and marine environments.

  • Development of coastal erosion hazard maps: Grenada

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    Coastal beach erosion hazard maps for twenty selected bays in Grenada, with one bay, namely Grand Anse Bay mapped at high-resolution. These maps reveal the long-term trends around the coast of Grenada.

    An initial mission to the country was undertaken in order to collect necessary field data for the erosion analysis; meet the key stakeholders and to become familiar with the study area. At the initial meeting, key stakeholders agreed that the 100-year return period event and the 20-year shelf life would be the main modeling parameters for the erosion analysis. 

  • Grenada growth and poverty reduction strategy 2012-2015

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    The Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy (GPRS) articulates the Government of Grenada’s strategic vision for promoting economic growth and significantly reducing poverty in Grenada, Carriacou and Petit Martinique. The strategy is informed and guided in part by their progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

    In the document, climate resilience is named as one the four strategic orientations for achieving the nation's medium term development vision.

  • Nutrient and sediment inputs of the Beausejour river: and the impacts it may have on the adjacent coral reef system in the Moliniere Beausejour Marine Protected Area

    Type: 
    Publication
    Publication date:
    Objective:
    Approach:

    A major problem facing coral reefs in the Moliniere Beausejour Marine Protected Area (MBMPA) of Grenada is macroalgae overgrowth and their deleterious effects on corals.

    Reduced herbivory from overfishing and excess nutrients associated with pollution from land runoff have been implicated as factors causing significant increases in macroalgae cover on coral reefs.